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Top Five Antiracist Titles, including Ibram X. Kendi's 'How To Be an Antiracist' | Book Pulse

Snoop Dogg Adapts Joe Ide's IQ Series | Book Pulse

Happy Pride from Kate Milliken

Antiracist Reading & Viewing | Book Pulse

Thrillerfest 2020 Goes Virtual

Jane Smiley Leads the Way: Literary Glitter, Dec. 2020, Pt. 2 | Prepub Alert

Jeff Lindsay, Thomas Perry, & Some Stellar Newcomers: Thriller Previews, Dec. 2020, Pt. 2 | Prepub Alert

Q&A with Alice Hoffman about her upcoming novel set in the Practical Magic universe, Magic Lessons

More Antiracism Reading; Lammy Awards Honor 'Patsy' and 'Lot' | Book Pulse

PREMIUM

The Last Train to Key West

Cleeton should add to her growing fan base with this title, which is well suited for book clubs and for historical fiction fans of authors such as Renée Rosen and Susan Meissner.
PREMIUM

Thin Girls

Recommended for readers who like well-drawn, character-driven stories but can also handle detailed descriptions of eating disorder behavior. [See Prepub Alert, 12/2/19.]

28 Summers

Because Jake and Mallory meet only one weekend a year, their relationship is rendered, a perpetual holiday. Less a story about a secretive affair and more a tale of sweet nostalgia and fate, this title will be popular with a wide audience. [See Prepub Alert, 12/9/19.]
PREMIUM

One To Watch

A long and entertaining if overstuffed novel about reality TV, romance, fat-shaming, and self-esteem that will appeal to rom-com fans and likely strike a chord with plus-size readers.
PREMIUM

Closer Than She Knows

Recommended for purchase in inspirational collections.
PREMIUM

Tea by the Sea

A light read, despite the book’s serious-sounding themes.

Rift Zone

An important book to consider and savor. [See “Versifying,” LJ 1/20.]
PREMIUM

Walker Evans: Starting from Scratch

Intriguing interpretations of Evans’s photos and work process, for both specialists and general readers.

Peggy Lee: A Century of Song

Those seeking the skinny on personal information, such as Lee’s four marriages and subsequent divorces, should look elsewhere, but those wanting to geek out on the subtleties of Lee’s jazz slides, phrasing, and vocal interpretive prowess will be richly rewarded.
PREMIUM

The Seven Lives of Alejandro Jodorowsky

Fans of the creative, disturbing, psychedelic, restless, and challenging Jodorowsky will find much to appreciate here, as will anyone curious about the radical and ragged edge of 1960s theatrical and cinematic experimentation.
PREMIUM

George Harrison on George Harrison: Interviews and Encounters

Harrison’s humanity, thoughtfulness, and humor are on rich display throughout, and a portrait of his entire life emerges. A fascinating addition to the voluminous catalog of Beatle-related literature.
PREMIUM

Photo/Brut

Since photo-based work is often not emphasized in the history of art brut, this is a must-view for fans and scholars of the genre. The collection also provides a new lens with which to view the field of photography.

Music Lessons

Stimulating, thought provoking, and sometimes just provoking, Wiseman’s ruminations on all things musical (and beyond) are a trip worth taking.
PREMIUM

The Age of Undress: Art, Fashion, and the Classical Ideal in the 1790s

This title will engage readers of costume scholarship as well as historians focused on the turn of the century. There is much to learn from the well-researched text, and the book is easy to browse for its rich images that exemplify the time period.
PREMIUM

The Socrates Express: In Search of Life Lessons from Dead Philosophers

Weiner offers bubble gum philosophy that provides a quick, sweet taste and occasionally implies that the jaw exercise of chewing on philosophically challenging concepts is not rewarding. Readers seeking travelog will feel shortchanged, but those looking for lite insights will be drawn in gradually from the shallow (getting out of bed and walking) to the deep end (ageing and death).
PREMIUM

This Is What Democracy Looked Like: A Visual History of the Printed Ballot

For all American history and graphic design collections.
PREMIUM

The Meaning of Soul: Black Music and Resilience since the 1960s

A strong choice for libraries supporting African American studies or popular American music programs.

