Stephen Curry, Malala Yousafzai, Sir Richard Branson, & Susan Orlean To Oversee New Book Club | Book Pulse

A Private Cathedral by James Lee Burke leads six new books onto the bestseller lists. Reese Witherspoon adds YA titles to her book club. You Should See Me in a Crown by Leah Johnson is her first pick. A new book club idea is announced, featuring Stephen Curry, Malala Yousafzai, Sir Richard Branson, and Susan Orlean. Broken (in the best possible way) by Jenny Lawson, I Want to Be Where the Normal People Are by Rachel Bloom, and Is This Anything? by Jerry Seinfeld are on the way. Death on the Nile gets a trailer.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

A Private Cathedral: A Dave Robicheaux Novel by James Lee Burke (S. & S.) continues its long series run at No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 10 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Choppy Water by Stuart Woods (G.P. Putnam’s Sons: Penguin) sets sail at No. 6 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 8 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Midwife Murders by James Patterson, Richard DiLallo (Grand Central: Hachette) opens at No. 7 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Save Her Soul by Lisa Regan (Bookouture) claims No. 12 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Nonfiction

Finding Freedom: Harry and Meghan and the Making of a Modern Royal Family by Omid Scobie, Carolyn Durand (Dey Street Books: Harper) debuts at No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list and No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Evil Geniuses: The Unmaking of America: A Recent History by Kurt Andersen (Random House) takes No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Antiracist Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon): No. 1 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 15 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo (Seal: Hachette; LJ starred review): No. 2 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House): No. 3 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (New Press): No. 4 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

How To Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (One World: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 5 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah (One World: Random House): No. 6 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): No. 8 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 11 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi (Nation): No. 11 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The L. A. Times reviews The Patron Saint of Pregnant Girls by Ursula Hegi (Flatiron: Macmillan): “a teeming North Sea tale that feels like a feminist Brueghel canvas.”

NPR reviews Black Bottom Saints by Alice Randall (Amistad: Harper): “a gorgeous swirl of fiction, history and motor oil; there are also plenty of cocktail recipes here to make the rougher stories go down a little smoother.” Also, Veritas: A Harvard Professor, a Con Man and the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife by Ariel Sabar (Doubleday: Random House): “It is a sad but fascinating tale, and Ariel Sabar digs out every detail in his engrossing book.”

The NYT reviews My Life as a Villainess by Laura Lippman (William Morrow: Harper): “Regrettably, you leave ... wanting more of something … Essay writing requires that you be not just a gifted writer — which Lippman is — but that you have a point, a purpose, an insight, or at least a memorable conclusion.” Also, Sisters in Hate: American Women on the Front Lines of White Nationalism by Seyward Darby (Little, Brown: Hachette): “superbly written … undermines many common assumptions about the far right.”

Book Marks has “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

Reese Witherspoon adds YA titles to her book club. You Should See Me in a Crown by Leah Johnson (Scholastic) is her first pick.

Publishers Weekly writes about Literati, a subscription service book club that “will be overseen by a quartet of celebrities, including basketball star Stephen Curry, Nobel Laureate Malala Yousafzai, businessman Sir Richard Branson, and author Susan Orlean. Another book club will be run by the Joseph Campbell Foundation.” Bustle has some details too and an interview with Malala Yousafzai.

Bustle notes “Karin Slaughter Was 20 Years Ahead Of Our True Crime Obsession.”

CrimeReads has “Jack Reacher and The Grand Unified Theory of Thrillers,” as written by Malcolm Gladwell.

Several forthcoming books get sales bumps: Broken (in the best possible way) by Jenny Lawson (Henry Holt: Macmillan), I Want to Be Where the Normal People Are by Rachel Bloom (Grand Central: Hachette), and Is This Anything? by Jerry Seinfeld (S. & S.).

NPR’s romance novel feature for August is out.

Book Riot lists “25 Must-Read New Fantasy Books.”

USA Today writes about Kamala Harris: Rooted in Justice by Nikki Grimes, illustrated by Laura Freeman (Atheneum Books for Young Readers: S. & S.).

Entertainment Weekly showcases the forthcoming comic crossover between Locke & Key and The Sandman from IDW and DC Comics.

Time writes “Midnight Sun Can’t Correct Twilight’s Flaws. But It’s a Much Better Book.”

The NYT features Bruce Pascoe, Dark Emu: Aboriginal Australia and the birth of agriculture (Scribe US).

Bitch Media showcases True Story by Kate Reed Petty (Viking: Penguin) and Fighting Words by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley (Dial; SLJ starred review).

CrimeReads has a roundtable discussion with “The Women of Canadian Crime Fiction.”

Shondaland interviews Naji Bakhti, Between Beirut and the Moon (Influx Press).

Yaa Gyasi, Transcendent Kingdom (Knopf; LJ starred review), features in the NYT’s “By the Book” column. I Promise by LeBron James, illustrated by Nina Mata (Harper) gets the showcase in the NYT’s “Inside the List” column.

Entertainment Weekly excerpts People We Meet On Vacation by Emily Henry (Berkley: Penguin).

Tor.com excerpts Noumenon Ultra by Marina J. Lostetter (Harper).

The CBC excerpts The Push by Ashley Audrain (Pamela Dorman Books: Penguin).

The NYT runs the poem “Some Girls” by Alison Luterman, as selected by Naomi Shihab Nye.

HuffPost asks “Can A Book Club Fight Racism?

Vox endorses reading War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy.

Michael Dirda has a “A look back at how Tarzan swung into immortality” for The Washington Post.

The Washington Post writes about how authors are connecting with readers during the pandemic.

Deadline has more on the DC FanDome event, which will now take place on two different days.

Authors on Air

NPR’s Fresh Air interviews Lesley M.M. Blume, Fallout: The Hiroshima Cover-up and the Reporter Who Revealed It to the World (S. & S.).

Timothy Ballard’s Slave Stealers: True Accounts Of Slave Rescues Then & Now is headed to TV. Deadline reports.

The Crown will extend to a sixth season after all. Town & Country reports.

Death on the Nile gets a trailer. It is based on the Agatha Christie novel and premieres on Oct. 23.

The Walking Dead: World Beyond gets a teaser. It debuts on Oct. 4 and spins-off from the TV show, which is in turn based on the comics of the same name.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Be the first reader to comment.

Comment Policy:
  • Be respectful, and do not attack the author, people mentioned in the article, or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  • Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  • Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.
  • Comments may be republished in print, online, or other forms of media.
  • If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.


RELATED 

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?

We are currently offering this content for free. Sign up now to activate your personal profile, where you can save articles for future viewing

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?