Books to Hand | Wyatt's World

There’s a lot going on, and it pays to have a book to hand for readers caught up in the news cycle, as well as those wishing to escape its grasp. Here are five titles to keep patrons involved in hot topics, and one that allows them to slip away into the pure joy of reading on long summer days.

There’s a lot going on, and it pays to have a book to hand for readers caught up in the news cycle, as well as those wishing to escape its grasp. Here are five titles to keep patrons involved in hot topics, and one that allows them to slip away into the pure joy of reading on long summer days. Confirmation Bias
 

  • The Great Successor: The Divinely Perfect Destiny of Brilliant Comrade Kim Jong Un by Anna Fifield (PublicAffairs).
    North Korea, one of the most closed countries in the world, is now taking center stage. Here, Washington Post Beijing bureau chief Fifield details the life of dictator Kim Jong Un, providing a meticulously detailed look at his reign.
     
  • The Ice at the End of the World: An Epic Journey into Greenland's Buried Past and Our Perilous Future by Jon Gertner (Random).
    Gertner takes readers to one of the ground-zero locations of climate change in this engaging report that recounts explorers, scientists, and climatologists who have traveled to the land of ice on a quest to discover what lies beyond. It then delves into the findings of experts today who are studying the fallout  awaiting as that ice melts.
     
  • The Wedding Party by Jasmine Guillory (Penguin). 
    For readers seeking a break from the news, suggest this latest from one of the fastest rising stars in romance.  Guillory simply delights and is already a LibraryReads hall of famer. This third book in her "Wedding Date" series features a classic enemies-to-lovers plot. The fourth, Royal Holiday, is due out in October.  
     
  • Confirmation Bias: Inside Washington’s War over the Supreme Court, from Scalia’s Death to Justice Kavanaugh by Carl Hulse (Harper).
    As Americans hold their breath as each new Supreme Court decision is made, New York Times chief Washington Correspondent Hulse digs into the dysfunctional trauma of filling a justice's vacant seat.
     
  • This Land Is Our Land: An Immigrant's Manifesto by Suketu Mehta (Farrar).
    Mehta dives in and takes a suitably global look another heated and divisive subject dominating the news worldwide, writing with force on the benefits of immigration.

 

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Neal Wyatt

nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

Neal Wyatt is LJ’s readers’ advisory columnist, contributing The Reader’s Shelf, Book Pulse, and Wyatt’s World columns. She is the coauthor of The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction, 3d ed. (ALA Editions, 2019). Contact her at nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

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