Not Go Away Is My Name

Ríos’s poems of memory and aspiration are small masterpieces of clarity and caring, “Hard at the work of being human.” A richly hopeful collection that seems especially vital now. [See “Versifying,” LJ 1/20.]

Watercolor Is for Everyone: Simple Lessons To Make Your Creative Practice a Daily Habit—3 Simple Tools, 21 Lessons, Infinite Creative Possibilities

Written in a warm and inviting tone that is both inspirational and aspirational, this is an excellent introduction for artists of all levels to the rewarding medium of watercolor.
PREMIUM

Political Suicide: The Fight for the Soul of the Democratic Party

Rall combines prose, photographs, and single-panel political cartoons in this carefully researched, fervent plea for a reorganization of the current political system.
PREMIUM

Shame Pudding: A Graphic Memoir

A sensitive coming-of-age story and tribute to how the author’s family shaped her into the artist she is, illustrated in loose pen and ink lines and distorted forms that exude Noble’s warmth for her characters.

Trots and Bonnie

An intelligent, uncompromising, and singularly candid chronicle of young womanhood.

Jack Kirby: The Epic Life of the King of Comics

Scioli details Kirby’s life with the same passion and crackling energy the King of Comics brought to his own work. An essential text for fans of the medium.
PREMIUM

Wendy, Master of Art

A savage lampooning of the art world’s self-seriousness that makes some serious points about the artistic establishment and the difficulty that accompanies dedicating oneself to creative expression.

The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Cartoonist

A hilarious, frequently cringe-inducing masterpiece from a fearless artist at the height of his powers.
PREMIUM

Ghostwriter

Pulido packs enough twists and turns to fill a door-stopping epic into 18 brilliantly concise chapters in this slim volume, which won Spain’s 2017 National Comic Book Award.
PREMIUM

Titan

Vigneault’s (The Immersion Program) decision to establish his cast and world at a slow burn over the first few chapters pays dividends in the high-stakes second half of this thoughtful and unabashedly political sf thriller.
PREMIUM

Killadelphia. Vol. 1: Sins of the Father

A strong sense of place, an offbeat take on vampire mythology, and gorgeously grim illustration combine to make this first volume in an ongoing horror series a memorable standout.
PREMIUM

Supporting Today’s Students in the Library: Strategies for Retaining and Graduating International, Transfer, First-Generation, and Re-Entry Students

All library staff should read this reminder of the ever-increasing diversity of students seeking support in libraries and consider suggested improvements to the inclusivity of systems, supports, and spaces for nontraditional students., Winnipeg
PREMIUM

Without Ever Reaching the Summit

Of interest to fans of The Snow Leopard, and those fascinated by or interested in learning more about this geographical region of Nepal.
PREMIUM

The People, No: A Brief History of Anti-Populism

A valuable history of an important political tradition, and what it means for the future.
PREMIUM

When Truth Is All You Have: Memoir of Faith, Justice, and Freedom for the Wrongly Convicted

McCloskey and Lerman’s natural storytelling style make this an enjoyable read even when addressing tough subjects. This will be essential for collections focused on social justice, the wrongly convicted, and spiritual transformation.

The Case of the Vanishing Blonde: And Other True Crime Stories

This true crime master expands the limits of the genre, digging to find answers and revealing that even the most horrific crimes are often linked to a larger story about America.
PREMIUM

14 Miles: Building the Border Wall

Written in a narrative style, this engaging book will appeal to anyone interested in learning more about who lives along the border and what a wall means to them.
PREMIUM

Is Rape a Crime? A Memoir, an Investigation, and a Manifesto

Chanel Miller’s Know My Name demonstrated that coming forward to tell one’s story is in itself a powerful form of victim advocacy; Bowdler does the same in this affecting account. [See Prepub Alert, 12/9/19.]
PREMIUM

This Is the Night Our House Will Catch Fire

There is clearly a lot to mine from Flynn’s youth, but this memoir is both disjointed and illusory, featuring imagined monologs from Flynn’s mother to engage audiences further. Best for die-hard fans of Flynn’s first memoir. [See Prepub Alert, 1/29/20.]
PREMIUM

