Literary News Makers, Apr. 24, 2019 | Book Pulse

The Night Mail by Hoda Barakat wins the International Prize for Arabic Fiction. Cribsheet: A Data-Driven Guide to Better, More Relaxed Parenting, from Birth to Preschool by Emily Oster gets buzzy. Stephen King's Salem's Lot is getting adapted. Crime fiction gets a deep-dive conversation.

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Literary News Makers

The Night Mail by Hoda Barakat wins the International Prize for Arabic Fiction. The Bookseller reports she is just the second woman to win the prize. Here is the longlist.

Oneworld has already secured the English translation, due out in the UK in 2020.

PBS NewsHour features the autobiography of Omar Ibn Said, now in the Library of Congress. It is thought to be "one of the only one of its kind, the original words of a Muslim American slave."

In an important genre read, CrimeReads begins a "The State of the Mystery" conversation in which the 2019 Edgar Award nominees "Address the Genre's Most Pressing Questions."

Reviews

NPR reviews The Moment of Lift: How Empowering Women Changes the World by Melinda Gates (Flatiron: Macmillan): "equal parts memoir and mission statement, inspirational slide deck and social critique ... long on heartwarming anecdotes, short on argument." Also, Nanaville: Adventures in Grandparenting by Anna Quindlen (Random House): "The best parts of Nanaville are the charming vignettes of Quindlen's solo time with her grandson."

The NYT reviews Walking on the Ceiling by Aysegül Savas (Riverhead: Penguin; LJ starred review): "[a] delicate, melancholy debut." Also, Greek to Me: Adventures of the Comma Queen by Mary Norris (W.W. Norton): "one of the most satisfying accounts of a great passion that I have ever read." The Lost Gutenberg: The Astounding Story of One Book's Five-Hundred-Year Odyssey by Margaret Leslie Davis (TarcherPerigee: Penguin): "composing a lively tale of historical innovation, the thrill of the bibliophile’s hunt, greed and betrayal." The Unwanted: America, Auschwitz, and a Village Caught In Between by Michael Dobbs (Knopf): "weaves the tales of their declining fortunes with a carefully researched account of American attitudes and policies toward Europe’s Jewish refugees."

The Washington Post reviews Courting Mr. Lincoln by Louis Bayard (Algonquin: Workman): "arresting."

Briefly Noted

Book Riot has a reading pathway for Beverly Jenkins.

The L.A. Times suggests 7 novels for May.

The Washington Post gathers "Three inspiring books for young readers, from preschool to high school."

PBS NewsHour spotlights "5 books about Silicon Valley you need to read right now."

Book Riot suggests "10 Upcoming Adult Fantasy Novels."

O Magazine offers "Their All-Time Favorite Reads" and Oprah says that she is reading The Choice: Embrace the Possible by Edith Eva Eger (Scribner: S. & S.).

Eula Biss writes about the measles and vaccines for The Cut.

NPR features Cribsheet: A Data-Driven Guide to Better, More Relaxed Parenting, from Birth to Preschool by Emily Oster (Penguin). The Cut also has a story, asking "Is This the Millennial Parent Book?"

The Atlantic spotlights The Great American Sports Page: A Century of Classic Columns from Ring Lardner to Sally Jenkins: A Library of America Special Publication edited by John Schulian (Library of America: Penguin).

Grub Street interviews Ecco publisher Daniel Halpern about Anthony Bourdain and the forthcoming book Anthony Bourdain Remembered by CNN.

Shondaland interviews Melinda Gates, The Moment of Lift: How Empowering Women Changes the World (Flatiron: Macmillan). The site also has an interview with Sally Rooney, Normal People (Hogarth: Random House; LJ starred review).

The Guardian interviews Jared Diamond, Upheaval: Turning Points for Nations in Crisis (Little, Brown: Hachette).

PBS NewsHour speculates on how Shakespeare died.

The Washington Post reconsiders Robinson Crusoe on its 300th anniversary.

USA Today reports on the upcoming 200th anniversary celebrations of "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow."

Skyhorse forms a new imprint, Arcade CrimeWise, focused on crime fiction. PW has details.

Maureen Corrigan writes an essay for The Washington Post on Linda Fairstein and the Mystery Writers of America controversy.

Authors on Air

Deadline Hollywood reports that Stephen King's Salem's Lot is headed to the movies. Ben Affleck will direct and star in the adaptation of Rick Beyer and Elizabeth Sayles's The Ghost Army of World War II: How One Top-Secret Unit Deceived the Enemy with Inflatable Tanks, Sound Effects, and Other Audacious Fakery. Jeff Pearlman’s Showtime: Magic, Kareem, Riley, and the Los Angeles Lakers Dynasty of the 1980s is set for HBO.

Variety writes that the World War Z game, based on the Max Brooks novel and the film adaptation, sold "over a million copies in its first week of release."

The Guardian reports that the Tolkien estate is disavowing the forthcoming biopic.

Melinda Gates, The Moment of Lift: How Empowering Women Changes the World (Flatiron: Macmillan), will be on The Daily Show tonight. Nancy Pearl interviews Gates for her Book Lust program, re-aired from ALA Midwinter.

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