Reese Witherspoon Picks UNTAMED; Harry Potter at Home; & J.R. Ward's THE SINNER Leads New Bestsellers | Book Pulse

Reese Witherspoon picks Untamed by Glennon Doyle as her April book club title. The Sinner by J.R. Ward leads eight new books onto the bestseller lists. J.K. Rowling launches Harry Potter at Home. The International Booker Prize shortlist is out. The Best Translated Book Awards longlist is out. Comics are suffering. Stephen King’s newest arrives earlier than previously scheduled. There are more April best book lists.

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New Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books]

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

The Sinner by J.R. Ward (Gallery Books: S. & S.) opens at No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list and No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

The Glass Hotel by Emily St. John Mandel (Knopf: Random House; LJ starred review) debuts at No.4 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 15 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Last Odyssey by James Rollins (William Morrow: Harper) holds No. 6 on both the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The City We Became by N.K. Jemisin (Orbit: Hachette; LJ starred review) takes No. 9 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Nonfiction

Lady in Waiting: My Extraordinary Life in the Shadow of the Crown by Anne Glenconner (Hachette; LJ starred review) reigns at No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 12 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Office: The Untold Story of the Greatest Sitcom of the 2000s by Andy Greene (Dutton: Penguin) starts its day at No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Upside of Being Down: How Mental Health Struggles Led to My Greatest Successes in Work and Life by Jen Gotch (Gallery: S. & S.) holds No. 11 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The System: Who Rigged It, How We Fix It by Robert B Reich (Knopf; LJ starred review) takes No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Coronavirus Reading and RA/Collection Development Resources

J.K. Rowling launches Harry Potter at Home, which allows teachers to record themselves reading the novels and includes puzzles, crafts, and more to entertain kids. Also, the first novel is on stories.audible.com for free (as are many, many more choices) and the first novels is free for all to borrow on OverDrive through April. There is more promised to come. Entertainment Weekly has a report. USA Today does as well along with the L.A. Times and People.

The Hollywood Reporter writes “For the first time in the comic book industry's more than 80-year history, there will be no new print comics debuting as of April 1.” The Conversation has a story too, “Comics vs. coronavirus: Comics industry shut down for the first time in almost a century.” As was widely reported earlier, Diamond Comics will not distribute new comics until further notice due to the pandemic. Publishers Weekly has interviews with comics retailers.

USA Today has “50 great books to entertain quarantined kids, whether they're newborns or high schoolers.”

NPR writes about teaching The Plague by Albert Camus (Vintage: Random House) and “What Literature Can Teach Us About Epidemics.”

The Guardian has a summary of some of the celebrities reading stories online during the pandemic.

Ina Garten, cookbook author and Instagram maven, is getting lots of buzz, including in The Atlantic.

The NYT has an essay about reading through difficult times.

Lena Dunham’s romance novel, Verified Strangers, is up to chapter 8.

The National Arts Centre in Canada has started #CanadaPerforms, a streaming platform to support artists. Margaret Atwood will feature today at 3 PM ET.

Writer Jack Thorne writes that he might have coronavirus.

The NYPL has a post about using photos from the library as virtual backgrounds when video conferencing.

More April Best Booklists

 

 

 

 

 

 

AV Club | Popsugar | Time | Tor.com (YA SFF) | Vogue | The Washington Post

Reviews

The Washington Post reviews Lives of Houses by Hermione Lee, Kate Kennedy (Princeton): “a lovely book to savor while you’re stuck at home.”

George Will reviews American Conservatism: Reclaiming an Intellectual Tradition edited by Andrew J. Bacevich (Library of America) for the NYT, writing it “compiles a rich menu. So rich, however, that “conservatism” comes close to being a classification that no longer classifies.” Also in the paper, Cool Town: How Athens, Georgia, Launched Alternative Music and Changed American Culture by Grace Elizabeth Hale (Univ. of North Carolina): “meticulously reported microhistory.”