Democracy, If We Can Keep It: The ACLU’s 100-Year Fight for Rights in America

Cose’s book is an excellent choice for anyone seeking to understand the ACLU as an organization and for those wanting to explore how the fight for civil liberties has evolved and helped to shape the society we have today
PREMIUM

The Rise of the G.I. Army, 1940–1941: The Forgotten Story of How America Forged a Powerful Army Before Pearl Harbor

A gripping study of a topic less explored, this work should appeal to readers interested in pre–World War II preparations and social and cultural aspects of U.S. Army history.
PREMIUM

Obsessed: Building a Brand People Love from Day One

At once imaginative and pragmatic, this will appeal to those who regard branding as a sometimes daunting task of creating and fostering emotional connections with customers.
PREMIUM

Six Days in August: The Story of Stockholm Syndrome

Engrossing, well researched, and tailor-made for true crime enthusiasts.

The Last Kings of Shanghai: The Rival Jewish Dynasties That Helped Create Modern China

This bold blend of personal and political history will reward enthusiastic readers for their time.
PREMIUM

Code Name Madeleine: A Sufi Spy in Nazi-Occupied Paris

A vivid and engaging biography recommended for readers of World War II history and women’s studies.

Union: The Struggle To Forge the Story of United States Nationhood

Woodard is a gifted historiographer, and this excellent work will be appreciated by anyone interested in American history and how it came to be written.
PREMIUM

The Scourge of War: The Life of William Tecumseh Sherman

Sometimes argumentative but always insightful, this study of Sherman ranks among the best renderings of the man and the conduct of the Civil War, and will help readers reconsider Sherman’s character and the discipline necessary to succeed in war.
PREMIUM

The Names of All the Flowers

An elegantly written and heartbreaking reflection on family, sibling love, and personal and racial grief. Those seeking to understand the impact of the school-to-prison link will learn much, while those who have experienced its effects will likely find plenty here that resonates.
PREMIUM

Uncrowned Queen: The Life of Margaret Beaufort, Mother of the Tudors

A highly sympathetic, spirited portrait of a major figure of the late Plantagenet and early Tudor reigns. Interested readers might also seek out Michael Jones and Malcolm Underwood’s The King’s Mother.

In the Land of Good Living: A Journey to the Heart of Florida

A humorous, heartfelt tribute to the underbelly of Florida and its people. Recommended for fans of travel literature or the unusual survival story.
PREMIUM

The Book of Rosy: A Mother’s Story of Separation at the Border

A heartfelt memoir of survival and the power of activism that is recommended for readers interested in personal narratives of migration.
PREMIUM

A-Z Common Reference Questions for Academic Librarians

An efficient and well-organized resource for UK reference desks and novice staff looking to gain confidence in that setting.
PREMIUM

The Black Cabinet: The Untold Story of African Americans and Politics During the Age of Roosevelt

A dramatic piece of nonfiction that recovers the history of a generation of leaders that helped create the environment for the civil rights battles in decades that followed Roosevelt’s death.

The Woman Who Stole Vermeer: The True Story of Rose Dugdale and the Russborough House Art Heist

A captivating book that will entertain fans across genres with its seamless blend of true crime, biography, and art history.

The Dragons, the Giant, the Women

Moore’s narrative style shines, weaving moments of lightness into a story of pain and conflict, family and war, loss and reunion. Recommended for readers of women’s stories and those interested in learning about African lived experience both on the continent and in the diaspora.

City on Fire: The Fight for Hong Kong

This fascinating read is essential for anyone interested in the current affairs of Hong Kong, specifically, and China, generally. Readers looking for a more academic take on a similar topic should consider Ngok Ma and Edmund W. Cheng’s The Umbrella Movement.
PREMIUM

The S.S. Officer’s Armchair: Uncovering the Hidden Life of a Nazi

Readers of World War II literature and the history of the Nazi regime should find this a fascinating read.
PREMIUM

The Education of John Adams

An accessible and highly recommended biography. Fans of David McCullough’s John Adams will appreciate the nuanced insights into Adams’s beliefs offered here

