Martha Wells, N.K. Jemisin, Silvia Moreno-Garcia, and More Win Locus Awards | Book Pulse

The 2021 Locus Awards are announced: Network Effect: A Murderbot Novel by Martha Wells wins best Science Fiction novel; The City We Became by N.K. Jemisin wins best Fantasy novel; Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia wins best Horror novel; and Elatsoe by Darcie Little Badger wins best First novel. The 2021 Orwell Prize winners are also announced including Between Two Fires: Truth, Ambition, and Compromise in Putin’s Russia by Joshua Yaffa and Summer by Ali Smith. Survive the Night by Riley Sager leads holds this week. Five LibraryReads and two Indie Next picks publish this week. People's book of the week is Songs in Ursa Major by Emma Brodie. Plus, Lady Boss: The Jackie Collins Story on CNN gets buzz. Entertainment Weekly shares the best books of 2021 (so far).

 

 

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Awards

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 2021 Locus Awards are announced. Network Effect: A Murderbot Novel by Martha Wells (Tor.com: Macmillan) wins best Science Fiction novel; The City We Became by N.K. Jemisin (Orbit: Hachette; LJ starred review) wins best Fantasy novel; Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia (Del Rey: Random House) wins best Horror novel; and Elatsoe by Darcie Little Badger, illustrated by Rovina Cai (Levine Querido: Chronicle) wins best First novel. Here is the full list of winners. 

The Orwell Foundation announced the 2021 Orwell Prize Winners including Between Two Fires: Truth, Ambition, and Compromise in Putin’s Russia by Joshua Yaffa (Tim Duggan: Crown) for Political Writing and Summer by Ali Smith (Pantheon) for Political Fiction. 

Big Books of the Week

Survive the Night by Riley Sager (Dutton) leads holds this week.

Other titles in demand include:

When Stars Collide : A Chicago Stars Novel by Susan Elizabeth Phillips (William Morrow)

The Personal Librarian by Marie Benedict & Victoria Christopher Murray (Berkley; LJ starred review)

The Night Hawks by Elly Griffiths (Houghton Harcourt)

Someone To Cherish by Mary Balogh (Berkley; LJ starred review)

These books and others publishing the week of June 28th, 2021 are listed in a downloadable spreadsheet.

Librarians and Booksellers Suggest

There are five LibraryReads selections two Indie Next picks publishing this week:

When Stars Collide: A Chicago Stars Novel by Susan Elizabeth Phillips (William Morrow)

“Quarterback Thad and opera star Olivia embark on a weeks-long PR campaign for an upscale watch company. Both successful in their careers, they each have a strong sense of themselves, which makes for a refreshingly toned down take on the hero-to-the- rescue trope in this unputdownable read.”—Janet Schneider, Peninsula Public Library, Lawrence, NY

Survive the Night by Riley Sager (Dutton)

“In the 1990s, Charlie, a traumatized woman who sees life like a movie, heads home from college. After agreeing to share a ride with a stranger, she begins to fear that she’s in danger. With heart- pounding suspense, nostalgic film references, and a locked room setting, this is a fun throwback thriller.”—Vanessa Phillips, Pelion Branch Library, Pelion, SC

The Night Hawks by Elly Griffiths (Houghton Harcourt)

“In the thirteenth Ruth Galloway mystery, the forensic archeologist returns to familiar ground in Norfolk, where she’s accepted a post at a local university. A dead body is found nearby and soon Dr. Galloway is back on the case in a satisfying story full of surprise twists and familiar faces.”—Meredith Snepp, Topeka and Shawnee County Public Library, Topeka, KS

To Sir, with Love by Lauren Layne (Gallery; LJ starred review)

"A modern take on You've Got Mail set in New York City. Gracie is running her family's champagne boutique while Sebastian and his family are trying to buy out the building. The results are a meet-cute times two that would certainly make Nora Ephron proud. For fans of Jennifer Cruisie and Talia Hibbert."—Amy Mehrle, Gwinnett County Public Library, Dacula, GA

The Personal Librarian by Marie Benedict & Victoria Christopher Murray (Berkley; LJ starred review)

"Both history and homage to The Morgan Library, one of the world’s greatest private libraries. It is also the story of a young African-American woman named Belle posing as a white woman of Portuguese descent. For fans of Fiona Davis’ historical novels."—Jennifer Winberry, Hunterdon County Library, Flemington, NJ

It is also an IndieNext pick:

“I dearly loved this historical fiction based on the life of J.P. Morgan's personal librarian. My favorite combination of entertaining and educational!”—Elizabeth Barnhill, Fabled Bookshop & Café, Waco, TX

One additional IndieNext pick arrives this week:

The Way She Feels by Courtney Cook (Tin House Books)

“This memoir is vital in that it humanizes one of the most commonly misunderstood and highly stigmatized mental illnesses — borderline personality disorder. The Way She Feels beautifully illustrates the incredible strength and perseverance it can take to cope with mental illness.”—Mary Wahlmeier, Raven Book Store, Lawrence, KS

In the Media

The People "Picks" book of the week is Songs in Ursa Major by Emma Brodie (Knopf; LJ starred review). Also getting attention are Rock the Boat by Beck Dorey-Stein (Dial), and What Happened to Paula: On the Death of an American Girl by Katherine Dykstra (Norton). A “New in Thrillers" section highlights The Maidens by Alex Michaelides (Celadon), The Damage by Caitlin Wahrer (Pamela Dorman) and Suburban Dicks by Fabian Nicieza (G.P. Putnam’s Sons).

