Simon & Schuster For Sale, Reading Lists for the Pandemic, & New Best Sellers | Book Pulse

Simon & Schuster is for sale. On Friday, Oprah Winfrey will host a two-parter of her book club show featuring American Dirt. Sandman is getting adapted into a multi-part Audible drama. Neil Gaiman will narrate. Blindside by James Patterson, James O. Born and The Splendid and the Vile: A Saga of Churchill, Family, and Defiance During the Blitz by Erik Larson top the bestseller lists. Pennie Clark Ianniciello picks Lost Boy Found by Kirsten Alexander. Plague reading.

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New Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books]

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

Blindside by James Patterson, James O. Born (Little, Brown: Hachette) debuts at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Warsaw Protocol by Steve Berry (Minotaur: Macmillan) holds No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 7 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Coconut Layer Cake Murder by Joanne Fluke (Kensington: Random House) takes the cake at No. 6 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Apeirogon by Colum McCann (Random House; LJ starred review) tells its tales at No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Nonfiction

The Splendid and the Vile: A Saga of Churchill, Family, and Defiance During the Blitz by Erik Larson (Crown: Random House) debuts at No. 1 on both the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Unknown Valor: A Story of Family, Courage, and Sacrifice from Pearl Harbor to Iwo Jima by Martha MacCallum (Harper) holds No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 15 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Hope of Glory: Reflections on the Last Words of Jesus from the Cross by Jon Meacham (Convergent Books: Random House) claims No. 4 the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Ultimate Retirement Guide for 50+: Winning Strategies to Make Your Money Last a Lifetime by Suze Orman (Hay House: Penguin) wraps up the USA Today Best-Selling Books list at No 12.

Review

The NYT reviews These Ghosts Are Family by Maisy Card (S. & S.): “rich, ambitious.” Also, Rebel Cinderella: Rose Pastor Stokes: Sweatshop Immigrant, Aristocrat’s Wife, Socialist Crusader by Adam Hochschild (HMH; LJ starred review): “Hochschild is a superb writer who makes light work of heavy subjects.” The Exhibition of Persephone Q by Jessi Jezewska Stevens (FSG: Macmillan): “The novel has a romantic slowness, unfurling gracefully, little by little, to show how quickly the present gives way to the future, or concedes to the past” (there is an excerpt).

The L.A. Time reviews Legendary Children: The First Decade of RuPaul's Drag Race and the Last Century of Queer Life by Tom Fitzgerald, Lorenzo Marquez (Penguin): “aims to broaden our understanding of the rich drag culture driving every scene of Drag Race … into a deceptively simple framing device for a nuanced exploration of the gender-bending figures, insider lingo and significant milestones in queer history to which the show owes its existence.” Also, The Body Double by Emily Beyda (Doubleday: Random House): “unsettling.”

The Washington Post reviews Writers & Lovers by Lily King (Grove Press; LJ starred review): “wonderful, witty, heartfelt.” Also, Legendary Children: The First Decade of RuPaul's Drag Race and the Last Century of Queer Life by Tom Fitzgerald, Lorenzo Marquez (Penguin), calling it "a love letter to queer identity."

NPR reviews Writers & Lovers by Lily King (Grove Press; LJ starred review): “a book about passion, desire, grief, determination, and finding one's way. It's also about craving love, family, and success.”

LitHub has “Five Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

Simon & Schuster is for sale. ViacomCBS puts it up for auction. The NYT has details and writes about the consolidation in publishing, the status of S&S, and the future plans of ViacomCBS.

The Millions runs their March preview.

Town & Country picks the best books of 2020 (so far).

Shondaland selects five books to read this month.

Barbara Hoffert issues Prepub Alert through September 2020.

LitHub picks “5 Sci-Fi and Fantasy Books to Watch For in March.”

Popsugar suggests “8 Must-Read Books by Latinx Authors.”

Electric Lit offers “5 New Books for Your Winter Mood.”

Autostraddle gathers “Lesbian Romance Novels to Read When You’re Perpetually Single.” Also, a piece on Everything Is Beautiful, and I'm Not Afraid : A Baopu Collection by Yao Xiao (Andrews McMeel Publishing).

In Costco Connection, Pennie Clark Ianniciello picks Lost Boy Found by Kirsten Alexander (Grand Central: Hachette) as her book of the month.