NPR reviews Hurricane Season by Fernanda Melchor, translated by Sophie Hughes (New Directions: W. W. Norton): “a dark celebration of language that pushes against the rules with its collection of unreliable narrators, its shifting realities, and its endless sentences peppered with Spanish and songs. Yeah, at the end of the day, Melchor is the witch and this novel is a powerful spell.”

Book Marks picks “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

Reese Witherspoon picks Untamed by Glennon Doyle (The Dial Press: Random House) as her April book club title.

The International Booker Prize shortlist is out. Both The Guardian and The NYT have reports.

The Best Translated Book Awards issues its longlist. The Millions reports.

The May Indie Next list is published, Death in Her Hands by Ottessa Moshfegh (Penguin) is the No.1 pick. Also, The Loan Stars list is out for April.

Stephen King’s If It Bleeds (Scribner: S. & S.) is getting moved up. Bloody Disgusting reports. Edelweiss lists the pub. date as April 21, even earlier than the widely circulated April 28 date. It had been set for May 5. It is a good reminder that other books will change publication dates without as much fanfare. Changes will have impact on the monthly lists generated by various media outlest such as Entertainment Weekly and on the Indie Next list, LibraryReads, and others.

Popsugar suggests “35 Must-Read 2020 Books Written by Women.”

O: The Oprah Magazine selects “44 LGBTQ Books That Are Changing the Literary Landscape in 2020.” Popsugar chimes in with “2020 Has a Diverse Lineup of LGBTQ+ YA Books — Here Are the Best Picks.”

Shondaland has “Why 2020 Is Proving to Be A Great Year For Graphic Novels.”

USA Today writes about Joanna Gaines's new cookbook, Magnolia Table, Volume 2 : A Collection of Recipes for Gathering  (William Morrow), and the forthcoming TV show.

The NYT has a “Group Text” feature on The Boy, the Mole, the Fox and the Horse by Charlie Mackesy (HarperOne).

Entertainment Weekly previews Nick Hornby’s Just Like You (Riverhead: Penguin).

Bustle interviews Alicia Keys, More Myself: A Journey (Flatiron: Macmillan).

People features Val Kilmer, I'm Your Huckleberry: A Memoir (S. & S.). Fox News also has a report.

The NYT has a feature and interview centered upon Richard Prince: Cowboy by Robert M. Rubin, contributions by Richard Prince (Prestel: Penguin). Beverly Jenkins answers the NYT’s “By the Book” questions. The “Inside The List” feature focuses on My Dark Vanessa by Kate Elizabeth Russell (William Morrow: Harper; LJ starred review).

CrimeReads has a feature on Lee Child.

Tor.com reports on the recent Ken Liu r/Books AMA. He is the author of the recently released The Hidden Girl and Other Stories (Gallery/Saga: S. & S.) and the editor and translator of  Broken Stars: Contemporary Chinese Science Fiction in Translation (Tor Books: Macmillan).

The L.A. Times has its second installment of United We Read.

Electric Lit posts "The Appropriate Weight" by Corinne Manning, as recommended by Arsenal Pulp Press.

The Atlantic re-publishes Sylvia Plath’s poem “Circus in Three Rings.”

Author Mark Lawrence, The Girl and the Stars, (Ace: Penguin) writes about not being able to see images in his head.

 The New Republic investigates “the most toxic book of a toxic season,” Woody Allen’s memoir.

The NYT has a 36 Hours column crowd-sourced with suggestions of what to do when you cannot travel, including a few book suggestions.

Authors on Air

NPR’s Morning Edition interviews Huda Fahmy, That Can Be Arranged: A Muslim Love Story (Andrews McMeel Publishing).

Quentin Tarantino might write a novelization of Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. Entertainment Weekly has details.

Alicia Keys, More Myself: A Journey (Flatiron: Macmillan), will be on Stephen Colbert tonight.

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Author Image
Neal Wyatt

nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

Neal Wyatt is LJ’s readers’ advisory columnist, contributing The Reader’s Shelf, Book Pulse, and Wyatt’s World columns. She is the coauthor of The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction, 3d ed. (ALA Editions, 2019). Contact her at nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

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