NBCC Awards Event Cancelled; Stephen King Sounds Off—Again | Book Pulse

The National Book Critics Circle cancels its awards ceremony and finalists readings due to the coronavirus. The awards will still be announced this week. The longlist for the Walter Scott Prize is out. Stephen King is not happy with The Stand getting tied to the coronavirus. Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi, Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You, will be on the Daily Show tonight. Pete Buttigieg will guest host Jimmy Kimmel Live on Thursday.

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Awards

The National Book Critics Circle cancels its awards ceremony and finalists readings, which were to be held later this week, due to the coronavirus. The gala will be held in the fall instead. Winners will still be announced this week.

The longlist for the Walter Scott Prize is announced.

The Lambda Literary Awards announce their finalists for the Lammys.

The Carl Brandon Society reinstitutes the Carl Brandon Parallax and Kindred Awards. Tor.com has background.

Reviews

The L.A. Times reviews Temporary by Hilary Leichter (Coffee House Press): “weird, dreamy.”

USA Today reviews The Mirror & The Light by Hilary Mantel (Henry Holt: Macmillan), giving it 4 stars and writing “every page is rich with insight, the soul-deep characterization and cutting observational skill that make Mantel’s trilogy such a singular accomplishment.” Also, Most Likely by Sarah Watson (Poppy: Hachette), giving it 3 stars and calling it “sweet and empowering.”

The NYT reviews Child of Light: A Biography of Robert Stone by Madison Smartt Bell (Doubleday): “This is one of those rare biographies in which you don’t feel like skimming the first 35 pages.” Also, Spirit Run: A 6,000-Mile Marathon Through North America’s Stolen Land by Noé Álvarez (Catapult): “lyrical if uneven.” Kiley Reid reviews A Good Neighborhood by Therese Anne Fowler (St. Martin’s: Macmillan; LJ starred review): “In the same way that activism cannot be sold for $26, black characters cannot be bought when they lack depth and accessibility.” New Waves by Kevin Nguyen (One World: Random House): “Though it doesn’t quite stick the landing, [it] cleverly conjures a modern Gatsby-and-Nick-Carraway dynamic between the narrator, Lucas, and his co-worker Margo.” Our Revolution: A Mother and Daughter at Midcentury by Honor Moore (W.W. Norton): “searching … ruminative, sometimes lyrical.” In Pursuit of Disobedient Women: A Memoir of Love, Rebellion, and Family, Far Away by Dionne Searcey (Ballantine: Random House): “Quietly listening, Searcey takes down the details of their everyday experience.” You Will Never Be Forgotten: Stories by Mary South (FSG: Macmillan): “her stories could not feel timelier.” At the Center of All Beauty: Solitude and the Creative Life by Fenton Johnson (W.W. Norton): “lyrical yet finely argued.” In Our Prime: How Older Women Are Reinventing the Road Ahead by Susan J. Douglas (W.W. Norton): “a clarion call for older women to ‘rip off the invisibility cloak’ and reinvent the world they live in so it stops cheating them.” The Gringa by Andrew Altschul (Melville House: Random House): “he is most insightful when dissecting the romantic allure, for a certain kind of left-leaning Westerner, of a third world country whose social reality seems more black and white, the solutions simpler.” The Firsts: The Inside Story of the Women Reshaping Congress by Jennifer Steinhauer (Algonquin): “She conveys throughout admiration, sympathy and compassion for her subjects while they learn the hard way that hidebound traditions, a rigid seniority system and encrusted modes of governance do not yield readily to even the strongest convictions.” The Shortlist looks at story collections that explore “the Spectrum of Human Honesty.”

The Washington Post reviews My Dark Vanessa by Kate Elizabeth Russell (William Morrow: Harper; LJ starred review): “It’s a lightning rod. A brilliantly crafted novel.” Also, Separation Anxiety by Laura Zigman (Ecco: Harper): “The light from Laura Zigman’s new novel … is generated by a kind of literary nuclear fusion: an intense compression of grief and humor. The combination of those elements usually produces cynical black comedy, something witty and bitter, but Zigman’s work is too tender for that.” Deacon King Kong by James McBride (Riverhead: Penguin; LJ starred review): “a hilarious, pitch-perfect comedy … may qualify it as one of the year’s best novels … has constructed a story with a deeper meaning for those who choose to read beyond the plot, one that makes the work funnier, sweeter and more profound.”

Jasmine Guillory reviews It’s Not All Downhill from Here by Terry McMillan (Ballantine: Random House) for O: The Oprah Magazine: “a wise and wisecracking novel of aging, heartbreak, and the quest to “pump up the volume” in late midlife.” Also,  Joyce Carol Oates reviews The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich (Harper; LJ starred review): “a singular achievement even for this accomplished writer.” Ivy Pochoda reviews The Glass Hotel by Emily St. John Mandel (Knopf: Random House; LJ starred review): “an icy-smooth tale crafted in crystalline prose.” Hamilton Cain reviews The Mirror & The Light by Hilary Mantel (Henry Holt: Macmillan): “Mantel brings her signal achievement home with a dance between scepter and scaffold.”

