New to the Bestseller Lists, Jan. 10, 2019 | Book Pulse

Verses for the Dead by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child leads the way as three new titles hit the bestsellers lists. The Story Prize finalists are announced. Michael Chabon's The Yiddish Policemen's Union is getting adapted.

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New Bestsellers

[Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

Verses for the Dead by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child (Grand Central: Hachette): Debuts at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 4 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list

A Delicate Touch by Stuart Woods (G.P. Putnam: Penguin): Opens at No. 9 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 11 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list

The Boy by Tami Hoag (Dutton: Penguin): Takes the No. 11 spot on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

There are no new nonfiction bestsellers.

Reviews

The NYT reviews Anne Frank's Diary: The Graphic Adaptation by Anne Frank (Text), David Polonsky (Illustrations), Ari Folman (Adapted by) (Pantheon: Random House): "a stunning, haunting work of art that is unfortunately marred by some questionable interpretive choices." Also, a dual review of books that consider misinformation.

The Washington Post reviews Black Enough: Stories of Being Young & Black in America edited by Ibi Zoboi (Balzer + Bray: Harper): "nuanced, wide-ranging." Also, Late in the Day by Tessa Hadley (Harper): "With each new book by Tessa Hadley, I grow more convinced that she’s one of the greatest stylists alive."

NPR reviews Hollywood's Eve: Eve Babitz and the Secret History of L.A. by Lili Anolik (Scribner: S. & S.): "Anolik's biography, as a whole, is much more its successes than it is its failures. Down the road, Babitz's readers will surely be treated to a biography of her from a more disinterested party."

Briefly Noted

The Story Prize finalists have been announced: A Lucky Man by Jamel Brinkley (Graywolf: Macmillan), Your Duck Is My Duck by Deborah Eisenberg (Ecco: Harper), and Florida by Lauren Groff (Riverhead: Penguin).

The Guardian survey "comics and graphic novels of 2019."

Nylon selects "6 Great Books To Read This January."

Sarah Jessica Parker takes to Instagram to promote the next book in her SJP for Hogarth imprint, Golden Child by Claire Adam.

The NYT reports on how finding lapis lazuli fossilized on a medieval nun's teeth has upended the conventional history regarding who created illuminated manuscripts.

Entertainment Weekly interviews Lili Anolik, Hollywood's Eve: Eve Babitz and the Secret History of L.A. (Scribner: S. & S.). LitHub has a story on Anolik, too.

Recode interviews Molly Barton, CEO of Serial Box (the ebook/audiobook app that delivers books in small, serialized, pieces).

The NYT features Linn Ullmann, Unquiet (W.W. Norton).

Dani Shapiro, Inheritance: A Memoir of Genealogy, Paternity, and Love (Knopf), answers the NYT "By the Book" questions.

Vulture writes about the sale of Millions.

The Atlantic features James Baldwin.

Michael Dirda considers two "gently comic and unjustly forgotten British literary fantasies" for The Washington Post. The paper also has a piece on Machiavelli's The Prince.

LitHub 's Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast discusses how literary publicity works.

Authors on Air

Michael Chabon's The Yiddish Policemen's Union is getting adapted. Chabon and Ayelet Waldman wrote the series script. Sometimes I Lie by Alice Feeney (Flatiron: Macmillan) is getting adapted as well. Sarah Michelle Gellar is set to star and Ellen DeGeneres is executive producing. Deadline Hollywood has details on both stories.

PBS NewsHour interviews Sohaila Abdulali, What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape (The New Press; LJ starred review). Also, Sandeep Jauhar, Heart: A History (FSG: Macmillan), offers writing advice.

BuzzFeed picks 18 adaptions to lookout for in 2019.

CrimeReads selects "The Most Anticipated Crimes Shows of 2019."

Kamala Harris, The Truths We Hold: An American Journey (Penguin), will be on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.

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Neal Wyatt

nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

Neal Wyatt is LJ’s readers’ advisory columnist, contributing The Reader’s Shelf, Book Pulse, and Wyatt’s World columns. She is the coauthor of The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction, 3d ed. (ALA Editions, 2019). Contact her at nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

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