New Bestsellers, Feb. 28, 2019 | Book Pulse

Topping the charts, The Threat: How the FBI Protects America in the Age of Terror and Trump by Andrew G. McCabe leads nine new bestsellers this week. The Booker Prize gets a sponsor. Michelle Obama and John Green are teaming up for a BookTube short series.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

New to the Bestseller Lists

[Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books]

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

The Chef by James Patterson, Max DiLallo (Little, Brown: Hachette) opens at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 5 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Never Tell by Lisa Gardner (Dutton: Penguin; LJ starred review) takes the No. 3 spot on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 6 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Devil's Daughter: The Ravenels meet The Wallflowers by Lisa Kleypas (Avon: Harper) balances the books at No. 4 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Mission Critical by Mark Greaney (Berkley: Penguin) makes its point at No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 8 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Nonfiction

The Threat: How the FBI Protects America in the Age of Terror and Trump by Andrew G. McCabe (St. Martin's: Macmillan) debuts at No. 1 on both the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Spearhead: An American Tank Gunner, His Enemy, and a Collision of Lives in World War II by Adam Makos (Ballantine: Random House) studies history at No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming by David Wallace-Wells (Tim Duggan Books: Random House) issues a warning at No. 6 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Never Enough: The Neuroscience and Experience of Addiction by Judith Grisel (Doubleday: Random House) makes the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list at No. 11.

Keto Diet: Your 30-Day Plan to Lose Weight, Balance Hormones, Boost Brain Health, and Reverse Disease by Josh Axe (Little, Brown: Hachette) suggests a plan at No. 14 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Feeding You Lies: How to Unravel the Food Industry's Playbook and Reclaim Your Health by Vani Hari (Hay House) fills its plate at No. 15 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Reviews

Laura Van Den Berg reviews The Heavens by Sandra Newman (Grove Press) for the NYT, calling it "heady and elegant" and writing it is "something of a chameleon, a strange and beautiful hybrid. Just when you think you’re standing on firm footing, the ground shifts." Also reviewed, Nervous States: Democracy and the Decline of Reason by William Davies (W.W. Norton): "wide-ranging yet brilliantly astute." Empires of the Weak: The Real Story of European Expansion and the Creation of the New World Order by Jason Sharman (Princeton): "succeeds admirably."

NPR reviews Lost Children Archive by Valeria Luiselli (Knopf): "ratifies the power of great fiction to expose our deepest desires, fears, and hopes as we stumble through a world we share with others, yet barely understand." Also, We Set the Dark on Fire by Tehlor Kay Mejia (Katherine Tegen Books: Harper; SLJ starred review): "a book so timely it hurts."

Award News

The Irma Black Award Semi Finalists are announced.

The Booker Prize has found a sponsor. The Guardian reports it is "Silicon Valley billionaire, philanthropist and author Michael Moritz and his wife Harriet Heyman." Their charitable foundation will fund the award for five years. The rules (including the eligibility of US authors) and the prize money will stay as currently formulated. The name of the award will simply be The Booker Prize. The Guardian further reports that Moritz was born in Wales but now lives in San Francisco and has written a biography of Steven Jobs and co-authored a book about former Manchester United manager Alex Ferguson. The story ends with a summary of the many changes UK book awards have undergone recently, as well as a bit more on the disappointment many UK authors feel about allowing US authors to vie for Booker honors.

Briefly Noted

Entertainment Weekly reports that a sequel to Michael Crichton's The Andromeda Strain is forthcoming this November. It will be called The Andromeda Evolution and will be published by Harper.

Also in forthcoming book news, EW notes another Obama and Biden mystery comes in out in July, Hope Rides Again: An Obama Biden Mystery by Andrew Shaffer (Quirk Books: Random House). The magazine offers an excerpt.

NPR features The Good Immigrant: 26 Writers Reflect on America edited by Nikesh Shukla, Chimene Suleyman (Little, Brown: Hachette).

NPR also spotlights Everything Change, Volume II, edited by Angie Dell and Joey Eschrich (Arizona State University).

The Atlantic runs an essay by Akiko Busch, adapted from How to Disappear: Notes on Invisibility in a Time of Transparency (Penguin).

The Washington Post has a piece by Scott Huler, A Delicious Country: Rediscovering the Carolinas along the Route of John Lawson's 1700 Expedition (Univ. of North Carolina) about what happens once an author finishes (sort of) a book.

Bitch Media features Real Queer America: LGBT Stories from Red States by Samantha Allen (Little, Brown: Hachette).

Paste showcases the best book covers of February.

The Millions picks "Ten Essential Tales of Terror by Women."

The Washington Post has a story on co-writing pairs.

Edward O. Wilson answers the NYT "By the Book" questions.

The NYT is reporting that the producer behind the new Broadway version of To Kill A Mockingbird is seeking to shut down all other performances of the play and is thus hurting smaller productions and troupes.

Authors on Air

John Green is going to moderate a free YouTube original "BookTube" series. Each of the seven-episodes (all less than 10 minutes long) will featuring Michelle Obama. Variety has details.

The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern gets its director, Geremy Jasper (PattiCake$). The Villains book series by Serena Valentino is headed to Disney's new streaming service. Agatha Raisin gets a third season at Acorn TV. Deadline Hollywood has details on all.

The Hollywood Reporter says that the film adaptation of Are You Afraid of the Dark has been taken off the calendar at Paramount, with no news of if it will ever return. On the better news front, Clifford the Big Red Dog will debut Nov. 2020.

Ferrante Fever gets a trailer.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Author Image
Neal Wyatt

nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

Neal Wyatt is LJ’s readers’ advisory columnist, contributing The Reader’s Shelf, Book Pulse, and Wyatt’s World columns. She is the coauthor of The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction, 3d ed. (ALA Editions, 2019). Contact her at nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

Be the first reader to comment.

Comment Policy:
  • Be respectful, and do not attack the author, people mentioned in the article, or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  • Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  • Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.
  • Comments may be republished in print, online, or other forms of media.
  • If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.


RELATED 

TOP STORIES

LIBRARY EDUCATION

Kids are using VR to explore worlds and create new ones

COMMUNITY FORM

Kids are using VR to explore worlds and create new ones

COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT

Kids are using VR to explore worlds and create new ones

Get connected. Join our global community of more than 200,000 librarians and educators.