New Bestsellers, May 23, 2019 | Book Pulse

The Night Window: A Jane Hawk Novel by Dean Koontz and Howard Stern Comes Again by Howard Stern lead the new bestsellers this week. Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker gets the Vanity Fair treatment. George R.R. Martin might have just broken all his rules and announced a publishing window for the next GOT book.

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New to the Bestseller Lists

[Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books]

Fiction

The Night Window: A Jane Hawk Novel by Dean Koontz (Bantam: Random House) opens at No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 4 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Never Game by Jeffery Deaver (G.P. Putnam's Sons: Penguin) begins play at No. 11 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 15 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Theodore Boone: The Accomplice by John Grisham (Dutton Books for Young Readers: Penguin) takes the case at No. 14 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Nonfiction

Howard Stern Comes Again by Howard Stern (S. & S.) debuts at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The British Are Coming: The War for America, Lexington to Princeton, 1775-1777 by Rick Atkinson (Henry Holt, Macmillan; LJ starred review) starts the war at No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Sacred Duty: A Soldier's Tour at Arlington National Cemetery by Tom Cotton (William Morrow: Harper) opens at No. 8 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Everything Is F*cked: A Book About Hope by Mark Manson (Harper) counters hopelessness at No. 8 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Full Count: The Education of a Pitcher by David Cone, with Jack Curry (Grand Central: Hachette) plays ball at No. 13 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The NYT reviews Mean Girl: Ayn Rand and the Culture of Greed by Lisa Duggan (Univ. California): "Duggan paints Rand as cynical and shrewd in some ways, and hapless and naïve in others."

NPR reviews Theodore Roosevelt for the Defense: The Courtroom Battle to Save His Legacy by Dan Abrams (Hanover Square Press: Harper): "a must-read for anyone with a deep interest in the 26th president, or in First Amendment law, but any reader with an affection for American history will find something to admire in this book." Also, Empty Words by Mario Levrero, translated by Annie McDermott (Coffee House Press): "Happily, Levrero delivers."

Briefly Noted

The NYT launches its Summer Books Preview with what its critics will be reading.

The Verge has "13 new science fiction and fantasy books to check out in late May."

Book Riot picks some "New Books By You Favorite Authors Coming Out This Year."

The Washington Post gathers books on Shakespeare.

The Forward Prizes for Poetry announces its shortlist.

The Miles Franklin Literary Award issues its longlist.

The Westchester Library Association announces the Anne Izard Storyteller's Choice Award.

The Guardian interviews Naomi Wolf, Outrages: Sex, Censorship, and the Criminalization of Love (HMH).

The Washington Post features Judith Jones, the Knopf editor best, but not only, remembered for accepting Julia Child's cookbook.

Bustle explores "How Claudia Kishi Inspired A Generation Of Asian American Writers" via The Baby-sitters Club books.

George R.R. Martin kinda-sorta promises a new due date for The Winds of Winter on his blog. As io9 writes, readers might expect it by August 2020. But don't place bets yet; this would not be the first promised deadline to pass without a book to read and Martin has become rather resolute about not setting deadlines.

Eve Ensler goes "By the Book" for the NYT.

Natalie Portman responds to Moby's assertion in his memoir about dating her. The Guardian explains.

Donald Trump Jr. is writing a book. It will be published by Center Street: Hachette. The NYT has detials.

Marie Kondo is writing a new book, for children entitled Kiki & Jax: The Life-Changing Magic of Friendship (Crown Books for Young Readers: Random House). Bustle has details.

The NYT features hotels, restaurants, and more that use books as decor, and the companies that sells them by the foot.

The NYT goes "Road Tripping With Diana Kennedy."

Sourcebooks "has sold a significant minority-ownership stake to Penguin Random House" according to a press release issued by both publishers.

Judith Kerr has died. The Guardian has an obituary.

Authors on Air

Vanity Fair goes all in on Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker. There is a cover story. A photo guide. A story on the Knights of Ren, one on Kylo Ren and Rey's connection, and one on C-3PO.

Deadline Hollywood reports that Lisa Grunwald’s Time After Time is set for the movies, even before the book hits shelves. Trent Dalton's Boy Swallows Universe is set for TV. Erin Entrada Kelly’s Newbery Award-winning Hello, Universe is headed to Netflix.

PBS NewsHour launches a new Arts site called Canvas, with book coverage.

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Neal Wyatt

nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

Neal Wyatt is LJ’s readers’ advisory columnist, contributing The Reader’s Shelf, Book Pulse, and Wyatt’s World columns. She is the coauthor of The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction, 3d ed. (ALA Editions, 2019). Contact her at nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

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