New Bestsellers, Mar. 14, 2019 | Book Pulse

Greg Iles and Rachel Hollis join 12 new bestsellers this week. Major money awards are announced and the National Book Critics Circle Awards come out tonight. Alicia Keys and Oprah Winfrey team up.

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New to the Bestseller Lists

[Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books]

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

Cemetery Road by Greg Iles (William Morrow: Harper) opens at No 2. on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Daisy Jones & The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid (Ballantine: Random House) takes the stage at No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Silent Night by Danielle Steel (Delacorte: Random House) nabs the No. 4 spot on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 5 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Malta Exchange by Steve Berry (Minotaur: Macmillan) lands at No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 9 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Island of Sea Women by Lisa See (Scribner: S. & S.) dives in at No. 9 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Unto Us a Son Is Given by Donna Leon (Atlantic Monthly Press) debuts at No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

You Are My Happy by Hoda Kotb, illustrated by Suzie Mason (Harper) takes No. 14 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Nonfiction

Girl, Stop Apologizing: A Shame-Free Plan for Embracing and Achieving Your Goals by Rachel Hollis (HarperCollins Leadership) debuts at No. 1 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Case for Trump by Victor Davis Hanson (Basic Books: Hachette) is No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 6 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Universal Christ: How a Forgotten Reality Can Change Everything We See, Hope For, and Believe by Richard Rohr (Convergent Books: Random House) opens at No. 11 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Mostly Sunny: How I Learned to Keep Smiling Through the Rainiest Days by Janice Dean (Harper) is No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Madame Fourcade's Secret War: The Daring Young Woman Who Led France's Largest Spy Network Against Hitler Lynne Olson (Random House; LJ starred review) makes the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list at No. 15.

Reviews

The NYT reviews The Trial of Lizzie Borden by Cara Robertson (S. & S.): "enthralling." Also, Good Will Come From the Sea by Christos Ikonomou, translated by Karen Emmerich (Archipelago: Steerforth): "Greece’s most original and perceptive chronicler of his country’s fears and yearnings."

NPR reviews The Lady from the Black Lagoon: Hollywood Monsters and the Lost Legacy of Milicent Patrick by Mallory O'Meara (Hanover Square Press: Harper): "chatty, impassioned." Also, Giraffes on Horseback Salad: Salvador Dali, the Marx Brothers, and the Strangest Movie Never Made by Josh Frank, Tim Heidecker, and Manuela Pertega (Quirk Books: Random House): "Don't even try to understand; just revel in the weirdness, along with the wonderful photographs and other archival material." (both reviews on on the same page, scroll down for the second). Squad by Mariah MacCarthy (FSG: Macmillan): "a short, highly concentrated blast of a book that revels in all the best and worst feelings of high school."

USA Today reviews Elegant Defense, An: The Extraordinary New Science of the Immune System: A Tale in Four Lives by Matt Richtel (William Morrow), giving it 3 stars, writing it is "so rich and engaging. He wants to push us, and be warned: You will be pushed."

The Washington Post reviews Memories of the Future by Siri Hustvedt (S. & S.): "lovely .... wonderful ... Her sentences dance with the elation of a brilliant intellect romping through a playground of ideas , and her prose is just as lively when engaged in the development of characters and story." Also, Pagan Light: Dreams of Freedom and Beauty in Capri by Jamie James (FSG: Macmillan): "if you treat the book like a languorous, tipsy walking tour of a locale laden with history, he proves a most entertaining guide."

Literary Pay Day

The Windham-Campbell prizes have been announced. The Guardian has further details.

Paul Gilroy wins the Holberg Prize. The NYT has the story.

The National Book Critics Circle Awards will be announced this evening. Here are the finalists.

Briefly Noted

Entertainment Weekly reports that Sesame Street will celebrate its 50th anniversary with a new book, Sunny Day: A Celebration of Sesame Street by Various (Random House Books for Young Readers).

Alicia Keys will publish her next book, a memoir, with Oprah Winfrey's imprint at Flatiron. There is a video to announce the news.

Insight Editions (an imprint of S. & S.) is publishing a set of expensive Game of Thrones illustrated books, showcasing the storyboard art for the HBO series. io9 has details. The first, Game of Thrones: The Storyboards by Michael Kogge and William Simpson, comes out in late May.

CrimeReads picks "The Best New Thrillers This Month."

The Washington Post writes about The Catalogue of Shipwrecked Books: Christopher Columbus, His Son, and the Quest to Build the World's Greatest Library by Edward Wilson-Lee (Scribner: S. & S.).

io9 excerpts Tochi Onyebuchi’s War Girls (Random House).

Entertainment Weekly features Ladies Who Punch: The Explosive Inside Story of "The View" by Ramin Setoodeh (Thomas Dunne: Macmillan), and the breaking news that Rosie O’Donnell alleges her father sexually abused her.

The NYT has a list of "Books That Expose College Admissions Mania." The Washington Post offers a take on the scandal as well.

Bitch Media spotlights SHOUT by Laurie Halse Anderson (Viking Books for Young Readers: Penguin). Also, Laurie Halse Anderson goes "By The Book."

Arthur A. Levine leaves Scholastic to set up his own indie publishing company. Shelf Awareness has details.

The Guardian reports that a letter by Harper Lee, in which she rages against her home town, has sold at auction for five figures.

USA Today reports that Amazon has removed books from its site that tout fake autism cures. The move comes after Wired wrote about the books and Amazon earlier in the week.

Authors on Air

An Anonymous Girl by Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen is headed to the USA network. Variety has the details.

Marvel's Shang-Chi is headed to the movies. The Hollywood Reporter has a feature.

NPR interviews Henry Eliot, Follow This Thread: A Maze Book to Get Lost In (Three Rivers Press: Random House).

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Neal Wyatt

nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

Neal Wyatt is LJ’s readers’ advisory columnist, contributing The Reader’s Shelf, Book Pulse, and Wyatt’s World columns. She is the coauthor of The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction, 3d ed. (ALA Editions, 2019). Contact her at nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

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