In Five Years by Rebecca Serle (Atria : S. & S.) is the March bookclub pick for Good Morning America.

The Ezra Jack Keats Award winners are announced.

Belletrist announces its next #WhyNotYA conversation, centered on “topics like rewriting history and intersectional feminism” and launching off from Dread Nation by Justina Ireland (Balzer + Bray: Harper; SLJ starred review).

The NYT features Glennon Doyle, Untamed (The Dial Press: Random House).

Paste excerpts the forthcoming The Cousins by Karen M. McManus (Delacorte Press, Dec. 2020).

Vulture excerpts Legendary Children: The First Decade of RuPaul's Drag Race and the Last Century of Queer Life by Tom Fitzgerald, Lorenzo Marquez (Penguin).

Tor.com excerpts Bystander 27 by Rik Hoskin (Angry Robot: Penguin).

Entertainment Weekly excerpts A Star Is Bored by Byron Lane (Henry Holt: Macmillan). Lane is the former personal assistant to Carrie Fisher.

In more forthcoming book news, Tor.com reports that an illustrated edition of Unfinished Tales by J. R. R. Tolkien is on its way from Harper this October.

The NYT asks Anne Enright, Actress (W.W. Norton), its “By the Book” questions. Erik Larson, The Splendid and the Vile: A Saga of Churchill, Family, and Defiance During the Blitz (Crown: Random House), is the focus of the “Inside the List” feature

Town & Country interviews Myka Meier, Modern Etiquette Made Easy: A Five-Step Method to Mastering Etiquette (Skyhorse).

People features Katherine Schwarzenegger, The Gift of Forgiveness: Inspiring Stories from Those Who Have Overcome the Unforgivable (Pamela Dorman Books: Penguin). Here too.

Bitch Media headlines “Escapist Young Adult Novels Offer a Breath of Fresh Air in the Current Political Climate.”

Tor.com has a “Walk Through the History of Black Science Fiction” written by Nisi Shawl. Also, the site prints the short story “The City Born Great” by N.K. Jemisin which serves as the basis for her forthcoming The City We Became (Orbit: Hachette).

The Washington Post appreciates books on the history of science fiction and horror. Also, a consideration of the “dubious books” about coronavirus.

There are other books about viruses, and getting a hot hand right now is Dean Koontz’s The Eyes of Darkness, which is included in The Guardian’s exploration of pandemic fiction. LitHub has a bit on plague reading too.

Tor.com has Jo Walton’s Reading List for February.

The Guardian writes about Willem Anker, a new International Booker prize nominee, his use of Cormac McCarthy’s fiction, and questions of appropriation and plagiarism.

Children’s author Ann Grifalconi has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Authors on Air

Oprah Winfrey will host a two-parter of her book club show featuring American Dirt. It will include an interview with Jeanine Cummins. Authors Reyna Grande, Esther Cepeda, and Julissa Arce will also be part of the conversation. It airs on Friday, March 6 on Apple TV+. USA Today has details, O: The Oprah Magazine has a clip, and Entertainment Weekly has a trailer.

NPR interviews Laura Zigman, Separation Anxiety (Ecco: Harper).

Sandman is getting adapted into a multi-part Audible drama. Neil Gaiman will executive produce and narrate. The Hollywood Reporter has details and a trailer.

The newest Bond film, No Time To Die, will be moved to late November, due to the coronavirus. James B. Stewart’s Den of Thieves is optioned for TV. The Batmobile gets a reveal. Release dates are out for Stargirl (May 12) and The 100 (May 20), both on The CW. Deadline has details.

The NYT has a piece about the new The Booksellers documentary.

The Today show features Midwest Made: Big, Bold Baking from the Heartland by Shauna Sever (Running Press: Hachette).

A trailer is out for The Library That Dolly Built. It comes out on April 2. Read more about the film here.

James Taylor, musician and author of the Audible only Break Shot: My First 21 Years: An Audio Memoir, will be on with Seth Meyers tonight.

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Neal Wyatt

nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

Neal Wyatt is LJ’s readers’ advisory columnist, contributing The Reader’s Shelf, Book Pulse, and Wyatt’s World columns. She is the coauthor of The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction, 3d ed. (ALA Editions, 2019). Contact her at nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

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