New Bestsellers, June 13, 2019 | Book Pulse

City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert leads 13 new titles onto the bestseller lists. Idaho by Emily Ruskovich wins the International Dublin literary award. More summer reading lists arrive. Book clubs get attention.

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New to the Bestseller Lists

[Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books]

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert (Riverhead: Penguin) surveys a life at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 4 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Shadow Warrior by Christine Feehan (Berkley: Penguin) opens at No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Unsolved by James Patterson, David Ellis (Little, Brown: Hachette) lands at No. 3 on both on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Fall; or, Dodge in Hell by Neal Stephenson (William Morrow: Harper; LJ starred review) debuts at No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 9 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous by Ocean Vuong (Penguin; LJ starred review) writes a letter at No. 6 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Skin Game by Stuart Woods, Parnell Hall (G.P. Putnam's Sons: Penguin) continues the series at No. 9 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 8 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Searching for Sylvie Lee by Jean Kwok (William Morrow) makes the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list at No. 11.

Mostly Dead Things by Kristen Arnett (Tin House: W.W. Norton) tells the tale at No. 14 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

The Friends We Keep by Jane Green (Berkley: Penguin) meets up at No. 15 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Nonfiction

Siege: Trump Under Fire by Michael Wolff (Henry Holt: Macmillan) dishes at No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 7 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Naturally Tan: A Memoir by Tan France (St. Martin’s: Macmillan) surveys a life at No. 10 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Conservative Sensibility by George F. Will (Hachette Books; LJ starred review) holds its line at No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Every Man a Hero: A Memoir of D-Day, the First Wave at Omaha Beach, and a World at War by Ray Lambert, Jim DeFelice (William Morrow: Harper; LJ starred review) remembers heroes at No. 13 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

In audio, Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens, read by Cassandra Campbell (Penguin Audio) tops the June fiction list while Educated: A Memoir by Tara Westover, read by Julia Whelan (Random House Audio) leads in nonfiction.

Reviews

The NYT has Chelsey Johnson review Patsy by Nicole Dennis-Benn (Liveright: W.W. Norton; LJ starred review): “a novel that continually and subtly defies predictability as it tells a vital and remarkable life story ... surprises and illuminates.” Also reviewed in the paper, The Dreamt Land: Chasing Water and Dust Across California by Mark Arax (Knopf; LJ starred review): “exhaustive, deeply reported.” Reckoning: The Epic Battle Against Sexual Abuse and Harassment by Linda Hirshman (HMH): “a lively account of a social revolution that’s still in the making, but anyone seeking a deeper understanding of why the current moment has been such a long time coming may wish that she had done a little more reckoning of her own.”

NPR reviews Recursion by Blake Crouch (Crown: Random House; LJ starred review): "doesn't just ask you to consider the power, it wants you to see the consequences. All of them. It wants you to see the damage that travels in the wake of such choices. The bodies. The nightmares."

The Washington Post reviews Fleishman Is in Trouble by Taffy Brodesser-Akner (Random House): “Believe the hype … even better than we were promised.” Also, Bunny by Mona Awad (Viking: Penguin): “glorious …deliciously evil.”

Briefly Noted

Idaho by Emily Ruskovich (Random House) wins the International Dublin literary award, the richest literary prize. The novel is Ruskovich’s debut. The Guardian reports.

Reckonings: Legacies of Nazi Persecution and the Quest for Justice by Mary Fulbrook (Oxford) wins the Wolfson History Prize.

The finalists for the John W. Campbell Memorial Award for best science fiction novel have been announced.

O, The Oprah Magazine picks “The Best Books by Women of Summer 2019” and offers excerpts of many.

Entertainment Weekly gathers the “15 biggest (and best) YA books of the summer.”

Mental Floss suggests “27 Books to Read in Summer 2019.”

Bustle asks “What Makes The Perfect Book Club Read?

The Washington Post features I Like to Watch: Arguing My Way Through the TV Revolution by Emily Nussbaum (Random House).

Jezebel interviews Laura R. Fisher, Reading for Reform: The Social Work of Literature in the Progressive Era (Minnesota Univ.).

The Washington Post explores “how Aladdin came to be.”

Michael Rumaker has died. Lambda Literary has an obituary.

Authors on Air

NPR interviews Charles Fishman, One Giant Leap: The Impossible Mission That Flew Us to the Moon (S. & S.; LJ starred review).

PBS NewsHour interviews N.K. Jemisin, including the inspirations that power her writing. Also, PBS NewsHour interviews Nathan Englander, kaddish.com (Knopf).

Deadline Hollywood reports that East of the Mountains by David Guterson is getting adapted. Netflix is developing an adaptation of The Chronicles of Narnia. New Looney Tunes cartoons are heading to screens. Lobo, a spin-off of Krypton is in the works for TV.

Pennyworth gets a trailer.

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