Ernest Gaines Dies, plus More Award News, Nov. 6, 2019 | Book Pulse

Ernest Gaines (The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman) has died. The Andrew Carnegie Medals shortlist is out. The opening round of the Goodreads Choice Awards is open. Not without controversy, Richard Ford is set to receive the Hadada prize. The Belletrist November book club pick is Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me by Adrienne Brodeur. The BBC's “Novels That Shaped Our World” is off and running with a list of 100 books.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Ernest J. Gaines

 

 

 

 

 

Ernest Gaines has died. Entertainment Weekly has an obituary. So does The Washington Post, L.A. Times, and NPR. He was an award-winning author with an award named in his honor; also a beloved book club choice for A Lesson Before Dying (Vintage: Penguin).

Awards

The Andrew Carnegie Medals shortlist is out.

The opening round of the Goodreads Choice Awards is open. Here are the nominees. You have four days if you want to take part.

The shortlist for The Reading Women Award, from Reading Women, is out, via its podcast.

Richard Ford is set to receive the Hadada prize from The Paris Review. Authors Viet Thanh Nguyen, Sarah Weinman, Saeed Jones, and more have questioned the honor, given that Ford once spit in the face of Colson Whitehead. The Guardian has a report.

Reviews

NPR reviews Little Weirds by Jenny Slate (Little, Brown: Hachette): "I wish that Little Weirds were weirder, and more intimate.” Also, In the Dream House: A Memoir by Carmen Maria Machado (Graywolf Press: Macmillan): “the most innovative memoir I've ever read.”

NYT reviews Essays One: Reading and Writing by Lydia Davis (FSG: Macmillan): “She is our Vermeer, patiently observing and chronicling daily life but from angles odd and askew.” Also, They Will Drown in Their Mothers' Tears by Johannes Anyuru, translated by Saskia Vogel (Two Lines Press): “has a powerful emotional core.” The Vanderbeekers to the Rescue by Karina Yan Glaser (HMH Books for Young Readers): “while the happy ending might be a foregone conclusion, there is great satisfaction in seeing how their favorite characters untangle the knot this time.” The Children’s column is out, focused on funny books. The Shortlist gathers “New Israeli Fiction.”

The Washington Post reviews In the Dream House: A Memoir by Carmen Maria Machado (Graywolf Press: Macmillan): “a page turner of psychological suspense.”

Briefly Noted

The Belletrist November book club pick is Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me by Adrienne Brodeur (HMH; LJ starred review).

Bustle picks the “Best New Romance Novels You Can Read Right Now.”

The NYPL picks “9 Books for Native American Heritage Month.”

Entertainment Weekly explores “How Carmen Maria Machado wrote the best memoir of the year.”

Shondaland spotlights Margaret Wilkerson Sexton, The Revisioners (Counterpoint).

Jezebel highlights Homesick by Jennifer Croft (Unnamed Press).

People showcases Grit & Grace: Train the Mind, Train the Body, Own Your Life by Tim McGraw (Harper Wave).

The NYT features The Last Course: A Cookbook by Claudia Fleming with Melissa Clark (Random House).

io9 writes about Game of Thrones: A Guide to Westeros and Beyond: The Complete Series by Myles McNutt (Chronicle).

Paste writes about Ordinary Girls: A Memoir by Jaquira Díaz (Algonquin: Workman; LJ starred review).

The Atlantic features A Double Life by Barbara Heldt, translated by Daniel Green, Karolina Pavlova (Columbia Univ).

Entertainment Weekly excerpts The Relentless Moon: A Lady Astronaut Novel by Mary Robinette Kowal (Tor Books: Macmillan). Also, an excerpt of The Boy from the Woods by Harlan Coben (Grand Central: Hachette).

Bustle interviews Erin MorgensternThe Starless Sea (Doubleday: Random House; LJ starred review) Also, Lindy WestThe Witches Are Coming (Hachette): Esquire interviews West too.

