2021 Republic of Consciousness Prize Shortlist Announced | Book Pulse

The 2021 Republic of Consciousness Prize for Small Presses shortlist and the 2020 Believer Book Award winners and finalists are announced. The Yale Review will have a new website, TYR, for literary content accessible to the public. While Justice Sleeps by Stacey Abrams, That Summer by Jennifer Weiner, Yearbook by Seth Rogen, and Billie Eilish by Billie Eilish top the best seller lists. Interviews with Brandon Taylor of Filthy Animals, Maggie O’Farrell of Hamnet, and Charles Yu of Interior Chinatown. There will be an Oct 12 release date for Bourdain: The Definitive Oral Biography by Laurie Woolever. T Kira Madden, author of Long Live the Tribe of Motherless Girls, discusses centering Pacific Island voices.

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Awards & News

 2021 Republic of Consciousness Prize for Small Presses announced its shortlist.

The 2020 Believer Book Award winners and finalists are announced.

The Yale Review announced a new website, TYR, for literary content to be accessible to the public. Lit Hub has the story.

New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

Fiction

While Justice Sleeps by Stacey Abrams (Doubleday) rises to No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

That Summer by Jennifer Weiner (Atria: S. & S.) swims to No. 5 on both the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list andthe USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

People We Meet on Vacation by Emily Henry (Berkley; LJ starred review) greets No. 8 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Devil May Dance by Jake Tapper (Little, Brown and Company) waltzes to No. 11 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

The Summer of Lost and Found by Mary Alice Monroe (Gallery) discovers No. 14 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Nonfiction

Yearbook by Seth Rogen (Crown) debuts at No. 2 on both the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Billie Eilish by Billie Eilish (Grand Central) sings at No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 13 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Brat: An ’80s Story by Andrew McCarthy (Grand Central) shines at No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 15 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Happiest Man on Earth: The Beautiful Life of an Auschwitz Survivor by Eddie Jaku (Harper: HarperCollins; LJ starred review) lives at No. 13 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The Washington Post reviews Heart of Fire: An Immigrant Daughter’s Story by Mazie Hirono (Viking: Penguin): “In many ways “Heart of Fire” is two books: Hirono’s courageous and vivid depiction of growing up in Hawaii as a poor immigrant, and her account of a political life, laden with details but lacking the same vibrancy and candor.” Also, The Double Life of Bob Dylan (Little, Brown): "If anyone is entitled to write this exhaustive biography, it’s the man who was described by Rolling Stone in 2016 as “perhaps the world’s authority on all things Dylan.” And if he is as jaw-droppingly good at his job as his subject is at music, Heylin can also be just as prickly."

The Los Angeles Times reviews Unsettled Ground by Claire Fuller (Tin House; LJ starred review): ““Unsettled Ground” is a brilliant and sly study of family in a rural English cottage, the kind of fairy-tale landscape people dream about (cottagecore!). Also, Secrets of Happiness by Joan Silber (Counterpoint): “Silber’s effortless dissemination of facts in narrative is always impressive because her characters are so engaging and believable.”

NYT reviews King Richard: Nixon and Watergate: An American Tragedy by Michael Dobbs (Knopf: Random House): “He has taken the vast literature about his subject, along with the 3,700 hours of Nixon’s tape recordings that were released to the public in 2013, to recreate the daily dramas of an increasingly paranoid Nixon and his increasingly paranoid co-conspirators. Out of this raw material, Dobbs has carved out something intimate and extraordinary, skillfully chiseling out the details to bring the story to lurid life.”

NPR reviews Freedom by Sebastian Junger (S. & S.): “It's an odd, rambling book that doesn't really arrive at a conclusion, and at times seems unsure what questions it's asking in the first place.” Fresh Air reviews Second Place by Rachel Cusk (Farrar; LJ starred review): “"Second Place" is filled with sharp perceptions about love, child-rearing and creativity that are, alas, too long to quote.”

Locus Magazine reviews The Alien Stars and Other Novellas by Tim Pratt (Watkins: Penguin): “Introspective about the power of truth and story, about personal ethics and interpersonal relationships and how hard it is when people who were kind to you turn out to be monsters, “The Alien Stars” is also a compelling, fun, explosive work of space opera pulp.”

Tor.com reviews Firebreak by Nicole Kornher-Stace (Gallery/Saga: S. & S.): “Firebreak is part mystery, part gamer-geek-out, part scream of rage at corporate culture and capitalist greed.”

