Super Tuesday for Books, Sept. 10, 2019 | Book Pulse

The NYT declares today Super Tuesday for books. Europa Editions tweets the opening paragraph of the next Elena Ferrante novel. Barbara Hoffert’s Prepub Alert hits March 2020. Changes to BookExpo are announced.

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Super Tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

 

The NYT declares it “Super Tuesday” for books, with five of the fall’s biggest out today.

Reviews

It also must be a super day for reviews at the NYT, as the paper prints more than 20 in 24 hours. Some highlights include Guest House for Young Widows: Among the Women of ISIS by Azadeh Moaveni (Random House): “a powerful, indispensable book on a challenging subject.” Also, The Education of an Idealist: A Memoir by Samantha Power, (Dey Street Books: Harper): “This is a wonderful book.” Out of Darkness, Shining Light by Petina Gappah (Scribner: S. & S.; LJ starred review): "the real heroes of this carefully crafted novel are Halima and Wainwright and the other Africans history has hitherto condemned to suffer in silence. It is to the novel’s credit that after 150 years we can now hear their voices.” The Meritocracy Trap: How America's Foundational Myth Feeds Inequality, Dismantles the Middle Class, and Devours the Elite by Daniel Markovits (Penguin): “ambitious and disturbing.” Gun Island by Amitav Ghosh (FSG: Macmillan): “Climate change might be our successor to the Black Death: We may have to use all our inventive ability, rational and magical, to think our way out of it.” Ducks, Newburyport by Lucy Ellmann (Biblioasis): “brilliantly ambitious.” The Institute by Stephen King (Scribner: S. & S.): “as consummately honed and enthralling as the very best of his work.” Akin by Emma Donoghue Little, Brown: Hachette): “Parenting, Donoghue reminds us, is a common experience of uncommon intensity.” How The Other Half Learns: Equality, Excellence, and the Battle Over School Choice by Robert Pondiscio (Avery: Penguin): “With this morally disturbing conclusion to his unsparingly honest book, Pondiscio implicates all of us in the unforgivable neglect of children and education in our poorest communities." More can be found here.

NPR reviews The Testaments: The Sequel to The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (Nan A. Talese: Random House; LJ starred review): “Atwood here foresees the possibility of hope: hope that the forces of resistance and sisterhood will eventually triumph over misogyny, power-mongering and the despoiling of the planet.” Also, Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir (Tor.com: Macmillan): “a freaky science-fantasy-horror-romance mash-up that owes its innards to M.A.S.H. and Harry Potter in equal measure; to a thousand Agatha Christie locked-house mysteries and Sweet Valley High. The set-up is genius.” Tinfoil Butterfly by Rachel Eve Moulton (MCD x FSG Originals: Macmillan): “do yourself a favor and let Moulton's darkness invade your blood.”

The Washington Post reviews The Institute by Stephen King (Scribner: S. & S.): “it is classic King, with an extra measure of urgency and anger.” Also, The World Doesn't Require You: Stories by Rion Amilcar Scott (Liveright: W. W. Norton): “all of the shorter pieces contribute to and gain full velocity in that novella. Is this a collection, or a different way of dividing a novel? Does it matter? Not really, except that not finishing would be a shame.”

USA Today reviews The Institute by Stephen King (Scribner: S. & S.), giving it three stars and writing it is “missing the appealing vim and vigor displayed in the author’s recent foray into detective work … you don’t have to be a psychic to figure out there’s a lot of “been there, read that” with The Institute.”

Briefly Noted

Europa Editions tweets the opening paragraph of the next Elena Ferrante novel. A title and pub. date are not yet available.

The Bustle September Book Club title is The Truth Is by NoNieqa Ramos (Carolrhoda Lab: Lerner).

The One Book, One Chicago title is The Sixth Extinction by Elizabeth Kolbert.

Barbara Hoffert’s Prepub Alert hits March 2020. Also, her starred review of The Testaments: The Sequel to The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (Nan A. Talese: Random House; LJ starred review) is out.

LitHub suggests 5 Books You May Have Missed This August.”

The Atlantic digs into She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement by Jodi Kantor, Megan Twohey (Penguin).

NPR interviews Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement (Penguin).

O: The Oprah Magazine interviews Margaret Atwood.

Electric Lit interviews Tash Aw, We, the Survivors (FSG: Macmillan).

Entertainment Weekly interviews Malcolm Gladwell, Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know about the People We Don't Know (Little, Brown: Hachette).

LitHub has five authors answer its questionnaire: Brian Allen Carr, Jennifer Croft, Jennine Capó Crucet, Angie Cruz, and Alan Lightman.

USA Today features Audience of One: Donald Trump, Television, and the Fracturing of America by James Poniewozik (Liveright: W.W. Norton).

Paste showcases Super Pumped: The Battle for Uber by Mike Isaac (W.W. Norton).

The Atlantic considers Sontag: Her Life and Work by Benjamin Moser (Ecco: Harper).

USA Today spotlights Antoni in the Kitchen by Antoni Porowski, Mindy Fox (Rux Martin/HMH).

Bustle’s “I’m So Jealous” series considers The Dark Half by Stephen King (Signet: Penguin).

Author Jesse Ball highlights “Five Texts That Changed My Students Forever” for LitHub.

Marvel announces that World Fantasy Award-Winning Author Fonda Lee will join the team writing the Sword Master comics.

Entertainment Weekly has an audio excerpt of The Institute by Stephen King, read by Santino Fontana (S. & S. Audio).

Time excerpts Eyes to the Wind: A Memoir of Love and Death, Hope and Resistance by Ady Barkan (Atria: S. & S.), also, The Most Spectacular Restaurant in the World: The Twin Towers, Windows on the World, and the Rebirth of New York by Tom Roston (Abrams).

Entertainment Weekly excerpts the Sabrina the Teenage Witch comic.

Bustle excerpts In Five Years by Rebecca Serle (Atria: S. & S.).

The Verge writes “Carnival Row is the latest H.P. Lovecraft descendant to directly subvert his racism.”

Electric Lit has “10 Books About Trying to Survive Under Late Capitalism.”

Tor.com offers “The Rise of Geoscience Fiction: Seven Books About Remaking the World.”

The Guardian reports the mayor of the Rio de Janiero attempted “to seize copies of Avengers: The Children’s Crusade” and other LGBTQ content.

Shelf Awareness reports changes to BookExpo. It will “return to a two-day trade show format--on Thursday and Friday, with educational programming Wednesday-Friday--followed on the weekend by BookCon.”

Real Simple writes “People Who Read Before Bed Not Only Sleep Better, But Eat More Healthily and Make More Money.”

Jonathan Franzen makes up a climate change model, and social media erupts. The Guardian has details.

Authors on Air

PBS NewsHour interviews Margaret Atwood. More here on some the books that influenced the story.

NPR interviews Stephne Kinzer, Poisoner in Chief: Sidney Gottlieb and the CIA Search for Mind Control (Henry Holt: Macmillan; LJ starred review).

Entertainment Weekly has an interview with some of the cast of The Goldfinch.

The NYT interviews the director of It, Andy Muschietti.

Town & County focuses on Outlander, here too and here.

Essence has a list of Fall movies, several are based on books.

Deadline reports that the forthcoming novel from Carrie Arcos, Skywatchers, has been optioned.

Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement (Penguin), will be on with Stephen Colbert tonight.

Malcolm Gladwell, Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know about the People We Don't Know (Little, Brown: Hachette), will be on The View.

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