The “Picks” section features False Positive on Hulu, based on an original story by John Lee, Ilana Glazer and Alissa Nutting. Also The Mysterious Benedict Society, based on the book by Trenton Lee Stewart, on Disney+. Plus Lady Boss: The Jackie Collins Story on CNN.

There is a profile of Richard Marx, whose Stories To Tell: A Memoir (S. & S) publishes July 6th. There is also a feature story on the royal rift between William and Harry which highlights Battle of Brothers: William and Harry – the Inside Story of a Family in Tumult by Robert Lacey (Harper Paperbacks).

Reviews

NPR reviews Blackout by Dhonielle Clayton, Tiffany D. Jackson, Nic Stone, Angie Thomas, Ashley Woodfolk, and Nicola Yoon (Quill Tree Books): “young Black love with all its insecurities, mistakes, emotion, honesty, and humanity makes for a lush read….And though it was written for young adults, Blackout is a must-read for all generations.” And, Antiman: A Hybrid Memoir by Rajiv Mohabir (Restless Books): “he recounts growing up feeling like an outsider due to the strict command his community held on his understanding of race and sexuality, and how leaning into the language of his ancestors helped him begin a journey of discovery and assurance, eventually finding his way back to himself.”

LA Times reviews The Great Mistake by Jonathan Lee (Knopf): “Lee has given his subject a prose memorial with a beating heart and superb mind, something worthy at last of a complicated man whose vision far exceeded his fame.”

The Washington Post reviews American Republics: A Continental History of the United States, 1783–1850 by Alan Taylor (Norton): “Diligently researched, engagingly written and refreshingly framed, “American Republics” is an unflinching historical work that shows how far we’ve come toward achieving the ideals in the Declaration — and the deep roots of the opposition to those ideals.” And, Nightmare Scenario: Inside the Trump Administration's Response to the Pandemic That Changed History by Yasmeen Abutaleb, Damian Paletta (Harper): “This is not a place to come if you want to understand the nitty-gritty of why the CDC’s test development went so very awry. But Abutaleb and Paletta are on the money when it comes to the challenges in formulating policy advice on the basis of science that was not fully settled.” NYT also reviews: “There are scoops in this book, but for the most part they’re more like teaspoons of weak tea than substantive revelations.” Also, Palace of the Drowned by Christine Mangan (Flatiron): “This is one damp creeper that will give readers renewed appreciation for the stability of dry land.”

Briefly Noted

NPR interviews Graham Norton about Home Stretch (HarperVia) and how forgiveness is a super power.

NYT talks with Gabriel Krauze about the relentless bleakness of his book Who They Was (Bloomsbury). Also, an interview with Francine Prose, The Vixen (Harper) and the confession that she's "easily bored with books." Plus, the critic's pick is Lady Boss: The Jackie Collins Story.

Time considers Build Your House Around My Body by Violet Kupersmith (Random House), calling it a “satisfying story of possession and revenge.”

Entertainment Weekly shares the best books of 2021(so far).

USA Today picks five books for the week.

CrimeReads suggests 10 books out this week and “cozy mysteries for gardeners.” Plus, a piece on “Immortalizing Jack Reacher” and how authors choose to age their characters.

ElectricLit shares "9 books about being unemployed or underemployed." 

Authors on Air

USA Today spotlights new documentary Lady Boss: The Jackie Collins Story on CNN.

THR reports that Legendary Entertainment has found a director for Devolution, adapted from Devolution: A Firsthand ­Account of the Rainier Sasquatch Massacre by Max Brooks (Del Rey: Ballantine; LJ starred review).

George R.R. Martin discusses how the television adaptation of GOT diverged from the source material. Deadline has more.

Patty Jenkins’s Star Wars: Rogue Squadron, with associated titles, gets a writer. Details at The Hollywood Reporter.

Sam Neill, Christoph Waltz and Patrick Gibson to headline the fantasy adventure film The Portable Door, based on the series by Tom Holt. Variety reports.

LitHub reports that "Richard Wright’s lost novel has just been optioned for seven figures."

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.
Comment Policy:
  • Be respectful, and do not attack the author, people mentioned in the article, or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  • Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  • Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.
  • Comments may be republished in print, online, or other forms of media.
  • If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.


RELATED 

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?

We are currently offering this content for free. Sign up now to activate your personal profile, where you can save articles for future viewing

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?