"Deadlock" by Catherine Coulter Leads The New Bestsllers | Book Pulse

Deadlock by Catherine Coulter leads five new books onto the bestseller lists. Luster by Raven Leilani continues to get focused attention. A number of outlets mark the anniversary of Toni Morrison's death. Trump books are in the news.

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New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

Deadlock by Catherine Coulter (Gallery Books: S. & S.) debuts at No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list and No. 8 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

1st Case by James Patterson, Chris Tebbetts (Little, Brown: Hachette) opens at No. 3 on both the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The End of Her by Shari Lapena (Pamela Dorman Books: Penguin) takes No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Nonfiction

The Plus: Self-Help for People Who Hate Self-Help by Greg Gutfeld (Threshold Editions: S. & S.) holds No. 9 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Memorial Drive: A Daughter's Memoir by Natasha Trethewey (Ecco: Harper; LJ starred review) tells its story at No. 14 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Antiracist Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

How To Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (One World: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 11 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon): No. 2 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 6 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo (Seal: Hachette; LJ starred review): No. 3 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 4 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Walking with the Wind: A Memoir of the Movement (S. & S.): No. 5 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): No. 8 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi (Nation): No. 9 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah (One World: Random House): No. 10 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 11 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (New Press): No. 13 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Across That Bridge: A Vision for Change and the Future of America (Hachette): No. 14 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The NYT reviews Luster by Raven Leilani (FSG: Macmillan): “reads like summer: sentences like ice that crackle or melt into a languorous drip; plot suddenly, wildly flying forward like a bike down a hill.” Also, True Crimes and Misdemeanors: The Investigation of Donald Trump by Jeffrey Toobin, (Doubleday: Random House): “Toobin’s absorbing, fast-paced narrative is anchored by detailed scenes of chaos inside the Trump administration and meetings between Trump’s and Mueller’s lawyers. But it provides no hard information about how and why Mueller came to make his most significant and ill-fated decisions.” Inventory: A Memoir by Darran Anderson (FSG: Macmillan): “His uncluttered, graceful prose transmits the tactile experience of his childhood while grounding it in historical context, in a way that makes the details of one’s existence seem at once specific and pointless.” The Lost Pianos of Siberia by Sophy Roberts (Grove): “Roberts’s descriptions of landscapes are as lovely as fine embroidery, but when she searches for words to describe music she comes up empty.” The Nazi Menace: Hitler, Churchill, Roosevelt, Stalin, and the Road to War by Benjamin Carter Hett (Holt: Macmillan): “fast-moving, absorbing and aptly titled.” Life Events by Karolina Waclawiak (FSG: Macmillan): “astute and distressing.” The “Shortlist” considers “The Many Varieties of Donald Trump.”

NPR reviews Harrow the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir (Tor.com: Macmillan; LJ starred review): “there's just something so gorgeously Baroque about it all. So beautifully, wildly and precariously weird that I couldn't help sliding through page after page, rolling around blood-drunk in the mess of it all, and waiting, waiting, WAITING to see how Muir would bring it all home. I hated some of the answers I got. I cheered others. And none of it was clean or easy and none of it — none of it — was what I was expecting.”

Tor.com reviews Lobizona by Romina Garber (Wednesday Books: Macmillan): “Wild yet contemplative and outlandish yet rooted in reality, it offered almost everything I wanted in a YA fantasy series opener. A year is too long to wait for the sequel. The anticipation is too much!”

Lit Hub picks “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

It has been a year since Toni Morrison’s death. NPR marks the moment and USA Today has a pictorial remembrance. Electric Lit also has a feature.

The Atlantic has the story “Is This the Beginning of the End of American Racism?” by Ibram X. Kendi, How To Be an Antiracist (One World: Random House; LJ starred review).

The September Indie Next list is out. Anxious People by Fredrik Backman (Atria: S. & S.; LJ starred review) tops the list.

In forthcoming book news, Fiona Hill has a book on the way, There Is Nothing for You Here: Opportunity in an Age of Decline (HMH). It is due out in fall 2021. USA Today has a report.

Tor.com writes about Red Tigress by Amélie Wen Zhao (Delacorte Press: Random House), coming in March.

The NYT considers Donald Trump Jr.'s self-publishing efforts. His book is Liberal Privilege: Joe Biden and the Democrats’ Defense of the Indefensible.

Elle features Raven Leilani, Luster (FSG: Macmillan) in a piece titled “Raven Leilani Is Your New Favorite Novelist.”

The Millions has a short piece on Gayl Jones, Eva's Man (Beacon Press: Random House).

The NYT is running a series of feature pieces about WWII. This includes a piece by the author Yoko Ogawa who reflects “on the literature unleashed by the atomic bombings.” Also, a piece of the photographs of the war taken in the wake of those bombings. Narratively has a feature as well.

The Washington Post has “Alan Dershowitz claims a fictional lawyer defamed him. The implications for novelists are very real.”

Publishers Weekly celebrates “100 Years of Agatha Christie Novels.”

The Takeout celebrates The Moosewood Cookbook by Mollie Katzen (Ten Speed Press: Random House).

Barbara Hoffert has new “Prepub Alert” updates in LJ.

The Washington Post features “Locked-room masterpieces from Japan.”

Electric Lit offers “7 Books About Coming of Age in a Small Town.”

The Strategist has “The Best Instant Pot Cookbooks, According to Instant Pot Cookbook Authors.”

Tor.com excerpts Star Daughter by Shveta Thakrar (Harper Teen).

Tor.com runs S.L. Huang’s Hugo-Winning Story “As the Last I May Know.”

The NYT runs the poem "i want to speak of unity" by Juan Felipe Herrera, as selected by Naomi Shihab Nye.

The NYT features Chanel Miller, Know My Name: A Memoir (Viking: Penguin; LJ starred review).

The L. A. Times writes about Sara Faith Alterman, Let's Never Talk About This Again: A Memoir (Grand Central: Hachette).

The Guardian interviews Brandon Taylor and C Pam Zhang, their books are Real Life (Riverhead: Penguin) and How Much of These Hills Is Gold (Riverhead: Penguin; LJ starred review).

Fiona Davis, The Lions of Fifth Avenue (Dutton: Penguin), answers Entertainment Weekly’s “What’s In A Page” set of questions.

Eddie S. Glaude Jr., Begin Again: James Baldwin's America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own (Crown: Random House), features in the NYT "Inside the List" column.

The Huntington Library is creating a new Octavia E. Butler Fellowship. Locus reports.

Pete Hamill had died. Variety has an obituary.

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Shirley Ann Grau has died. USA Today has an obituary.

Kathleen Duey has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Author, playwright, and critic Eric Bentley has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Authors on Air

NPR’s Fresh Air interviews Jeffrey Toobin, True Crimes and Misdemeanors: The Investigation of Donald Trump (Doubleday: Random House).

NPR’s Pop Culture Happy Hour considers Star Trek: Lower Decks.

Town & Country reports on season seven of Endeavour, which starts on Aug. 9 and is based on the characters created by Colin Dexter.

Tor.com has an update on the forthcoming Dune film.

Deadline reports that Nia DaCosta (Candyman) will direct Marvel’s sequel to Captain Marvel. Also, High Fidelity is cancelled by Hulu after its debut season. New Kid by Jerry Craft is headed to the movies. LeBron James’s SpringHill Entertainment will develop and produce. Regina Hall joins the cast of Nine Perfect Strangers. Candice Fox’s Crimson Lake is getting adapted as the crime drama Troppo.

Tom Hanks might play Geppetto in Disney’s Pinocchio. Variety reports.

Amazon gathers “Upcoming book-to-film adaptations.”

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