New Bestsellers, Apr. 4, 2019 | Book Pulse

Eleven new bestsellers march onto the lists. The Joker gets a trailer. The Guardian has a feature story about "the long fight against racism in romance novels."

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New to the Bestseller Lists

[Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books]

Fiction

The Cornwalls Are Gone by James Patterson, with Brendan DuBois (Little, Brown: Hachette) debuts at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and takes the 5-spot on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Supermarket by Bobby Hall (S. & S.) debuts at No 2. on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The American Agent: A Maisie Dobbs Novel Jacqueline Winspear (Harper; LJ starred review) claims No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and slides onto the USA Today Best-Selling Books list at No. 15.

Tiamat's Wrath by James S.A. Corey (Orbit: Hachette) lands at No. 6 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No 3. on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Wild Card by Stuart Woods (G.P. Putnam's Sons: Penguin) opens at No. 8 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 6 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Last Second by Catherine Coulter, J.T. Ellison (Gallery: S. & S.) saves the day at No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 7 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

We Are The Gardeners by Joanna Gaines (Thomas Nelson) nabs No. 10 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Bones She Buried by Lisa Regan (Bookouture) claims No. 12 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Dark Tribute: An Eve Duncan Novel by Iris Johansen (St. Martin's: Macmillan) continues the series at No. 15 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Nonfiction

Inside the Empire: The True Power Behind the New York Yankees by Bob Klapisch, Paul Solotaroff (HMH) swings for the fences at No. 13 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society by Nicholas A. Christakis (Little, Brown: Hachette) makes the case at No. 14 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The April NYT Audio lists are out. Still topping fiction is Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens, read by Cassandra Campbell (Penguin Audio). Becoming written and read by Michelle Obama (Random House Audio) still tops nonfiction.

Reviews

The NYT reviews Women's Work: A Reckoning with Work and Home by Megan K. Stack (Doubleday: Random House): "Her wan conclusion to an otherwise fearless book feels like a bit of a put-on and a bit of a cop-out." Also, Love Your Enemies: How Decent People Can Save America from the Culture of Contempt by Arthur C. Brooks (Broadside: Harper): "beholds America’s 21st-century tribal feuds ... with a clear, intelligent eye and a hospitable attitude that is rightly focused on the spiritual dimensions of the problem." What Doesn't Kill You Makes You Blacker: A Memoir in Essays by Damon Young (Ecco: Harper): "These essays toggle between Young’s dueling narrative styles, and in the end the reader cannot be certain which is the definitive one." The paper also has a dual review addressing "Bangkok's Swirl of Remembering and Forgetting."

USA Today reviews The Spectators by Jennifer duBois (Random House), giving it 3.5 stars and writing "a treatise on the media’s power and a finely-wrought example of intimate pain."

The Washington Post reviews Boy Swallows Universe by Trent Dalton (Harper): "hypnotizes you with wonder, and then hammers you with heartbreak."

The L.A. Times reviews Lights All Night Long by Lydia Fitzpatrick (Penguin): "remarkable."

NPR reviews Stony the Road: Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. (Penguin): "a fascinating social and intellectual history ... It's an absorbing and necessary look at an era in which the hard-fought gains of African-Americans were rolled back by embittered Southern whites." The review also highlights Dark Sky Rising: Reconstruction and the Dawn of Jim Crow (Scholastic Focus) by Henry Louis Gates Jr., Tonya Bolden (Scholastic; SLJ starred review). A Wonderful Stroke of Luck by Ann Beattie (Viking: Penguin): "Beattie's skepticism is on full display in the novel; unfortunately, the excellent writing and arch sense of humor that made her previous books so great are not." The Last Stone: A Masterpiece of Criminal Interrogation by Mark Bowden (Atlantic Monthly Press): "a riveting, serpentine story about the dogged pursuit of the truth, regardless of the outcome or the cost."

Briefly Noted

The Indies Choice/E.B. White Read-Aloud Award finalists are announced.

Bart Moeyaert wins the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award

The Guardian has a feature story about "the long fight against racism in romance novels."

Vulture picks "7 New Books You Should Read This April."

CrimeReads selects the best psychological thrillers of the month.

The NYT speculates that Game of Thrones will never end, but spin-off endlessly the way of Star Wars.

Paste features two new books on Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young.

Shondaland interviews Mira Jacob, Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations (One World: Random House; SLJ starred review). Also, the site offers an excerpt of I Miss You When I Blink: Essays by Mary Laura Philpott (Atria: S. & S.).

USA Today features Henry Winkler. The paper also reports that Marlon Bundo will return in Marlon Bundo's Day in the Nation's Capital by Charlotte Pence, illustrated by Karen Pence (Regnery Kids).

The Atlantic interviews Megan K. Stack, Women's Work: A Reckoning with Work and Home (Doubleday: Random House).

L.A.Times interviews Ruth Reichl, Save Me the Plums: My Gourmet Memoir (Random House; LJ starred review). Vulture has an interview as well and in the piece Reichl shares the news that her book Comfort Me With Apples is headed to Netflix.

The Washington Post appreciates Extraordinary Popular Delusions: And the Madness of Crowds by Charles Mackay (Prometheus).

NYT prints a poem by Naomi Shihab Nye.

L.A. Times reports on new words added to Dictionary.com.

The NYT suggest ways to increase reading with bite-sized books (or really, just reading in small chunks).

The Verge reports that Scribd will begin offering original content, including books, to subscribers.

Authors on Air

Tor.com has a list of "Almost Every SFF/Horror/Comic Book Adaptation in the Works."

Entertainment Weekly reports that Stephen King's short story "Gray Matter" will be adapted for Creepshow.

NPR interviews Box Brown, Cannabis: The Illegalization of Weed in America (First Second: Macmillan). Also, an interview with Nathan Englander, kaddish.com (Knopf). On NPR's Fresh Air, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Stony the Road: Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow  (Penguin).

Deadline Hollywood reports that Linwood Barclay's Never Look Away is headed to TV. I Know This Much Is True by Wally Lamb is set for HBO. The life and works of Maya Angelou are getting turned into what is hoped will be a Broadway show. Wanderers, a forthcoming work by Chuck Wendig, is getting adapted for TV. The forthcoming Fall and Rise: The Story of 9/11 by Mitchell Zuckoff is headed for TV too.

Joker gets a trailer.

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Author Image
Neal Wyatt

nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

Neal Wyatt is LJ’s readers’ advisory columnist, contributing The Reader’s Shelf, Book Pulse, and Wyatt’s World columns. She is the coauthor of The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction, 3d ed. (ALA Editions, 2019). Contact her at nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

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