Book Marks has "5 Reviews You need to Read This Week."

Briefly Noted

The Millions interviews author Brandon Taylor, Filthy Animals (Riverhead: Penguin), about how studying science helped him become a prolific writer and about the evolution of his process. Maggie O’Farrell, Hamnet (Knopf), fills out the Book Marks questionnaire and gives book recommendations. The Los Angeles Times interviews Charles Yu, author of Interior Chinatown (Pantheon: Random House) on combating harmful racist stereotypes.

Daniel Levin writes a piece about the inspiration for his book Proof of Life: Twenty Days on the Hunt for a Missing Person in the Middle East (Algonquin). CrimeReads has the story. Also, Megan Abbott, author of You Will Know Me (Little, Brown, and Company: Hachette), discusses making weird choices with her writing.

Bridget Collins, author of The Betrayals (William Morrow: HarperCollins), writes about her experiences as a tortured artist and how it helps her write. Lit Hub has more. Also, a piece from Dr. David Weill on Exhale: Hope, Healing, and a Life in Transplant (Post Hill: S. & S.) on the importance of storytelling in medicine. Plus, Phoebe Wynne, author of Madam (St. Martin's: Macmillan) writes about how modern women have ancient tales of female strength to inspire their writing.

People announces the Oct 12 release date and a cover reveal for Bourdain: The Definitive Oral Biography by Laurie Woolever (Ecco: HarperCollins) that will contain close to a hundred interviews with people from Anthony Boudain’s life. 

Lit Hub has a cover reveal for Warren Ellis's new book, Nina Simone's Gum (Faber & Faber: Ingram).

Tor.com has an announcement and cover reveal for Paul Cornell’s newest book Rosebud (Tor.com: Macmillan) to be available April 2022. Also, an excerpt from Rachel Griffin’s The Nature of Witches (Sourcebooks). 

USA Today has an article adapted from Nathan Bomey's Bridge Builders: Bringing People Together in a Polarized Age (Polity: Wiley).

Fox News reports on controversy surrounding New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s newest book.

CrimeReads gives “A List of Novels That Aren’t Mysteries But Are Nonetheless Full of Suspense" and "22 New Books by Asian-American and Pacific Islander Authors Perfect For Mystery Readers."

Oprah Daily lists “Books by Colson Whitehead to Read After Watching The Underground Railroad.”

Electric Lit provides “7 Uninhabitable Houses in Fiction.”

Lit Hub posts “Outsiders, Eccentrics, and Misfits: A Reading List," "A Revolutionary Reading List from PEN America's World Voice Festival," and "How to Understand the 1960s in 11 Books."

NYT features a series on "8 Ways a Modern Civil Rights Movement Moved the Culture" including a booklist. Also, NYT advises “Summer Is Coming. Bring a Book.” with a list of recommendations.

Authors on Air

PBS NewsHour discusses Zero Fail: The Rise and Fall of the Secret Service by Carol Leonnig (Random House).

Deadline features Barry Jenkins discussing his adaption of Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad (Anchor: Penguin) and how he sought to give historical context to slavery within the form of a parable.

Reading Women podcast features T Kira Madden, author of Long Live the Tribe of Motherless Girls (Bloomsbury: Macmillan), recommending books by Native Hawaiian authors and speaking about centering Pacific Island voices.

Netflix plans to release adaptations of R.L. Stine’s "Fear Street" book series. People reports.

WarnerMedia will release two DC shows for HBO Max including a Batman series Caped Crusader and My Adventures With Superman. Tor.com has the story.

Lit Hub’s Thresholds podcast features an interview with C Pam Zhang, author of How Much of These Hills is Gold (Riverhead: Penguin), about how drugs influenced her book.

Keen On features Andy Norman’s Mental Immunity: Infectious Ideas, Mind-Parasites, and the Search for a Better Way to Think (Harper Wave: HarperCollins) speaking about protecting minds from invading ideologies. Also, Barrett Swanson, author of Lost in Summerland: Essays (Counterpoint), discusses traveling the U.S. to learn more about living in "post-truth" times.

 Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast features Sanjena Sathian, author of Gold Diggers (Penguin Press) to speak about the American economy and obsession with excess.

Harry Potter and Sorcerer’s Stone celebrates its 20th anniversary with two new television series and a five-night event including HBO Max, TBS, and the Cartoon Network. Entertainment Weekly has more information. 

Richelle Mead’s Vampire Academy book series will receive a television adaptation at Peacock. Variety reports.
 

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