The NYT has an image-filled interview with Jim Kay, the artist behind the Harry Potter illustrated editions.

Vulture interviews Jenny Slate, Little Weirds (Little, Brown: Hachette). Elle does as well.

Time interviews William Dalrymple, The Anarchy: The East India Company, Corporate Violence, and the Pillage of an Empire (Bloomsbury: Macmillan).

The NYT interviews Édouard Louis, as two of his books are adapted into plays.

In forthcoming book news, Entertainment Weekly highlights Resistance: A Songwriter’s Story of Hope, Change, and Courage by Tori Amos (Atria: S. & S.). Women’s Prize–longlisted writer Jemma Wayne has a new book coming in 2020, To Dare while award-winning historical fiction author Hazel Gaynor plans The Kingfisher Patrol for 2020. The Bookseller has details on both. James Andrew Miller is working on a book about HBO, Recode reports.

Publishers Weekly has more on the Justice Department letter about A Warning by Anonymous, reporting that Hachette “respectfully declines” to comply and is moving ahead with publication

The NYT reports on the sale slump for tickets to Cursed Child on Broadway.

Authors on Air

The BBC show about the “Novels That Shaped Our World” is off and running. Here is their list of the 100 novels. The Guardian also has a report.

NPR’s Fresh Air interviews David Owen, Volume Control: Hearing in a Deafening World (Riverhead: Penguin; LJ starred review).

NPR’s Morning Edition interviews Ringo Starr, Another Day In The Life (Genesis Publications) as well as Mo Rocca, Mobituaries: Great Lives Worth Reliving (S. & S.).

Tor.com has a guide to the characters of The Witcher.

Refinery29 has a guide to the daemons in His Dark Materials.

PBS NewsHour interviews Edward Norton, star and director of Motherless Brooklyn.

Nancy Pearl interviews Juliet Grames, The Seven or Eight Deaths of Stella Fortuna (Ecco: Harper) on her Book Lust show.

The Today show features Finding Chika: A Little Girl, an Earthquake, and the Making of a Family by Mitch Albom (Harper), The Great Pretender: The Undercover Mission That Changed Our Understanding of Madness by Susannah Cahalan (Grand Central: Hachette; LJ starred review), Little Weirds by Jenny Slate (Little, Brown: Hachette), and Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two: The Official Playscript of the Original West End Production by J.K. Rowling, Jack Thorne, John Tiffany (Arthur A. Levine Books: Scholastic).

Deadline reports that His Dark Materials is getting blockbuster viewership. There is more casting news for The Batman film: Colin Farrell to play Penguin and Andy Serkis perhaps as Alfred Pennyworth. Jennifer Mathieu’s Moxie is headed to Netflix. Rules for Vanishing by Kate Alice Marshall sells screen rights.

The Hollywood Reporter writes that the showrunner of Dune: The Sisterhood TV show is moving over to work on the sequel to the feature film adaptation of Dune itself.

A Christmas Carol gets its first trailer. This is the one created by Steven Knight (Peaky Blinders) that stars Guy Pearce as Scrooge and Andy Serkis as the Ghost of Christmas Past.

Jenny Slate, Little Weirds (Little, Brown: Hachette) will be on with Seth Meyers tonight. Julian Castro, An Unlikely Journey: Waking Up from My American Dream (Little, Brown: Hachette), will be on The Daily Show. Tulsi Gabbard, Is Today the Day?: Not Another Political Memoir (Twelve: Hachette) will be on The View.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Be the first reader to comment.

Comment Policy:
  • Be respectful, and do not attack the author, people mentioned in the article, or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  • Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  • Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.
  • Comments may be republished in print, online, or other forms of media.
  • If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.


RELATED 

TOP STORIES

LIBRARY EDUCATION

Kids are using VR to explore worlds and create new ones

COMMUNITY FORM

Kids are using VR to explore worlds and create new ones

COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT

Kids are using VR to explore worlds and create new ones

Get connected. Join our global community of more than 200,000 librarians and educators.