Flatiron: Macmillan

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Be Water, My Friend: The Teachings of Bruce Lee

An essential book for fans of Lee and those looking for find purpose in life. Highly recommended for all readers.

Dear Child

Hausmann’s English-language debut is absorbing and sinister, with a tightening web of psychological intrigue. Tiny clues are steadily inserted into this fast-paced, shivery tale with an unforeseen denouement. Inevitably likened to Emma Donoghue’s Room, also suggest Sarah Pinborough’s Behind Her Eyes.

East: 120 Vegan and Vegetarian Recipes from Bangalore to Beijing

As in her column, Sodha presents low-effort, high-reward cooking. Home cooks, especially those looking to incorporating more vegetables into ordinary meals, will be won over by her personable advice and reassuring voice.

PREMIUM

The Glass House

Colin’s (To Capture What We Cannot Keep) lovely storytelling conveys the stark reality of women’s lives in the post-Victorian era. While vastly different in personality and temperament, Antonia and Cicely are similarly pigeonholed into roles not of their choosing, but the result of decisions made by the men in their lives. For fans of historical and women’s fiction.

Migrations

A consummate blend of issue and portrait, warning and affirmation, this heartbreaking, lushly written work is highly recommended.

PREMIUM

Real Change: Mindfulness To Heal Ourselves and the World

Fans of Salzberg’s Real Love podcast series and anyone seeking loving-kindness meditative guidance will appreciate these words on compassionate activism.
PREMIUM

Is Rape a Crime? A Memoir, an Investigation, and a Manifesto

Chanel Miller’s Know My Name demonstrated that coming forward to tell one’s story is in itself a powerful form of victim advocacy; Bowdler does the same in this affecting account. [See Prepub Alert, 12/9/19.]

Blacktop Wasteland

Bug’s got a conscience not typical of the thriller genre, but other than that, this novel recalls almost perfectly the classic heist thriller in the vein of Richard Stark’s “Parker” books. It’ll go like hot cakes.

The Paris Hours

George has captured the ethos of 1920s Paris with a feel similar to Anthony Doerr’s All the Light We Cannot See. This title is not to be missed.
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