The Smallest Lights in the Universe

This thoughtful and affecting memoir of navigating life after loss reads like a comforting novel, inspiring others to follow their dreams and never give up on the possibilities of discovery and self-reflection. Readers seeking women’s biographies and studies in planetary science will relish this heartfelt story.
PREMIUM

Prison by Any Other Name: The Harmful Consequences of Popular Reforms

Necessary reading for any critic of mass incarceration seeking to understand the myriad policy alternatives and the path to lasting liberation.
PREMIUM

From Boots to Business: Transitioning from the Service to a Career in Business

Recommended for service veterans or those who belong to a military force and are interested in pursuing a career in business.
PREMIUM

The Cult of Smart: How Our Broken Education System Perpetuates Social Injustice

A solid addition for those dismayed by the inequities of the education system and looking to effect change.

The Growing Season: How I Saved an American Farm—And Built a New Life

Frey brings a breath of fresh air to both the personal memoir genre and the business world. Her writing is crisp and her personality winning. A must-read.

I Got a Monster: The Rise and Fall of America’s Most Corrupt Police Squad

Fans of The Wire, The Shield, and Training Day will devour, as will readers of true crime and students of urban affairs and public policy.
PREMIUM

12 Seconds of Silence: How a Team of Inventors, Tinkerers, and Spies Took Down a Nazi Superweapon

Holmes synthesizes technical reports and archival materials to produce this first book-length, accessible narrative on an essential factor of Allied victory in World War II. Readers of similar works on Navajo Code Talkers will also enjoy this story of wartime espionage.

Exercise of Power: American Failures, Successes, and a New Path Forward in the Post–Cold War World

This important work dives deep into the past three decades of American foreign policy to provide a realistic picture of how key policy decisions were crafted. Highly recommended for those wanting an examination of America’s role within the global community.
PREMIUM

Beijing: Geography, History, and Culture

This authoritative account is a valuable resource for secondary and undergraduate students, business leaders, travelers, and general readers seeking substantive, up-to-date background on this world city.
PREMIUM

Critical Insights: Conspiracies

Recommended only for large literary criticism collections.
PREMIUM

Skewed Studies: Exploring the Limits and Flaws of Health and Psychology Research

An excellent, nontechnical overview of the scientific research process for undergraduate and graduate students. While the detailed index enables use as a quick reference title, the book is most effective when read as a treatise.
PREMIUM

The Request

Bell nails the suburban niche in this absorbing work that fans of Harlan Coben will thoroughly enjoy. [See Prepub Alert, 11/25/19.]

The Cabinets of Barnaby Mayne

This glimpse into the intimate circles that will eventually spawn the great museums is highly recommended for historical fiction readers looking for a peek into a fascinating closed society. It is an equally solid choice for historical mystery readers who want to see women with intelligence and agency navigate a time and place not meant for them, but where they thrive nonetheless while solving a delightfully twisty murder. [See Prepub Alert, 11/18/19.]
PREMIUM

Clean Hands

High-tech surveillance and cloak-and-dagger activity do not offset the anticlimactic ending or the mundane plot of the Brooklyn-based private investigator and author’s third outing (after Every Man a Menace). [See Prepub Alert, 11/25.19.]
PREMIUM

Love & Other Crimes

Fans of witty characters, complicated plots, stories with somber endings, and, of course, V.I Warshawski will enjoy this book.
PREMIUM

Of Mutts and Men

Fans of this character-driven series return because of Chet’s narration and his adoration of Bernie. Despite the murders, this is a leisurely paced, feel-good book about a dog and his beloved owner, portrayed with all their flaws and insecurities. Chet’s narration adds humor to a long-running series with a strong sense of place. [See Prepub Alert, 1/7/20.]
PREMIUM

Winter Counts

Weiden’s series launch sheds much-needed light on the legal and societal barriers facing Native Americans while also delivering a suspenseful thriller that builds to a bloody climax. A worthy addition to the burgeoning canon of indigenous literature. [See Prepub Alert, 1/29/20.]
PREMIUM

The Shadows

The conclusion wraps it up too tidily, but overall, this is a successful, creepy thriller. If you like Stephen King, you’ll probably like North’s new thriller, too.
PREMIUM

