Page to Screen, Jan. 17, 2020 | Book Pulse

Star Trek: Picard airs and Dolittle hits screens. The Dublin Literary Award announces its longlist. Seth Meyers will host the 2020 PEN America Literary Awards. Also, the finalists for the PEN/Jean Stein Book Award are announced. AMC will adapt Stephen King’s Sleeping Beauties. Also on AMC, The Walking Dead: Beyond World will debut on April 12.

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Page to Screen

Star Trek: Picard airs and Dolittle hits screens. Plus a bevy of shows return to The CW.

Jan. 17:

Dolittle, based on The Voyages of Doctor Dolittle by Hugh Lofting. Reviews | Trailer

Fresh off the Boat, based on Fresh Off the Boat: A Memoir by Eddie Huang (Spiegel & Grau: Penguin). Reviews | Trailer

Jan. 19:

Batwoman, based on the DC comic character. No reviews | Trailer

Supergirl, based on the DC comic character. Reviews | Trailer 

Vienna Blood, based on the Liebermann book series by Frank Tallis. Reviews | Trailer

Jan. 20:

Black Lightning, based on the DC comic character. No reviews | Trailer

Jan. 21:

DC’s Legends of Tomorrow, based on DC comics characters. No reviews | Trailer

Jan. 22:                                                                                                                  

Riverdale, based on the Archie comics. No reviews | Trailer

Jan. 23:

The Ghost Bride, based on The Ghost Bride by Yangsze Choo (William Morrow Paperbacks: Harper). No reviews | Trailer

October Faction, based on the comic October Faction: Open Season by Steve Niles, Damien Worm (IDW: Random House). No reviews | Trailer

SAINT SEIYA: Knights of the Zodiac, based on the manga series by Masami Kurumada. Reviews | Trailer

Star Trek: Picard, not based on a book but there are associated titles. No reviews | Trailer

Reviews

The L.A. Times reviews American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins (Flatiron: Macmillan; LJ starred review): “What is great about how hard this novel is to put down is the hope that it will not be put down. Because it also examines, with sensitivity, care, and complexity of thought, immense, soul-obliterating trauma and its aftermath.”

The Washington Post reviews A Very Stable Genius: Donald J. Trump's Testing of America by Philip Rucker, Carol Leonnig (Penguin): “superbly reported and written with clarity, but it is not an easy read. It is relentless, depressing and ultimately numbing.” Also, a review of Agency by William Gibson (Berkley: Penguin): “a book as engaging, thought-provoking and delightful as its predecessor.”

The NYT also reviews A Very Stable Genius: Donald J. Trump's Testing of America by Philip Rucker, Carol Leonnig (Penguin): “this taut and terrifying book is among the most closely observed accounts of Donald J. Trump’s shambolic tenure in office to date.” Also, Cleanness by Garth Greenwell (FSG: Macmillan): “Greenwell’s book is a sort of wistful paean to the place where his protagonist lived in uneasy exile, or learned to grow up, or both.” Saltwater by Jessica Andrews (FSG: Macmillan): “what makes her novel sing is its universal themes: how a young woman tries to make sense of her world, and how she grows up.” Abigail by Magda Szabo, translated by Len Rix (NYRB Classics: Random House): “at once harrowing and mesmerizing.” The Age of Entitlement: America Since the Sixties by Christopher Caldwell (S. & S.): "the real heart of Caldwell’s story is race and civil rights. A more descriptive subtitle might be: “How the Civil Rights Revolution Overturned the Constitution, Divided America and Victimized Whites.” The New Class War: Saving Democracy from the Managerial Elite by Michael Lind (Portfolio: Penguin): “This is a book written from the brain more than from the collision with the complexities of experience. It is a book that would have benefited from getting out there, interviewing people, testing theories against reality, heading down to the border, unearthing documents showing how companies think about the issues in question.” The paper also has a piece on three books about modern Russia.

Book Marks gathers the best reviews of the week.

Awards and Grants

The Dublin Literary Award announces its longlist for 2020.

Seth Meyers will host the 2020 PEN America Literary Awards. Also, the finalists for the PEN/Jean Stein Book Award are announced.

The Porchlight Business Book Award winner is out. Here are the category winners.

The NEA Literature Fellowship Grant recipients are announced.

The 2020 Creative Capital Awards are announced, with authors getting funded.

Briefly Noted

The NYT suggests 11 books for the week.

Tochi Onyebuchi, Riot Baby (Tor.com) selects “7 Books About Surviving Political and Environmental Disasters.”

B&N Sci-Fi & Fantasy blog picks “6 Essential Philip K. Dick Novels.”

USA Today features Hitting a Straight Lick with a Crooked Stick: Stories from the Harlem Renaissance by Zora Neale Hurston (Amistad: Harper).

The NYT prints the poem “Return to Nushagak” by John Brandi, as selected by Naomi Shihab Nye.

Paste excerpts The Summer of Everything by Julian Winters (Interlude Press).

Gizmodo excerpts Given by Nandi Taylor (Wattpad Books: Macmillan).

Entertainment Weekly excerpts Peace Talks: A Novel of the Dresden Files by Jim Butcher (Ace: Penguin).

Time interviews Isabel Allende, A Long Petal of the Sea (Ballantine: Random House). The magazine also has a piece on Steve Inskeep, Imperfect Union: How Jessie and John Fremont Mapped the West, Invented Celebrity, and Helped Cause the Civil War (Penguin), one on Hitting a Straight Lick with a Crooked Stick: Stories from the Harlem Renaissance by Zora Neale Hurston (Amistad: Harper), and on American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins (Flatiron: Macmillan; LJ starred review).

The Guardian interviews Sara Collins, winner of the Costa first novel award for The Confessions of Frannie Langton (Harper).

Entertainment Weekly interviews Laurie Halse Anderson, SHOUT (Viking Books for Young Readers: Penguin).

LJ has an interview with the next director of the IMLS.

Deadline writes about Bang!, a new comic making some noise.

USA Today writes about Fight of the Century : Writers Reflect on 100 Years of Landmark ACLU Cases edited by Michael Chabon, Ayelet Waldman (Avid Reader: S. & S.). The audiobook will feature Patrick Stewart, Samuel L. Jackson and Lucy Liu.

The New Republic has a piece about Amazon publishing commercial fiction by famous authors, and how “publishers should be terrified.”

The NYT has an essay on collecting rare books.

Authors make the NYT “Vows” column.

Christopher Tolkien has died. The NYT has an obituary. The Guardian also has a report.

Roger Scruton has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Also, the NYT runs an obituary for M.C. Beaton who died on Dec. 31.

Authors on Air

Deadline reports that AMC will adapt Stephen King’s Sleeping Beauties. Also on AMC, The Walking Dead: Beyond World will debut on April 12. BBC America plans season 3 of Killing Eve in April (it is buried in The Walking Dead news so scroll down). AMC is working on ideas for a third season of The Terror. DC’s Legends of Tomorrow will get a new villain. The Magnolia platform, the new venture by Chip and Joanna Gaines, launches October 4. Rise and Kill First based on the book by Ronen Bergman is set for HBO and has its first season writer and focus. Author Sandi Toksvig leaves The Great British Bake Off.

NBC is starting a streaming service, Peacock. Fortune has details and The Hollywood Reporter has what is known about the programming thus far.

Chilling Adventurers of Sabrina gets a new trailer.

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