New to the Bestseller Lists, Aug. 15, 2019 | Book Pulse

The Inn by James Patterson with Candice Fox leads nine new bestsellers onto the lists. Barack Obama posts his summer reading list—and sends book sales soaring. The NYT Magazine publishes poems and stories by 16 notable authors that bring African American history to life.

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New to the Bestseller Lists

[Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books]

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

The Inn by James Patterson with Candice Fox (Little, Brown: Hachette) debuts at No. 2 on both the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware (Gallery/Scout Press: S. & S.; LJ starred review) turns the screw at No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 6 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

A Dangerous Man by Robert Crais (G.P. Putnam's Sons: Penguin) continues the series at No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list and No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Outfox by Sandra Brown (Grand Central: Hachette) tracks a conman at No. 4 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list and No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Billionaire Unattainable ~ Mason by J. S. Scott (Independently Published) lands at No. 13 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Love and Death Among the Cheetahs by Rhys Bowen (Berkley: Penguin) investigates at No. 15 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Nonfiction

Trick Mirror: Reflections on Self-Delusion by Jia Tolentino (Random House; LJ starred review) debuts at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Mosquito: A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator by Timothy C. Winegard (Dutton: Penguin) bites at No. 9 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Ghosts of Eden Park: The Bootleg King, the Women Who Pursued Him, and the Murder That Shocked Jazz-Age America by Karen Abbott (Crown: Random House) is on the case at No. 11 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The NYT reviews The Way Through the Woods: On Mushrooms and Mourning by Litt Woon Long, translated by Barbara J. Haveland (Spiegel & Grau: Random House): “moving and unexpectedly funny.” There is a dual review of books considering if “The American West [can] Be Saved” and another looking at novels that “Predict the Surveillance State.” The “Shortlist” column is on “Cycling in Fact and Fiction.”

The Washington Post reviews An American Sunrise: Poems by Joy Harjo (W.W. Norton): “If you read only one book of poems this summer, make it [this one].” Also, The Last Widow by Karin Slaughter (William Morrow): "this book’s gore makes it something of a surreal beach read.” Selling Nostalgia: A Neurotic Novel by Mathew Klickstein (Permuted Press: S. & S.): “shows that the magic isn’t diluted only by mass production; it’s also diluted by the realities of the artists behind it.”

NPR reviews An American Sunrise: Poems by Joy Harjo (W.W. Norton): “Her work is … a stark reminder of what poetry is for and what it can do: how it can hold contradictory truths in mind, how it keeps the things we ought not to forget alive and present.” Also, Lithium: A Doctor, a Drug, and a Breakthrough by Walter A. Brown (Liveright: W.W. Norton): “Brown makes a more nuanced point: That some pioneers are set apart, not by their stubbornness or seat-of-the-pants circumstances, but by qualities that the scientific world usually ignores.” How To Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (One World: Random House; LJ starred review): “a book that is not only an essential instruction manual but also a memoir of the author's own path from anti-black racism to anti-white racism and, finally, to antiracism.”

Briefly Noted

Barack Obama has posted his summer reading list. He leads with Toni Morrison. Many of the books on his list, including those by Haruki Murakami, Lauren Wilkinson, Ted Chiang, Colson Whitehead, and Hope Jahren are soaring on Amazon.

The NYT Magazine publishes poems and stories by 16 writers asked to bring "consequential moments in African-Afmerican history to life."

Aimee Bender recommends “Guts” by Kimberly King Parsons for Electric Lit. Also, an interview with Amanda Goldblatt, Hard Mouth (Counterpoint).

CrimeReads picks "6 New True Crime Books to Read This August."

Entertainment Weekly excerpts The Last Odyssey by James Rollins (William Morrow: Harper).

Vanity Fair features Game of Thrones: The Costumes by Michele Clapton, Gina McIntyre (Insight: S. & S.).

Bitch Media spotlights Bassey Ikpi, I'm Telling the Truth, but I'm Lying: Essays (Harper).

Time has an article based on End Times: A Brief Guide to the End of the World by Bryan Walsh (Hahcette).

Marie Arana, Silver, Sword, and Stone: Three Crucibles in the Latin American Story (S. & S.) goes “By the Book” for the NYT.

LitHub has two pieces spotlighting Sarah Broom and The Yellow House (Grove Press). Also, a piece on "Marley Dias, Tireless Promoter of Diversity in Literature."

Henry Louis Gates Jr. wins the 2019 Chicago Tribune Literary Award for lifetime achievement. Rebecca Makkai, The Great Believers (Viking: Penguin), and Sarah Smarsh, Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth (Scribner: S. & S.) win the Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize.

N.K. Jemisin is named as the spokesperson for the 2019 Indies First program.

CrimeReads features "The Great Boundary-Breaking Women of Fiction Celebrating 10 strong women who refused to conform and who struggled to find their place in the world."

Michael Dirda appreciates the way books look and feel for The Washington Post. Related, The Verge reports that Marvel is getting a Folio Society edition.

Publishing Perspectives updates the tariffs issue on books from China, in light of the selective delay announced this week by the Trump administration.

In more international book news, here is a report on the simply fantastic tradition of the rentrée littéraire, "When France goes book crazy" and also news that the BBC plans a year-long celebration of literature (the radio features should be accessible online, but the TV shows will be harder to get - unless a US partner or a streaming service picks them up).

LitHub marks the coming end of the week with "5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week: From the Wild West to the Big Easy." Also, a "Point/Counterpoint" about The Catholic School by Edoardo Albinati, translated by Antony Shugaar (FSG: Macmillan; LJ starred review).

Authors on Air

Deadline Hollywood reports that Amazon has added cast members to The Wheel of Time. Entertainment Weekly has a round-up of known facts about the series.

Marvel is creating a new scripted podcast that adapts Marvels. Entertainment Weekly has details.

The Hollywood Reporter has a feature on the season 3 finale of Handmaid’s Tale. Also a feature on Phoebe Waller-Bridge, star of Fleabag and writer of Killing Eve (the TV show) and now, for James Bond.

Esquire writes about season two of The Haunting of HIll House, with is based on Henry James's The Turn of the Screw.

Mary Beth Keane, Ask Again, Yes (Scribner: S. & S.), will be on The Tonight Show tonight. Her book is the show's summer read.

Star Wars: Resistance gets a trailer. So does 13 Reasons Why.

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