Edelweiss Kicks Off Bookfest | Book Pulse

The Edelweiss Bookfest kicks off two days of programming today. The Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing finalists are announced. The 2021 Sunday Times Audible Short Story Award Shortlist is announced. ¡Hola Papi!: How to Come Out in a Walmart Parking Lot and Other Life Lessons by John Paul Brammer gets attention. The Profession: A Memoir of Community, Race, and the Arc of Policing in America by Bill Bratton and Peter Knobler gets reviewed. Michelle Zauner’s Crying in H Mart will get a movie adaptation. Plus, Zadie Smith’s mother, Yvonne Bailey-Smith, has a debut novel, The Day I Fell Off My Island which will be published in the US in October.

 

 

 

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Events & Awards

The Edelweiss Bookfest begins today with programming, including a librarian track. Keynote speakers include Tayari Jones, Anthony Doerr, Natasha Tarpley and more. 

The 2021 Sunday Times Audible Short Story Award Shortlist is announced. 

The Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing finalists are announced.  

Reviews

The NYT reviews The Plague Year: America in the Time of Covid by Lawrence Wright (Knopf; LJ starred review): “Wright uses an expert guide to walk us through these events in real time, a strategy that works brilliantly.” Also, Dear Senthuran: A Black Spirit Memoir by Akwaeke Emezi (Riverhead): “The book is structured as a series of letters from the author to their friends, lovers, other writers, divine and human family. In them Emezi recounts episodes in their life, from their gender confirmation surgeries to purchasing a home (a place they call their 'godhouse'), to betrayal at the hands of literary mentors.”  Barcelona Dreaming by Rupert Thomson (Other Press): “It feels unlikely that this novel will prove Thomson’s breakout success — it is perhaps too elusive, too darkling for that — but ‘Barcelona Dreaming’ is a wonderful book, a phantasmal hymn to a city and a lost way of life.” Where You Are Is Not Who You Are: A Memoir by Ursula Burns (Amistad): “If this book is not appreciably better-written than most business stories — it’s not a literary memoir — it nonetheless really reverberates. Burns has a new and important story to tell.” Transmutation: Stories by Alex DiFrancesco (Seven Stories Press): “eclectic, absorbing first collection, ‘Transmutation,'captures moments of in-betweenness (often fraught, sometimes magical) that may be especially familiar to transgender people who are not legible, temporarily or purposefully, to others or themselves.” Helgoland by Carlo Rovelli (Riverhead): “is poetic and spare. Readers unfamiliar with quantum physics may struggle to get its full import.” ¡Hola Papi!: How to Come Out in a Walmart Parking Lot and Other Life Lessons by John Paul Brammer (S. & S.): “a master class of tone and tenderness, as Brammer balances self-compassion with humor.” And, The Profession: A Memoir of Community, Race, and the Arc of Policing in America by Bill Bratton and Peter Knobler (Penguin Pr; LJ starred review): “Bratton’s balanced approach, his crime prevention initiatives, his willingness to listen to both sides in the most incendiary disputes promise to be part of law enforcement in American communities for a long time to come.” Unwell Women: Misdiagnosis and Myth in a Man-Made World by Elinor Cleghorn (Dutton): “Cleghorn is unsparing in her examples of women suffering unimaginable and unnecessary horror at the hands of doctors who were unwilling either to listen closely or to admit when they were stumped.” Lastly, Life on the Line: Young Doctors Come of Age in a Pandemic by Emma Goldberg (Harper): “a valuable chronicle of what interns and residents went through fighting the pandemic this past year.”

The Washington Post reviews Elizabeth and Monty: The Untold Story of Their Intimate Friendship by Charles Casillo (Kensington): “Casillo makes a persuasive case that Taylor’s gutsy, unapologetic AIDS activism, dating back to the earliest years of the epidemic, was inspired by Clift’s memory”

Briefly Noted

USA Today talks with John Paul Brammer, ¡Hola Papi!: How to Come Out in a Walmart Parking Lot and Other Life Lessons (S. & S.) about transforming advice column into memoir form. Vogue also interviews Brammer, the “Chicano Carrie Bradshaw.”

Salon interviews James Patterson about working with Bill Clinton on The President’s Daughter (Little, Brown & Knopf).

The LA Times has an interview with Bill Bratton on The Profession: A Memoir of Community, Race, and the Arc of Policing in America (Penguin Pr; LJ starred review), L.A. Police, and George Floyd.

Bustle has an interview with Sunny Hostin, Summer on the Bluffs (William Morrow: Harper Collins), about her debut novel and the past year.

The San Fransisco Chronicle has an interview with Yang Huang, My Good Son (Univ. of New Orleans Press), about relationships and post-Tiananmen China.

Zadie Smith’s mother Yvonne Bailey-Smith has written a novel, The Day I Fell Off My Island (Myriad Editions) that will be published in the US in October. LitHub has the story.

Bitch has a piece on The Afrominimalist's Guide to Living with Less by Christine Platt (Tiller Press), and how “Afrominimalism offers a new vision for Black people.”

USA Today looks at The Collected Works of Jim Morrison: Poetry, Journals, Transcripts, and Lyrics by Jim Morrison (Harper Design) and shows a peek at rare handwritten poem.

The Atlantic’s “Books Briefing” looks at “stories on visibility, self-understanding, and the development of queerness as an identity.”

Tordotcom has “All the New Fantasy Books Arriving in June!”

Entertainment Weekly has “The best comics to read in June.”

T&C has “The Must-Read Books of Summer 2021.”

Popsugar has “the 47 Best Summer Reads of 2021.”

Elin Hilderbrand responds to accusations of “casual anti-Semitism” in Golden Girl, after it was reported in Publishers WeeklyLitHub has the story.

“Twitter suspends Naomi Wolf after tweeting anti-vaccine misinformation,” reports BBC News.

Authors on Air

NPR’s Morning Edition talks to by Akwaeke Emezi, Dear Senthuran: A Black Spirit Memoir (Riverhead) about their book suggestions for Pride Month.

NPR’s It’s Been a Minute with Sam Sanders talks with Zakiya Dalila Harris about her novel The Other Black Girl (Atria; LJ starred review), office politics, and publishing.

The Atlantic has “The Only Movie Watchlist You’ll Need This Summer,” including several adaptations.

Writer-director Natasha Kermani will adapt and direct Joe Hill’s short story "Abraham’s Boys" for the big screen, Deadline reports.

Michelle Zauner’s Crying in H Mart (Knopf) will get movie adaptation, reports Vulture. Zauner will provide the soundtrack while Stacey Sher and Jason Kim will produce.

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