New Jack Reacher and Wimpy Kid Are Bestsellers | Book Pulse

The Sentinel: A Jack Reacher Novel by Lee Child and Andrew Child and Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Deep End by Jeff Kinney top the fiction bestsellers lists this week. The best-selling audiobooks of the month are A Time for Mercy by John Grisham, read by Michael Beck, and Greenlights, written and read by Matthew McConaughey. R.B. Lemberg, The Four Profound Weaves: A Birdverse Book, is the 2020 Le Guin Feminist Science Fiction Fellow. The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman wins the 2020 WHSmith Book of the Year. The estate of Truman Capote has filed a lawsuit over rights to develop prequels, sequels, or series related to Breakfast at Tiffany's.

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New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

Fiction

The Sentinel: A Jack Reacher Novel by Lee Child and Andrew Child (Delacorte Press: Random House) debuts at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Deep End by Jeff Kinney (Amulet Books: Abrams) claims the No. 1 spot on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Three Women Disappear by James Patterson and Shan Serafin (Little, Brown: Hachette) appears at No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 14 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Wonder Boy of Whistle Stop by Fannie Flagg (Random House) starts at No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 13 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Noel Letters by Richard Paul Evans (Gallery: S. & S.) takes No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Truly, Madly, Deeply by Karen Kingsbury (Atria: S. & S.) holds No. 8 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Shakeup by Stuart Woods (G.P. Putnam's Sons: Penguin) comes in at No. 10 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

5 More Sleeps ‘til Christmas by Jimmy Fallon and Rich Deas (Feiwel & Friends: Macmillan) closes the USA Today Best-Selling Books list at No. 11.

Nonfiction

Group: How One Therapist and a Circle of Strangers Saved My Life by Christie Tate (Avid Reader Press: S. & S) sits at No. 6 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Audiobooks

A Time for Mercy by John Grisham, read by Michael Beck (Random House Audio) tops the November NYT Audio Fiction Best Sellers list, while Greenlights, written and read by Matthew McConaughey (Random House Audio), tops the November NYT Audio Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Antiracist Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list  

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon): No. 2 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House; LJ starred review): No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): No. 5 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 6 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House): No. 8 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo (Seal: Hachette; LJ starred review): No. 10 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (New Press): No. 11 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

How To Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (One World: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list. 

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah (One World: Random House): No. 12 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The L.A. Times reviews Collected Stories by Shirley Hazzard (FSG: Macmillan): "No one would argue that her short stories are Hazzard’s best work, nor recommend reading all 28 straight through."

The Washington Post reviews Right Place, Right Time: The Life of a Rock & Roll Photographer by Bob Gruen (Abrams): "The writing is tepid, the pictures priceless."

NPR reviews The Harpy, Megan Hunter (Grove Press): "It is introspective and the prose is quietly beautiful. It shows that a tired and tried subject, such as adultery, still has some juice one can squeeze out."

Time reviews Metropolis: A History of the City, Humankind's Greatest Invention by Ben Wilson (Doubleday: Random House): "At this current scary moment, when crowded cities can seem dangerous, even life-threatening, looking at history to see what emerges from the other side is instructive in imagining what can come next."

The NYT reviews How To Make a Slave and Other Essays by Jerald Walker (Mad Creek: Ohio State Univ.): "The essays in this collection are restless, brilliant and short … Keeping things quick gives him the freedom to move; he can alight on a truth without pinning it into place." Also, a look at three historical novels: The Eyes of the Queen by Oliver Clements (Atria/One Signal: S. & S.), Pont Neuf by Max Byrd (Permuted: S. & S.), and The Glass House by Beatrice Colin (Flatiron: Macmillan).

Book Marks picks "5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week."

Briefly Noted

R.B. Lemberg, The Four Profound Weaves: A Birdverse Book (Tachyon; LJ starred review), is the 2020 Le Guin Feminist Science Fiction Fellow. Locus reports.

The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman (Pamela Dorman Books: Penguin; LJ starred review) is the 2020 WHSmith Book of the Year.

The Millions picks the best new poetry of the month.

BookPage suggests new releases that "help foster a stronger relationship with the living world around us."

The AV Club picks "5 books to read in November."

CrimeReads offers "10 Novels You Should Read This November."

Shelf Awareness lists the best books out next week.

NYPL suggests "New Cozy Mysteries to Curl Up With This Fall."

Barbara Hoffert has new Prepub Alert columns in LJ.

People profiles Michael J. Fox, No Time Like the Future: An Optimist Considers Mortality (Flatiron: Macmillan).

The NYT talks to Robin Wall Kimmerer about how Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants (Milkweed) is now on its Best Sellers list, seven years after the book's publication. 

Entertainment Weekly's "What's in a Page" column features Marissa Meyer, Instant Karma (Feiwel & Friends: Macmillan).

CrimeReads has a Q&A with Tana French, The Searcher (Viking: Penguin; LJ starred review).

The New Yorker features How God Becomes Real: Kindling the Presence of Invisible Others by T.M. Luhrmann (Princeton).

Book Riot examines "The History of Dust Jackets."

Authors on Air

David Sedaris, The Best of Me (Little, Brown: Hachette), will appear on Late Night with Seth Meyers tonight. He's also a guest on The Maris Review podcast.

Claudia Rankine speaks with Just the Right Book with Roxanne Coady about Just Us: An American Conversation (Graywolf Press: Macmillan; LJ starred review).

A UK National Theatre production of Shakespeare's Romeo & Juliet is in the works for PBS. Town & Country reports.

Deadline reports the estate of Truman Capote has filed a lawsuit over rights to develop prequels, sequels, or series related to Breakfast at Tiffany's.

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