Graywolf

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The Renunciations: Poems

Kelly’s second effort feels scraped raw, seeking to understand humanity in primal terms in the same way as her debut, but here building to even grander emotional and linguistic crescendo.

PREMIUM

God of Nothingness: Poems

Rising from wells of loss and loneliness (“My future is the only future”), Wunderlich’s poems may seem harsh, even bitter, but their authentic, wounded humanity is no less compelling for that.

The Wild Fox of Yemen: Poems

Captivating and beautifully written, this collection will appeal to a wide variety of audiences, and those not as familiar with Yemeni history or the Arabic language will assuredly be inspired to learn more. Recommended for all collections.
PREMIUM

frank: sonnets

All in all, there’s an awareness of the poet being separated--suggesting that she’s writing the poem as a way to connect to absent loved ones--perhaps her son who lives far away from her, or her former lover, or departed family members, or even her own self. But is she? It’s hard to pin down the meaning of a Seuss poem, which adds a certain pleasing sense of mystery to the best work here.

The Twilight Zone

Fernández, 2017 winner of the prestigious Sor Juana de la Cruz Prize, delivers an emotional punch that never loses its strength, provoking responses ranging from anger to disbelief to sadness.
PREMIUM

The Discomfort of Evening

Told in Jas’s voice, this novel, this International Booker Prize winner is poetic and layered, building tension as it moves toward its devastating and catastrophic conclusion. Dutch poet Rijneveld penetrates her characters with unflinching, razor-sharp intensity as they wrestle with issues of religion, sex, and death, making for a difficult if ultimately rewarding read.
PREMIUM

That Was Now, This Is Then

In an engaging, confiding tone that embraces both wit and compassion, Seshadri enlists poetry, what he calls “spooky action at a distance,” to assure us that despite the historical moment’s forced isolation and heightened sociopolitical stress, we need not feel we’re alone.

Just Us: An American Conversation

“How does one say/ what if/ without reproach?” asks Rankine, and proceeds to show us. In the end it is “just us” wanting “justice,” which will require whiteness to be visible and interrogated. A must-read to add to the conversation on racism, antiracism, and white fragility.

The Dragons, the Giant, the Women

Moore’s narrative style shines, weaving moments of lightness into a story of pain and conflict, family and war, loss and reunion. Recommended for readers of women’s stories and those interested in learning about African lived experience both on the continent and in the diaspora.
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