Page to Screen, Mar. 15, 2019 | Book Pulse

The National Book Critics Circle winners are announced. Avengers: Endgame gets a new trailer. Shrill gets some buzz. Pachinko by Min Jin Lee is headed to Apple.

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Page to Screen

Literary adaptations, a blast from the past, and a new TV show mark highlights of this week's books to movies, and to TV, line up:

Five Feet Apart, based on Five Feet Apart by Rachael Lippincott, with Mikki Daughtry and with Tobias Iaconis (S. & S. Books for Young Readers). Reviews | Trailer

Nancy Drew and the Hidden Staircase, based on the Carolyn Keene novel. Reviews | Trailer

Yardie, based on Yardie by Victor Headley (Pan Macmillan). Reviews | Trailer

Shrill, based on Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman by Lindy West (Hachette). Reviews | Trailer

Out of the Blue, based on Night Train by Martin Amis (Vintage: Random House). Reviews | Trailer

The Aftermath, based on The Aftermath by Rhidian Brook (Knopf; LJ starred review). Reviews | Trailer

Netflix will also air the book based shows Mafia Dolls  and Green Door.

Reviews

The NYT reviews Territory of Light by Yuko Tsushima, translated by Geraldine Harcourt (FSG: Macmillan): "a story that searchingly inhabits the lives of women without sentimentality or self-pity." Also, The NYT crime column is out. "The Shortlist" looks at "Group Biographies [of] Trailblazing Historical Women." The Children's Books column gathers "Picture Book Biographies of Women Who Made History."

NPR reviews The Trial of Lizzie Borden by Cara Robertson (S. & S.): "a deeply satisfying read that will give us plenty of fodder to disagree over who-really­ -dunit." Also, First: Sandra Day O'Connor by Evan Thomas (Random House): "an unvarnished and psychologically intuitive look at the nation's first woman Supreme Court justice, and some of her contradictory characteristics."

The Washington Post reviews What You Have Heard Is True: A Memoir of Witness and Resistance by Carolyn Forché (Penguin): "gripping." Also, Running Home: A Memoir by Katie Arnold (Random House): "poignant and ultimately uplifting." A Woman Is No Man by Etaf Rum (Harper; LJ starred review): "complicates and deepens the Arab American story — a tale as rich and varied as America itself." Louisa on the Front Lines: Louisa May Alcott in the Civil War by Samantha Seiple (Seal Press: Hachette; LJ starred review): "a rich, enlightening tale." The Back Channel: A Memoir of American Diplomacy and the Case for Its Renewal by William J. Burns (Random House): "fascinating ... illustrates so vividly the gap between knowing the right thing and getting it done." If We Can Keep It: How the Republic Collapsed and How it Might Be Saved by Michael Tomasky (Liveright: W.W. Norton): "riveting." The paper also gets Jill Leovy to gather two books about Paul Le Roux.

Briefly Noted

The National Book Critics Circle winners are announced.

Charlie Jane Anders "Recommends 5 Books That Aren't By Men" for Electric Lit.

The NYT writes about Ned Vizzini, Be More Chill (Disney-Hyperion), his death, and legacy, and the "raucous pop-rock, sci-fi musical comedy" based on his book.

The NYT has an essay by Lena Dunham about the concepts of cozy. Also, by Ben H. Winters, an essay on "What Do the Make-Believe Bureaucracies of Sci-Fi Novels Say About Us?"

The L.A. Times interviews Bryan Washington, Lot: Stories (Riverhead: Penguin).

The NYT interviews Roz Chast and Patricia Marx, Why Don't You Write My Eulogy Now So I Can Correct It?: A Mother's Suggestions (Celadon Books: Macmillan).

Deadline Hollywood reports that the comic series Bloodshot will get a new launch from Valiant in September, in advance of the film adaptation arriving in February.

Vanity Fair features Malcolm Gladwell, talking about his podcast.

The Guardian reports on a lost portrait of Charles Dickens.

Bustle has started an advice column featuring authors. Jennifer Weiner answers the first letter.

Time excerpts Einstein's Wife: The Real Story of Mileva Einstein-Maric by Allen Esterson, David C. Cassidy, Ruth Lewin Sime (MIT Press).

LitHub writes about an unpublished letter by Zora Neale Hurston.

The New Yorker reports that "Harper Lee loved to draw" and some of her images are up for auction.

The NYT goes "Inside the List" with Daisy Jones & The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid (Ballantine: Random House).

Authors on Air

Avengers: Endgame gets a new trailer, causing  Entertainment Weekly to ask "Who is Kate Bishop?"

NPR interviews Lindy West, Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman (Hachette). Vanity Fair has a profile as well.

Paste reports on The Lightning Thief: The Percy Jackson Musical, based on the books by Rick Riordan.

Apple is going to adapt Pachinko by Min Jin Lee. Deadline Hollywood reports.

The Hollywood Reporter writes that a prequel to Snowpiercer will publish this fall. This as fans await the TV adaptation of the original graphic novel trilogy.

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Author Image
Neal Wyatt

nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

Neal Wyatt is LJ’s readers’ advisory columnist, contributing The Reader’s Shelf, Book Pulse, and Wyatt’s World columns. She is the coauthor of The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction, 3d ed. (ALA Editions, 2019). Contact her at nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

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