Mexicona Launches Imagination and Future Award | Book Pulse

The first Mexican virtual convention of speculative fiction Mexicona, launches Premio Imaginación y Futuro with an awards list. Author Zhao Lei, of The Stars wins the 11th Chinese Nebula Awards and Julia Baird of Phosphorescence wins the 2021 Australian Book Industry Awards (ABIAs). Also, the 2021 Women’s Prize for Fiction shortlist has been announced. More tension for Simon & Schuster as the recent book deals with former members of the Trump administration draw protests. A Gambling Man by David Baldacci, Out of Many, One: Portraits of America's Immigrants by George W. Bush, Crying in H Mart by Michelle Zauner, and World Travel: An Irreverent Guide by Anthony Bourdain & Laurie Woolever top the best sellers list. F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is getting turned into a musical by Florence Welch of Florence + the Machine. Christina Jackson and Y’lan Noel to star in an adaptation of Sam Greenlee’s book The Spook Who Sat By The Door

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.
 

Awards & News

 

 

 

 

 

 

The first Mexican virtual convention of speculative fiction Mexicona, launches Premio Imaginación y Futuro with an awards list. Locus Magazine reports.

The Future Worlds Prize for Fantasy and Science Fiction Writers of Colour award opens (formerly the Gollancz and Rivers of London BAME SFF).

Zhao Lei, author of The Stars (People’s Literature Publishing House), wins the 11th Chinese Nebula Awards. China.org.cn reports. 

The 2021 Women’s Prize for Fiction shortlist announced.

Phosphorescence: On awe, wonder and things that sustain you when the world goes dark by Julia Baird (Random House) wins the 2021 Australian Book Industry Awards (ABIAs) and other winners announced.

Buzz Books Editor Panel to feature virtual interviews with, excerpts from, and galleys for featured authors such as Jessamine Chan of The School for Good Mothers (S. & S.), James Kennedy of Dare to Know (Quirk), Juhea Kim of Beasts of a Little Land (Ecco), and others on May 19.

Former Washington Post executive editor Martin Baron will publish a book about former President Trump with Flatiron.

More tension for Simon & Schuster as the recent book deals with former members of the Trump administration draw protests. NYT has the story.

New Title Bestsellers

 

 

 

 

 

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

Fiction

A Gambling Man by David Baldacci (Grand Central Publishing) scores No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Crown of Gilded Bones by Jennifer L. Armentrout (Brillance Audio) shines at No. 1 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Lover Unveiled by J.R. Ward (Gallery Books) debuts at No 5. on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list and No. 8 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

State of Affairs by Marie Force (HTJB, Inc.) engages No. 9 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Man Who Lived Underground by Richard Wright (Library of America) rises to No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Nonfiction

Out of Many, One: Portraits of America's Immigrants by George W. Bush (Crown) is singled out at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 7 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Crying in H Mart by Michelle Zauner (Knopf) debuts at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

World Travel: An Irreverent Guide by Anthony Bourdain & Laurie Woolever (Ecco: HarperCollins; LJ starred review) eats up No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Blood and Treasure: Daniel Boone and the Fight for America’s First Frontier by Tom Clavin and Bob Drury (St. Martin’s) shines at No. 10 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

F*ck It, I’ll Start Tomorrow by Action Bronson as told to Rachel Wharton (Abrams) starts at No. 11 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Goodbye, Again: Essays, Reflections, and Illustrations by Jonny Sun (Harper Perennial; LJ starred review) says hello to No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Madam Speaker: Nancy Pelosi and the Lessons of Power by Susan Page (Twelve) calls No. 13 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Cook This Book by Molly Baz (Clarkson Potter: Random House) heats up to No. 14 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Reviews

NPR reviews Abigail Tucker’s Mom Genes: Inside the New Science of Our Ancient Maternal Instinct (Gallery; LJ starred review): “Tucker's deep dive into the scientific literature on new motherhood and her visits to labs unlocking mysteries of motherhood enliven her writing. Unfortunately, she renders the experience of new motherhood as such a draconian, impairing biological transformation that these positive aspects can't offer balance.”

Entertainment Weekly reviews Great Circle by Maggie Shipstead (Knopf): “But in a moment when our quarantined worlds have become so small — whole months measured not in continents or nautical miles but square inches of living room carpet — Great Circle offers more than just wanderlust; it feels like a liberation by proxy, too.”

Locus Magazine reviews Charlie Jane Anders’ Victories Greater Than Death (Tor Teen: Macmillan): “Anders has gone to some lengths to work out a consistent space opera universe that will no doubt unfold in subsequent volumes – this one ends on what amounts to an after-the-credits cliffhanger – and to introduce into this universe a more diverse and gender-fluid set of scrappy kids than those ancient predecessors would have dreamed of.” Also, a review of Lost in the Never Woods by Aiden Thomas (Swoon: Macmillan): “Fans of the classic will love this more serious consideration of Neverland’s origins, but anyone who likes a smart novel should be ready to dive in.”

Tor.com reviews Fugitive Telemetry by Martha Wells (Tordotcom): “Fugitive Telemetry is as self-contained and action-packed as the previous books, however it leans into its mystery plotline in a subtly different way.”

Los Angeles Times reviews Rachel Cusk’s Second Place (Farrar; LJ starred review): “Cusk is still banging up against the same concerns that have animated her work for decades — the compromises of motherhood, the catharsis of travel, how we demarcate our private space.”