Briefly Noted

Stephen King is not happy with The Stand getting tied to the coronavirus. USA Today reports.

Bustle has a list of “15 Novels About Viral Outbreaks To Make You Feel Less Alone.”

The Guardian suggests reading a romance novel if you need cheering up and has a list to try.

Tor.com has “5 SFF Books Written by Afro-Caribbean Authors.”

Electric Lit offers “8 Contemporary Novels by Japanese Women Writers.”

Refinery29 gathers “8 Books That Celebrate Complicated Women.”

The Atlantic has an essay by Alexandra Styron: “Reflections on my father’s novels The Confessions of Nat Turner and Sophie’s Choice, in the age of American Dirt.”

In forthcoming book news, Lady Gaga has a book, Channel Kindness: Stories of Kindness and Community (Feiwel & Friends: Macmillan), coming out on Sept. 22, 2020. O: The Oprah Magazine has details. Also, Modern Comfort Food by Ina Garten (Clarkson Potter) will arrive on Oct. 27. People has a story. Mariko Tamaki (This One Summer, Skim, Laura Dean Keeps Breaking Up With Me) is taking over the Wonder Woman comic starting this summer. The Hollywood Reporter has details. Vogue writes about June Canedo’s Mara Kuya (Small Editions).

The Atlantic considers “The Claustrophobic Menace of Boarding-School Fiction.”

Bitch Media showcases Disfigured: On fairytales, Disability, and Making Space by Amanda Leduc (Coach House Books; LJ starred reivew).

NPR excerpts The City We Became by N.K. Jemisin (Orbit: Hachette).

Entertainment Weekly excerpts Barry Sonnenfeld, Call Your Mother: Memoirs of a Neurotic Filmmaker (Hachette).

LitHub interviews Jason Reynolds, the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature and coauthor with Ibram X. Kendi of Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You: A Remix of the National Book Award-winning Stamped from the Beginning (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers: Hachette; SLJ starred review). Also, an interview with Paul Lisicky, Kevin Nguyen, Katy Simpson Smith, Jessi Jezewska Stevens, and Julian Tepper.

Entertainment Weekly interviews comic creators Geoff Johns and Jason Fabok.

Time interviews Louise Erdrich, The Night Watchman (Harper; LJ starred review).

LitHub offers “5 Books You May Have Missed in February.” Also, a piece on how the editor Judith Jones changed American food writing.

Refinery29 writes “These Powerful Women Are Changing The Literary Landscape.”

Wood Allen’s memoir may get published in France writes The Guardian. The publisher there says that Allen is “not Roman Polanski … the American situation is not ours.” It will be up to Allen to allow publication since all rights were retuned to him upon the Hachette decision to cancel last week. In related news PEN America has issued a statement about the cancellation.

The Guardian writes about the mobile library serving refugees in Greece. Also, in the paper, a story about the stolen 14th-century manuscript by the Persian poet Hafez, which has been recovered and is now set for auction.

Mystery writer Barbara Neely, creator of the Blanche White series who, as USA Today writes was the “first black female series sleuth in mainstream American publishing,” has died. The paper has coverage.

Authors on Air

NPR’s Fresh Air interviews James McBride, Deacon King Kong (Riverhead: Penguin; LJ starred review).

The Washington Post writes about “the joys – and challenges – of adapting Stephen King.”

Deadline writes that Lost in Space will get a third, but final, season with Netflix. Netflix also makes news with cast reveals for its adaptation of the Dash & Lily books by Rachel Cohn and David Levithan. Under Another Name by Alexandra Andrews heads to the movies. Author and former candidate Pete Buttigieg will guest host Jimmy Kimmel Live on Thursday.

The Today show features The Gift of Forgiveness: Inspiring Stories from Those Who Have Overcome the Unforgivable by Katherine Schwarzenegger (Pamela Dorman Books: Penguin) as well as Paying It Backward: How a Childhood of Poverty and Abuse Fueled a Life of Gratitude and Philanthropy by Tony March, Marvin Karlins (Forefront Books: S. & S.).

Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi, Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You: A Remix of the National Book Award-winning Stamped from the Beginning (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers: Hachette; SLJ starred review) will be on the Daily Show tonight.

The Undoing gets a trailer. It is based on Jean Hanff Korelitz’s You Should Have Known and will debut on May 10.

Black Widow gets a trailer. It opens on May 1 and is based on the Marvel comics character.

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