Two Book Awards Name Names, Mar. 13, 2019 | Book Pulse

The Man Booker International and the American Academy issue longlist or award winners. A new Trump book, this time focused on his daughter and son-in-law, is getting buzzy coverage. Three notable adaptations are in the works. Aladdin gets a new, musical, trailer.

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Awards

The Man Booker International prize issues its longlist.

The American Academy of Arts and Letters announces its award winners.

Reviews

The NYT reviews Figuring by Maria Popova (Pantheon: Random House): "strange and lovely." Also, Madame Fourcade's Secret War: The Daring Young Woman Who Led France's Largest Spy Network Against Hitler Lynne Olson (Random House; LJ starred review): "gripping." Last Days at Hot Slit: The Radical Feminism of Andrea Dworkin edited by Andrea Dworkin, Johanna Fateman, Amy Scholder (Semiotext(e): MIT Press): "shows that the caricature of her as a simplistic man-hater, a termagant in overalls, could only be sustained by not reading what she actually wrote."

NPR reviews Pocahontas and the English Boys: Caught between Cultures in Early Virginia by Karen Ordahl Kupperman (NYU Press): "this new take on her life and times answers questions essential to our time" Also, The Club by Takis Würger, translated by Charlotte Collins (Grove Press): "tackles hot-button issues of privilege and toxic masculinity, to mixed results. As a thriller, it's competent; as a literary novel, it's well-meaning but underwhelming." Sea People: The Puzzle of Polynesia by Christina Thompson (Harper; LJ starred review): "undoubtedly a deeply interesting read, and at points incredibly moving."

USA Today reviews The Malta Exchange by Steve Berry (Minotaur Books: Macmillan; LJ starred review), giving it two stars and deciding it "doesn't do much thrilling."

The Washington Post reviews the newest buzzy Trump book, Kushner, Inc.: Greed. Ambition. Corruption. The Extraordinary Story of Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump by Vicky Ward (St. Martin's Press: Macmillan): "a dark and mostly one-sided portrait, one with which the Kushner and Trump families no doubt will disagree." Also, The Last Act by Brad Parks (Dutton: Penguin; LJ starred review): "may be his best yet." The Parade by Dave Eggers (Knopf) with the headline it is "a heartbreaking work of staggering cynicism."

Briefly Noted

Bustle picks "17 Must-Read Books by WOC ... Coming Out During Women's History Month."

CrimeReads selects "March's Best International Crime Fiction."

Time interviews Rachel Hollis, Girl, Stop Apologizing: A Shame-Free Plan for Embracing and Achieving Your Goals (HarperCollins Leadership).

Entertainment Weekly interviews Lisa Jewell, The Family Upstairs (Atria: S. & S.).

Bustle features The Left Hand of Darkness: 50th Anniversary Edition by Ursula K. Le Guin, with a forward by David Mitchell and an afterward by Charlie Jane Anders (Ace: Random House). The Paris Review celebrates the novel as well.

Time spotlights Pocahontas and the English Boys: Caught between Cultures in Early Virginia by Karen Ordahl Kupperman (NYU Press).

Entertainment Weekly excerpts Prince: The Last Interview: and Other Conversations by Prince, with an introduction by Hanif Abdurraqib (Melville House) and offers a first look at World Citizen comics.

Time features When the Irish Invaded Canada: The Incredible True Story of the Civil War Veterans Who Fought for Ireland's Freedom by Christopher Klein (Doubleday: Random House).

In forthcoming book news, Howard Stern is writing a new book, Howard Stern Comes Again (S. & S.). It is already trending on Amazon. Also, Cecelia Ahern is writing a sequel to PS, I Love You, set for 2020. Entertainment Weekly has details on both books.

The comic book series Second Coming, which DC cancelled last month, will publish after all, from AHOY Comics. The satirical series features Jesus Christ as a character. The NYT explains the controversy and the comic.

LitHub has a list of top earning authors.

Announced via a press release, Chronicle Books has created a new nonfiction imprint, Chronicle Prism.

Art historian and biographer John Richardson has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Authors on Air

Stephen King and Peter Straub’s The Talisman is headed to the movies. Entertainment Weekly has details.

Amy Adams is developing Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver for HBO. Netflix is adapting All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr. No Exit by Taylor Adams is headed to the big screen. Deadline Hollywood reports.

PBS NewsHour has advice from Naomi Alderman.

Karamo Brown, Karamo: My Story of Embracing Purpose, Healing, and Hope (Gallery Books: S. & S.) will be on The Daily Show tonight.

Aladdin gets another trailer.

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