The Washington Post reviews Lawrence Block’s A Writer Prepares (LB Productions): “There’s a lot more to “A Writer Prepares,” which is chockablock with pen portraits of fast-buck operators, eccentrics and fellow writers (notably Donald E. Westlake).” Also, Timothy Brennan’s Places of Mind: A Life of Edward Said (Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux: Macmillan): “One of the strengths of the book’s exhausting focus on intellectual production and academic theory is to underscore that Said was never a polemicist with easy positions.”

NYT reviews Michael Mechanic’s Jackpot: How the Super-Rich Really Live - and How Their Wealth Harms Us All (S. & S.): “Mechanic offers such a fluent survey of the vast literature on historical inequality — indicating that he’s not only read that literature but understood its implications — that I was surprised by his upbeat ending, when he suggests that transformative change could happen if only more rich people had a change of heart.” Also, Hearing Homer's Song: The Brief Life and Big Idea of Milman Perry by Robert Kanigel (Knopf: Random House): "What is certain is that Parry’s premature death highlights a great irony: The scholar who brought oral epic to the world’s attention left behind so little of his own voice." Plus, The God Equation by Michio Kaku (Doubleday): "As the title suggests, Kaku’s latest concern is with what he calls the “holy grail” of all science, the metaphorical “umbilical cord” of our infant universe, whenever it was (or wasn’t) born out of the alleged multiverse."

Book Marks has "5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week."

Briefly Noted

N.K. Jemisin gives an update on the sequel to The City We Became (Orbit: Hachette; LJ starred reivew) and more on her new MasterClass. Entertainment Weekly reports. Also, a cover reveal for Rebekah Weatherspoon’s A Thorn in the Saddle (Dafina: Random House), inspired by Beauty and the Beast.

The Millions interviews Elissa Washuta, author of White Magic (Tin House) about what it is like to be an essayist.

Oprah shared how she learned to end disagreements with neuroscience on her first virtual book tour stop for What Happened to You (Flatiron Books: Macmillan). Oprah Daily has the story and information about more book tour events.

CrimeReads features an article by Michael Nava, author of Lies With Man (Amble Press) about surveillance and infiltration by the Los Angeles Police Department on activist groups. Plus, Blaine Harden goes on a deeper dive of his book Murder at the Mission: A Frontier Killing, Its Legacy of Lies, and the Taking of the American West (Viking: Penguin; LJ starred review).

Tor.com shares an excerpt of A.M. Strickland's In the Ravenous Dark (Imprint: Macmillan).

LitHub shares a piece “On the Counterintuitive Appeal of the Literary Time Loop.” Also, Julia Turshen, author of Simply Julia: 110 Easy Recipes for Healthy Comfort Food (Harper Wave) talks about her book pitch. Lastly, Jhumpa Lahiri speaks to the controversy about the translation of Amanda Gorman’s The Hill We Climb (Viking: Penguin). Plus, an interview with Brandi Carlile, author of Broken Horses (Crown) about her childhood religions experiences. And, an interview with Anjali Enjeti, author of The Parted Earth (Hub City Press: Ingram) about religious-based extremism, racism, white supremacy, and misgyny. Laura Hankin, author of A Special Place for Women (Berkley) reflects on her writing process.

Lil’ Kim has written a memoir to be published by Hachette Books on Nov 2 titled The Queen Bee.  People reports and includes an interview with the author.

Bob Odenkirk’s book Comedy Comedy Comedy Drama will be published by Random House in 2022, Deadline announces.

NYT By the Book features Olivia Laing and her book piles.

NYT follows up on motivational speaker and author, Rachel Hollis of Girl, Stop Apologizing: A Shame-Free Plan for Embracing and Achieving Your Goals (HarperCollins).

LitHub has "The 11 Best Book Covers of April" and "The State of the Crime Novel in 2021, Part 2: Writing During the Pandemic."

The Guardian provides "11 books to pull you out of a reading rut."

NYT gives "15 New Books to Watch For in May" and graphic novels that illustrate resilience.

AudioFile’s Best Audiobooks of April is announced.

Authors on Air

Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is getting turned into a musical by Florence Welch of Florence + the Machine. Entertainment Weekly reveals. Variety also reports on this announcement. LitHub publishes it’s take on this newsNYT weighs in.

Tor.com reveals that the Marvel series Ironheart is headed to preproduction. Shadow and Act reports that Chinaka Hodge will be the head writer.

Christina Jackson and Y’lan Noel to star in adaptation of Sam Greenlee’s book The Spook Who Sat By The Door (Wayne State University Press). Shadow and Act reports.

Best Director Chloé Zhao speaks with Variety about directing Marvel’s Eternals. Also, Joseph Fiennes talks about shooting The Handmaid’s Tale during the pandemic. Plus, a review of Tom Clancy’s Without Remorse

Gal Gadot will star in an adaptation of Catriona Silvey’s book Meet Me in Another Life (William Morrow: HarperCollins). Deadline reports. Plus, an adaptation of Emma Donoghue’s The Wonder (Little, Brown and Company) to star Florence Pugh.

Thresholds interviews Ahmed Naji, author of Thin Places (FSG: Macmillan), about his life as an exiled writer, living in America.

PBS American Masters highlights the work of Amy Tan.

Brandi Carlile, author of Broken Horses (Crown), to be featured on Seth Meyers show tomorrow night.

The Drew Barrymore Show will feature Oprah Winfrey tomorrow night.


Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Comment Policy:
  • Be respectful, and do not attack the author, people mentioned in the article, or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  • Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  • Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.
  • Comments may be republished in print, online, or other forms of media.
  • If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.


RELATED 

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?

We are currently offering this content for free. Sign up now to activate your personal profile, where you can save articles for future viewing

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?