New Bestsellers, Sept. 19, 2019 | Book Pulse

There are 14 new bestsellers this week. The Testaments by Margaret Atwood and The Institute by Stephen King top the charts. The National Book Awards longlist in Poetry is out. The Hunters Point Community Library in Queens gets high praise for design.

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New to the Bestseller Lists

[Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

The Testaments: The Sequel to The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (Nan A. Talese; LJ starred review) debuts at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Institute by Stephen King (Scribner: S. & S.) opens at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 1 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Killer Instinct by James Patterson, with Howard Roughan (Little, Brown: Hachette) takes No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 8 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Titanic Secret by Clive Cussler, Jack Du Brul (G.P. Putnam’s Sons: Penguin) continues the series at No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 6 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Quichotte by Salman Rushdie (Random House; LJ starred review) closes the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list at No. 15.

My Name Is Eva by Suzanne Goldring (Bookouture) closes the USA Today Best-Selling Books list at No. 15.

Nonfiction

Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know about the People We Don't Know by Malcolm Gladwell (Little, Brown: Hachette) debuts at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Education of an Idealist: A Memoir by Samantha Power (Dey Street) lays out its case at No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Only Plane in the Sky: An Oral History of 9/11 by Garrett M. Graff (Avid Reader Press) recounts history at No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 14 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Will My Cat Eat My Eyeballs?: Big Questions from Tiny Mortals About Death by Caitlin Doughty, illustrated by Dianné Ruz (W.W. Norton) answers questions at No. 8 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Lifespan: Why We Age—and Why We Don't Have To by David A. Sinclair, Matthew D. LaPlante (Atria: S. & S.) takes No. 11 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Everything Is Figureoutable by Marie Forleo (Portfolio: Penguin) offers advice at No. 13 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

A Republic, If You Can Keep It by Neil Gorsuch(Crown Forum: Random House) lands at No. 14 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Tools and Weapons: The Promise and the Peril of the Digital Age by Brad Smith, Carol Ann Browne (Penguin) closes the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list at No. 15.

The September audiobook lists are out in the NYT. Once again Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens, read by Cassandra Campbell (Penguin Audio) tops the fiction list, while Educated: A Memoir by Tara Westover, read by Julia Whelan (Random House Audio) is still on top of the nonfiction list.

Reviews

The NYT reviews The Second Founding: How the Civil War and Reconstruction Remade the Constitution by Eric Foner (W.W. Norton; LJ starred review): “scholarship that is disciplined, powerful and moving.” Also, Dunce by Mary Ruefle (Wave Books): “How do we reconcile the boringness of death-in-general with the shock of our own, specific death?

The Washington Post reviews Night Boat to Tangier by Kevin Barry (Doubleday: Random House; LJ starred review): “channels the music in every voice, from lowlife philosopher to slow-footed thug, ponderous wit to fluting child — and the comic genius in everyone, whether unfunny fool or God’s own comedian.” Also, A Mistake by Carl Shuker (Counterpoint): "conveys in gorgeous, heartbreaking detail the shock of catastrophe and the ways we try to make sense of disaster after the fact.” Lost Transmissions: Science Fiction and Fantasy's Untold, Underground, and Forgotten History by Desirina Boskovich (Abrams): “The intelligently curated selection of topics mixes some pretty well-known icons — artist Jack Kirby, writer Angela Carter, musician David Bowie — with some out-of-left-field wonders: manga creator Tsutomu Nihei, Afro­futurist writer Henry Dumas, TV show Space Island One.”

NPR reviews Coventry: Essays by Rachel Cusk (FSG): “She writes like someone who has been burned and has reacted not with self-censorship but with a doubling-down on clarity. She is blazingly intelligent, a deep, tough-minded thinker … at once freewheeling and exquisitely precise.” Doxology by Nell Zink (Ecco: Harper): “a vivid, voicey writer exceptionally gifted at both wryness and character development [but this novel] mostly pokes fun, and pokes some not-so-old social wounds in doing so.”

Briefly Noted

The National Book Awards longlist in Poetry is out. Nonfiction will be announced later today.

The NYT Magazine features Jacqueline Woodson, Red at the Bone (Riverhead)

The NYT talks with Ann Patchett, The Dutch House (Harper).

Louise Erdrich has a new short story in The New Yorker.

Bustle picks11 New Memoirs For Your Fall Reading List.”

CrimeReads has “The Most Anticipated Crime Books of 2019: Part III” (parts one and two).

O: The Oprah Magazine gathers “The Founders of The Latinx Read-A-Thon Share Their Favorite Books for Hispanic Heritage Month” and the magazine also suggests “12 Books to Read If You Are Obsessed with Downton Abbey.”

Book Marks picks “5 Reviews You Need To Read This Week.”

Shondaland features Juliet Takes a Breath by Gabby Rivera (Dial Books: Penguin; SLJ starred review).

Eater interviews Jonathan Safran Foer, We Are the Weather: Saving the Planet Begins at Breakfast (FSG: Macmillan).

The NYT features Leslie Jamison, Make It Scream, Make It Burn: Essays (Little, Brown: Hachette), in its “By the Book” column. Entertainment Weekly has an interview.

BuzzFeed excerpts The World According to Fannie Davis: My Mother's Life in the Detroit Numbers by Bridgett M. Davis (Little, Brown: Hachette).

Entertainment Weekly excerpts Wil Wheaton reading a new edition of John Green’s Looking for Alaska. It is coming out in advance of the Hulu adaptation airing on October 18. The audio will pub. on Sept. 24.

Paste excerpts We Are the Wildcats by Siobhan Vivian (S. & S. Books for Young Readers).

Tor.com excerpts Stealing Thunder by Alina Boyden (Ace: Penguin).

Book Riot has a reading pathway for Colleen Hoover.

The NYT writes about the new Hunters Point Community Library in Queens, calling it “one of the finest public buildings New York has produced this century.” Also in the paper, a piece about writers workshops.

In buzzy book news, John Crist, Untag Me: The Subtle Art of Appearing Better Than You Really Are (WaterBrook: Random House), announces presales of his book on YouTube, sending the book to the top of the Amazon Movers and Shakers charts. It is not out until next May, but The 20th Victim (Women's Murder Club) by James Patterson, Maxine Paetro (Little, Brown: Hachette) is already generating big sales. A feature on the shopping network QVC pushes Martha Stewart's Cookie Perfection: 100+ Recipes to Take Your Sweet Treats to the Next Level: A Baking Book by Editors of Martha Stewart Living (Clarkson Potter: Random House) up the Movers and Shakers charts too.

The Guardian reports on the Stella Count in Australia, which studies gender bias in book reviews.

Walt Whitman gets a stamp. Yahoo has a report.

The Library of Congress is partnering with Poisoned Pen Press: Sourcebooks to publish “a rich and diverse selection of [crime novels] originally published between the 1860s and the 1960s.” The books will pub. in Spring 2020 and the effort starts off with three titles: That Affair Next Door by Anna Katharine Green (1897), The Rat Began to Gnaw the Rope by C. W. Grafton (1943), and Case Pending by Dell Shannon (1960).

Graeme Gibson has died. He was an author and the partner of Margaret Atwood. The Guardian has a report. As does Time.

Lee Salem has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Authors on Air

The NYT offers “Read It Before You See It,” books to read before they hit screens.

Raising Dion gets a trailer.

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