Page to Screen, Dec. 13, 2019 | Book Pulse

The next in the Jumanji franchise arrives, as does a dark version of A Christmas Carol. Robert Kirkman has a new comic in the works. The NYT runs an op-ed with the headline “The Caldecott Medal Needs an International Makeover.” Game of Thrones showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss plan a film based on the graphic novel Lovecraft by Hans Rodionoff. Susan Choi’s Trust Exercise is set as a limited TV series.

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Page to Screen

Today, and over the course of the week to come, the next in the Jumanji franchise arrives, as does a dark version of A Christmas Carol. Plus, returning shows and more holiday films.

Dec. 13:

Jumanji: The Next Level, spinning off of the concept of Jumanji by Chris Van Allsburg (HMH Books for Young Readers). Reviews | Trailer

The Expanse, based on the series by James S. A. Corey. Reviews | Trailer

Marvel’s Runaways, based on the Marvel comic characters. Reviews | Trailer

Dec. 19:

A Christmas Carol, based on the Charles Dickens’s novella. No reviews | Trailer

Ultraviolet, based on The Skeleton Crew: How Amateur Sleuths Are Solving America's Coldest Cases by Deborah Halber (S. & S.). No reviews | Trailer

Christmas on My Mind, based on The Goodbye Bride by Denise Hunter (Thomas Nelson: Harper). No reviews | No trailer

Reviews

The NYT reviews A Bookshop in Berlin: The Rediscovered Memoir of One Woman's Harrowing Escape from the Nazis by Françoise Frenkel (Atria: S. & S.): “As she describes her flight from city to city, the people she encountered live again in brief flickers of too-often-tragic anecdote.”

The Washington Post reviews Radical: The Science, Culture, and History of Breast Cancer in America by Kate Pickert (Little, Brown Spark: Hachette): “an invaluable book.” Also, Build: The Power of Hip Hop Diplomacy in a Divided World by Mark Katz (Oxford): “acting as a watchful chronicler of the remarkable cross-cultural exchanges happening among the artists.” Shatter the Nations: ISIS and the War for the Caliphate by Mike Giglio (PublicAffairs: Hachette): “succeeds as both a firsthand account of the war against the Islamic State and as something of a philosophical rumination on the larger ‘forever war.’The Capital of Basketball: A History of DC Area High School Hoops by John McNamara (Georgetown UP): “Almost no one knows Earl Lloyd. But they should.”

Briefly Noted

The NYT features Jeff VanderMeer, Dead Astronauts (MCD: Macmillan).

People names its “10 Best Books of 2019.”

Booklist announces its “Top of the List” picks for 2019 They have a video.

Electric Lit offers its list of “15 Best Novels of 2019.”

CrimeReads selects the Best Psychological Thrillers of the year.

Tor.com picks the “Best Young Adult Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror of 2019.”

Book Marks offers “The Best Reviewed Books of 2019” Graphic Literature.”

The NYT recommends eleven books for the week.

The Shortlist is out for the André Simon Food and Drink Book Awards for 2019.

In forthcoming book news, Entertainment Weekly has an excerpt and details of Robert Kirkman’s new martial arts comic, Fire Power. The NYT also has the story. Also, Man Booker Prize-winner John Banville has signed a new two-book deal, the first, titled Snow, will publish in 2020 from Hanover Square. The Bookseller reports it will be “the first of Banville’s crime novels to be published under his own name.” Orbit announces Goldilocks by Laura Lam (Orbit: Hachette). Paste announces This is My America by Kim Johnson (Random House Books for Young Readers).

Book Riot has “10 Epic Fantasy Books Like Wheel of Time.”

The Cut interviews poet Precious Okoyomon.

The NYT runs an Op-Ed with the headline “The Caldecott Medal Needs an International Makeover.” It tops a piece that says “The outdated rule that candidates must be American needs to go.”

The Washington Post writes about “The accidental book review that made Jack Kerouac famous.”

The NYT “Sketchbook” considers “Awe-Inspiring Libraries.”

Playwright William Luce has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Authors on Air

Deadline reports that Game of Thrones showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss plan a film based on the graphic novel Lovecraft by Hans Rodionoff. Susan Choi’s Trust Exercise is set as a limited TV series. Tapping the Source by “surf noir writer Kem Nunn” is going to Universal. Netflix is adapting Neal Shusterman’s Game Changer. Amazon is adapting Kathy Hepinstall’s The Book of Polly.

The Hollywood Reporter writes that Amazon plans a Rihanna documentary. Lulu Wang will write, direct, and produce the adaptation of Janice Y.K. Lee’s The Expatriates, for the Nicole Kidman-Amazon production. Also, The Hollywood Reporter critics name the Best Films of 2019, some are based on books.

Popsugar has a list of 34 books getting adapted in 2020.

Henry Cavill Reads the book behind The Witcher. There is also a final trailer. The series debuts next Friday, Dec. 20.

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Neal Wyatt

nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

Neal Wyatt is LJ’s readers’ advisory columnist, contributing The Reader’s Shelf, Book Pulse, and Wyatt’s World columns. She is the coauthor of The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction, 3d ed. (ALA Editions, 2019). Contact her at nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

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