National Book Awards To Be Held In Person | Book Pulse

The National Book Awards will be held as an in-person event with some virtual elements. Honors for The Sisters in Crime Australia shortlist authors, 2021 Ned Kelly Awards shortlist, and Ursula K. La Guin with a U.S. Postal Service Forever stamp. Black Ice by Brad Thor, False Witness by Karin Slaughter, and I Alone Can Fix It: Donald J. Trump’s Catastrophic Final Year by Carol Leonnig and Philip Rucker top the best sellers list.  Interviews with Ed Simon of An Alternative History of Pittsburgh, Laia Jufresa of Umami, Melinda Wenner Moyer of ​​How to Raise Kids Who Aren't Assholes: Science-based Strategies for Better Parenting—From Tots to Teens, Pik-Shuen Fung of Ghost Forest, and Matthew Specktor of Always Crashing in the Same Car: On Art, Crisis, and Los Angeles, California.

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Awards & News

 

 

 

 

 

 

The National Book Awards will be held as an in-person event with some virtual elements.

The Sisters in Crime Australia shortlists are announced. 

The Australian Crime Writers Association 2021 Ned Kelly Awards shortlist is announced.

Ursula K. La Guin is being honored with a U.S. Postal Service Forever stamp. Oregon Live has more information.

New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

Fiction

Black Ice by Brad Thor (Atria: Emily Bestler Books) debuts at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

False Witness by Karin Slaughter (Morrow; LJ starred review) shows up to No. 6 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list and No. 8 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Nonfiction

I Alone Can Fix It: Donald J. Trump’s Catastrophic Final Year by Carol Leonnig and Philip Rucker (Penguin) rises to No. 1 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list and No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list. 

Reviews

NYT reviews The Great Mistake by Jonathan Lee (Knopf): “There are readers one can imagine somewhat disappointed by “The Great Mistake,” but that’s not at all to say that the novel is disappointing; it’s just a way of delineating what this very subtle book is and isn’t. From a thumbnail sketch, it might sound built to appeal to fans of sweeping historical fiction set in New York City. But while there are plenty of detailed treats for those types — fishmongers and street vendors and hackney coachmen; an elephant getting stuck in the doorway of a Coney Island police station; an infant lost in a poker game — this is far from Gotham porn.”

Oprah Daily reviews A Farewell to Gabo and Mercedes: A Son's Memoir of Gabriel García Márquez and Mercedes Barcha by Rodrigo Garcia (HarperVia): “Death is a hallmark of A Farewell to Gabo and Mercedes, but a gentle ironic humor also suffuses the book.”

Tor.com reviews She Who Became the Sun by Shelley Parker-Chan (Tor; LJ starred review): “Drawing inspiration from the historical Red Turban Rebellion, She Who Became the Sun (first of the Radiant Emperor duology) reimagines of the rise of Zhu Yuanzhang—from peasant to founder of the Ming Dynasty—and the concurrent collapse of the Mongol-led Yuan Dynasty… if Zhu had been the unnamed daughter instead.”

Locus Magazine reviews All Our Hidden Gifts by Caroline O’Donoghue (Walker: Candlewick): “This darkly exciting novel takes off from that moment, and includes all sorts of paranormal twists and turns, plus a very frightening look at contemporary culture conflicts.”

Book Marks has "5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week."

Briefly Noted

David Sedaris has asked Tracey Ullman to narrate his newest release A Carnival of Snackery (Little, Brown, & Co.) to come out on October 5. Entertainment Weekly has the story. Erik Larson will be coming out with a new fiction audiobook No One Goes Alone to be released by Penguin Random HouseNYT has more.

Torrey Peters, Detransition, Baby (Books on Tape; LJ starred review), will have previously unpublished novellas reissued by Random House in 2022. Lit Hub has more info. Also, Sally Cabot Gunning writes a piece about her latest Painting the Light (Morrow) on "the creative relationship between writers and visual artists."

