Open Access – Episode 58 – The Oxford Comment [podcast]

Should academic research be available to everyone? How should such a flow of information be regulated? Why would the accessibility of information ever be controversial?



 

Should academic research be available to everyone? How should such a flow of information be regulated? Why would the accessibility of information ever be controversial?

Our topic today is Open Access (OA), the movement defined in the early 2000s to ensure the free access to, and reuse of, academic research on the Internet. In 2004, Oxford University Press became the first publisher to transition a mature journal to OA, and OUP has been a leading publisher of OA journals ever since.

On this episode of The Oxford Comment, Rhiannon Meaden, a Senior Publisher for Journals at OUP, and Danny Altmann, editor-in-chief of Oxford Open Immunology, cover the basics of Open Access, OUP’s drive to disseminate academic research as widely as possible, and how easily-accessible research has impacted various academic fields around the world. This last fact is especially important as the world continues to grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic.

In general, fiction titles are on top of our lending numbers. Together with Braille literature, our audio books in the Digital Accessible Information System (DAISY) format are by far most popular. And our relief products, such as tactile children’s books or tactile maps, are definitely something special. Our collection of Braille music scores for blind professional and non-professional musicians is unique in Germany.

 

 

 



Episode 58 of The Oxford Comment was hosted by Katelyn Phillips, Assistant Marketing Manager at Oxford University Press.
This episode was produced by Steven Filippi (Executive Producer/Editor) with Cassandra Ammerman, Katelyn Phillips, and Ella Percival (Associate Producers). 


 

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