Page to Screen, Jun. 7, 2019 | Book Pulse

Penguin is caught in a copyright dispute. Entertainment Weekly is going to monthly issues starting in August. The Waterstones owner is buying Barnes & Noble.  John Edgar Wideman wins the PEN/Malamud Award for Excellence in the Short Story. Adaptations arrive for the week, with a beloved Adriana Trigiani novel coming to the small screen.

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Page to Screen

A few long-awaited sequels arrive today and through the weekend. A beloved Adriana Trigiani novel comes to the small screen.
 
June 7:
Dark Phoenix, based on the comics. Reviews | Trailer.
 
Tales of the City, based on the Tales of the City by Armistead Maupin (Harper). Reviews (scroll down) | Trailer.
 
June 8:
Very Valentine, based on Very Valentine by Adriana Trigiani (Harper). No Reviews | Trailer.
 
June 9:
Big Little Lies, season two, based on Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty (Berkley: Random House). Reviews | Trailer.
 
June 12:
Krypton, season two, spins off from the Superman comics. No reviews | Trailer.
 
Queen Sugar, season four, based on Queen Sugar by Natalie Baszile (Penguin). No reviews | Trailer.
 
Reviews
 
The NYT reviews No Visible Bruises: What We Don’t Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us by Rachel Louise Snyder (Bloomsbury: Macmillan): “powerful … domestic violence has reached epidemic proportions in the United States.” Also, Underland: A Deep Time Journey by Robert Macfarlane (W.W. Norton; LJ starred review): “an epic exploration and examination of darkness and the caverns underground that have captured our imaginations, pulled us downward, housed our dead and allowed us to bury our most violent secrets. It is also a descent into the beauty where dark wisdom is located.” Loudermilk: Or, The Real Poet; Or, The Origin of the World by Lucy Ives (Soft Skull Press): “a clever new satire of writing programs." Grace Will Lead Us Home: The Charleston Church Massacre and the Hard, Inspiring Journey to Forgiveness by Jennifer Berry Hawes (St. Martin’s: Macmillan): “[a] soul-shaking chronicle.” The Children’s Books column is out. So is The Shortlist.
 
Entertainment Weekly reviews On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous by Ocean Vuong (Penguin; LJ starred review) and Patsy by Nicole Dennis-Benn (Liveright: W.W. Norton; LJ starred review), giving both an A- and calling them “essential queer novels.”
 
 
The Washington Post reviews More News Tomorrow by Susan Richards Shreve (W.W. Norton): “a well-tuned mandolin of a gothic adventure.” Also,  How to Forget: A Daughter's Memoir by Kate Mulgrew (William Morrow: Harper): “poignant, sometimes shocking."  The Nonsense Factory: The Making and Breaking of the American Legal System by Bruce Cannon Gibney (Hachette): “most engaging when he applies his business mind to the civil justice system.Upheaval: Turning Points for Nations in Crisis by Jared Diamond (Little, Brown: Hachette; LJ starred review): “Though the analysis stumbles, the virtues of Diamond’s storytelling shine through. Ignore his attempts to force the therapeutic 12-step onto history.”
 
Briefly Noted
 
 
Entertainment Weekly is going to go to monthly issues starting in August. July 5th will be the last weekly offering writes The Hollywood Reporter.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The NYT goes “Inside the List ” with Ask Again, Yes by Mary Beth Keane (Scribner: S. & S.)
 
 
 
Time features On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous by Ocean Vuong (Penguin; LJ starred review) as well as A Queer History of the United States for Young People by Michael Bronski, adapted by Richie Chevat (Beacon Press: Random House; SLJ starred review).
 
Electric Lit showcases Orange World and Other Stories by Karen Russell (Knopf).
 
In forthcoming book news, cover art is out for The Book of Dust: The Secret Commonwealth (Book of Dust, Volume 2) by Philip Pullman (Knopf Books for Young Readers).
 
The Atlantic writes about “Adults Who Treat Reading Like Homework.”
 
Noa Pothoven, the Dutch teenager who died this week, was an author. The NYT has her harrowing story.
 
 
Authors on Air
 
 

 

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Neal Wyatt

nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

Neal Wyatt is LJ’s readers’ advisory columnist, contributing The Reader’s Shelf, Book Pulse, and Wyatt’s World columns. She is the coauthor of The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction, 3d ed. (ALA Editions, 2019). Contact her at nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

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