Mena Suvari, The Great Peace (Hachette) speaks with USA Today about how she "makes peace with abuse, addiction in new book." Also, Adrian Miller, author of Black Smoke: African Americans and the United States of Barbecue (University of North Carolina; LJ starred review) "sheds light on BBQ's Black history."

Ed Simon speaks with Martha Anne Toll on The Millions about his newest book An Alternative History of Pittsburgh (Belt: Ingram) about how “writing is thinking.” Laia Jufresa, Umami (Oneworld) has a conversation with Bix Gabriel for Catapult about how she cooks like she writes.

Glen Erik Hamilton writes about how Seattle inspired his book, Island of Thieves (Morrow; LJ starred review) for CrimeReads. Also, Brad Parks Unthinkable (Thomas & Mercer: Amazon) writes about his newest and the absence of stay-at-home dads in crime novels.

Marie Benedict and Victoria Christopher Murray, The Personal Librarian (Berkley; LJ starred review) fill out the Book Marks Questionnaire

Tor.com has a cover reveal for Scorpica (S. & S.) by G.R. Macallister.

Prince Harry’s spokesperson denies royal’s second book will be released upon Queen Elizabeth’s death.” Fox News has more.

Los Angeles Times has “As another brutal fire season rages, 4 new books bring context and consolation.”

Lit Hub gives “The 10 Best Book Covers of July," "Being Seen: 5 Great Books That Capture the Essence of Coming of Age," and profiles “Winner of This Year’s Insider Prize, Selected by Mitchell S. Jackson.”

Oprah Daily provides “These Are the Books Longlisted for the 2021 Booker Prize.”

CrimeReads lists “13 Must-Read Laugh-Out-Loud Mysteries,” “Five Thrillers That Will Make You Delete Your Social Media Accounts Forever,” "Five International Crime Novels to Read in July," and “Rules for Writing Romantic Suspense.”

Tor.com has “Five Supporting Characters Who Outshine the Protagonist.”

NYT covers the best seller list with "Everything Old is New Again and Other Best-Selling Wisdom" featuring The Paper Palace by Miranda Cowley Heller (Riverhead), Malibu Rising by Taylor Jenkins Reid (Ballantine: Random House), Black Ice by Brad Thor (Atria: Emily Bestler Books), and False Witness by Karin Slaughter (Morrow; LJ starred review). Plus, a list of "Graphic Novelists Who Show Us What Loneliness Means."

Authors on Air

Delroy Lindo will star in the adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s Anansi Boys (Morrow) for the upcoming Amazon series. Variety has the scoop.

Melinda Wenner Moyer, author of How to Raise Kids Who Aren't Assholes: Science-based Strategies for Better Parenting—From Tots to Teens (GP Putnam's Sons: Penguin) speaks on the Keen On podcast about helping build a “better, fairer, stronger world.” Also, Patrick Wyman, The Verge: Reformation, Renaissance, and Forty Years that Shook the World (Twelve: Hatchette) speaks about the "Great Divergence" that separates Western Europe from the rest of the world.

Pik-Shuen Fung, Ghost Forest (One World: Random House; LJ starred review) has a conversation with Kendra Winchester on the Reading Women podcast about narrating her own audiobook.

Matthew Specktor, author of Always Crashing in the Same Car: On Art, Crisis, and Los Angeles, California (Tin House) speaks on the Otherppl podcast about the complications of extreme success.

David Rintoul gives a run down of the crimes in Alexander McCall Smith’s The Man with the Silver Saab (Random House) for the Behind the Mic with AudioFile Magazine podcast.

Ursula Burns speaks on Just the Right Book with Roxanne Coady about her book Where You Are Is Not Who You Are (Amistad: HarperCollins) and "the dangers of exceptionalism."

We Have Ways of Making You Talk podcast features an interview with Calum Douglas, author of The Secret Horsepower Race (Tempest: Casemate) about WWII and the important part played by engineering.



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