Chicken: A History from Farmyard to Factory

Highly recommended for those interested in agriculture, food safety, and the humane treatment of animals.
PREMIUM

Clean: The New Science of Skin

A quick, engaging read for everyone concerned with caring for their skin, and the science behind it.
PREMIUM

The Journeys of Trees: A Story about Forests, People, and the Future

A beautiful elegy to trees and the people working to preserve them. This compelling read shows how climate change impacts the natural ranges of tree species and how scientists are creating strategies to mitigate this influence.
PREMIUM

A Dominant Character: The Radical Science and Restless Politics of J.B.S. Haldane

Social historians will appreciate the emphasis on the man and his politics, over an emphasis solely on the science, in this excellent biography.
PREMIUM

Never Conspire with a Sinful Baron

Miller (Never Kiss a Notorious Marquess) continues her “Infamous Lords” series with a charming entry featuring a surprisingly sweet hero engaging in a romantic rivalry to win a most worthy heroine.
PREMIUM

A Duke, the Lady, and a Baby

There’s enough camp in this story to house an army, but debuter Riley delivers a fine first outing in what looks to be a promising new series, welcoming a determined West Indian heroine to the Regency subgenre.
PREMIUM

Side Trip

Fans of conventional contemporary romances may be put off by the meandering and melodramatic way that the hero and heroine finally get their happily ever after. However, readers of romantic dramas à la Nicholas Sparks will likely be more tolerant of the story’s contortions.
PREMIUM

Wild Cowboy Country

Though the story features an interesting premise and a competent narrative, the central romance fails to engage readers fully.
PREMIUM

To Catch an Earl

Bateman’s second in the popular “Bow Street Bachelor” series (after This Earl of Mine) is an alluring cat-and-mouse tale between two deserving adversaries. For Regency romance fans wishing for thrills in their to-be-read list.
PREMIUM

The Seven

Despite its short length, Brock’s tale is packed with backstory and consequently lacks the popular fiction pacing many readers expect. While not entirely without intrigue, the focus is on plot, and character depth and empathy are missing. As a result, Bill is neither likable nor unlikable, he is merely a vehicle used to convey a somewhat banal tale about UFOs. Not recommended for most collections.

The Angel of the Crows

Addison (The Goblin Emperor) enthralls readers with her character-driven action, intriguing expressions of identity and sexuality, and a world set in an alternate 1880s London that captures the imagination.
PREMIUM

Corporate Gunslinger

This title is hard to categorize, but it might be of interest to readers looking for near-future corporate intrigue.
PREMIUM

Attack Surface

Thriller readers of all ages will enjoy the cool tech (sunglasses that fool facial recognition software and blurry texts that evade screen shots), Masha’s international exploits, and the impassioned arguments for privacy, transparency, and justice. [See Prepub Alert, 4/1/20]

The Vanished Queen

Campbell’s debut is filled with political intrigue, personal anguish, and family ties that bind. The prose moves smoothly through the alternating points of view of Mirantha, Anza, and Esvar, building well-rounded characters approaching the eve of revolution.
PREMIUM

Her Perfect Life

Everyone’s life has some secrets, even the life you think is perfectly charmed. YA author Taylor’s first work of adult fiction will command readers’ attention and hearts with this engrossing tale of two very different sisters.
PREMIUM

A Star Is Bored

A peek inside the wacky life of beloved Hollywood royalty, this debut novel should have wide appeal. Read-alikes include Lauren Weisberger’s The Devil Wears Prada and Joyce Carol Oates’s Blonde.

Last Tang Standing

The combination of an appealing lead, a glamorous setting, and relatable, funny portrayals of relationships and workplace politics make this debut one of the must-read escapist pleasures of the summer. Fans of Kevin Kwan’s Crazy Rich Asians and Sally Thorne’s The Hating Game will be dazzled.
PREMIUM

Ask Me Anything

Paranoia about smart appliances spying on us is a real thing, and this book feeds into that fear, albeit in a rakish, humorous way, but unfortunately, the human characters don’t quite come to life. [See Prepub Alert, 12/9/19.]
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