Awards for Comics, Speculative Fiction, & Western-Set Books, Apr. 17, 2019 | Book Pulse

More award news breaks today, helping readers of comics and genre readers, as well as those who are drawn to landscape. Ann Petry gets attention in the NYT and Morgan Jerkins interviews Claudia Rankine for Vulture. State of the Union: A Marriage in Ten Parts by Nick Hornby will publish in May. It is the source for the Sundance TV show of the same name.

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Awards

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Cartoonists Studio Prize winners have been announced. Chlorine Gardens by Keiler Roberts (Koyama Press; LJ starred review) wins for Best Print Comic.

The Kitschies winners are announced. Circe by Madeline Miller (Little, Brown: Hachette) takes one of the prizes. The shortlist is here.

Reading The West announces its 2019 Book Award winners. Where the Dead Sit Talking by Brandon Hobson (Soho: Random House) wins for Fiction.

The NYT considers reading the finalist for the Pulitzers. The Atlantic has a story on the Fiction winner, Richard Powers.

Reviews

The NYT reviews Ann Petry: The Street, The Narrows by Ann Petry (Library of America: Penguin): "Petry will always feel on time. Her kind of talent will always feel startling and sui generis: The music of her sentences, and their discipline; her unerring sense of psychology; the fullness with which she endows each character, which must be understood as a kind of love; the plots that commandeer whole hours and days ... Her work endures not only because it illuminates reality, but because it harnesses the power of fiction to supplant it." Also, Minutes of Glory: And Other Stories by Ngugi wa Thiong'o (The New Press): "Seldom have the raw truths of Africa been exposed so vividly, yet humorously, as in this collection."

NPR reviews Southern Lady Code: Essays by Helen Ellis (Doubleday: Random House; LJ starred review): "prepare yourself for some off-the-wall hilarity." Also, White by Bret Easton Ellis (Knopf): "aggrieved ... Most of us carry around an invisible rosary of resentments to fiddle with in petty moments; most of us also know to keep these grudges private. So there is a kind of magnificent solipsism involved in printing them in a book and insisting they explain the decline of American culture."

USA Today reviews Normal People by Sally Rooney (Hogarth: Random House; LJ starred review), giving it 3.5 stars and calling it "bracingly assured."

The Washington Post reviews Normal People by Sally Rooney (Hogarth: Random House; LJ starred review): "as absorbing as the buzz would lead you to believe." The review also includes the news that Rooney is adapting the story for a TV series. Also, Miracle Creek by Angie Kim (Sarah Crichton: Macmillan; LJ starred review): "readers will be riveted by the book’s genre-bending structure and superb pace ... Miracle Creek is a stunning debut." Ungovernable: The Victorian Parent's Guide to Raising Flawless Children by Therese Oneill (Little, Brown: Hachette): "serves as a reminder that pseudoscience is hardly a relic of the past."

Entertainment Weekly reviews The Mister by E L James (Vintage: Random House), giving it an F and calling it "unoriginal and dull from the syntax up ... truly fails."

Briefly Noted

CrimeReads picks "April's Best Debut Thrillers and Crime Novels."

The NYT features Kwame Onwuachi, Notes from a Young Black Chef: A Memoir (Knopf).

Entertainment Weekly interviews Heather Morris, Cilka's Journey (St. Martin's: Macmillan).

Morgan Jerkins interviews Claudia Rankine for Vulture.

Vogue interviews Bret Easton Ellis.

O Magazine has a short interview with Jacqueline Woodson about her forthcoming novel, Red at the Bone (Riverhead: Penguin).

Becky Albertalli (Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda) and Aisha Saeed (Amal Unbound) joined forces to write a new novel, Yes No Maybe So, forthcoming next year. Entertainment Weekly has early details.

Carly Simon is writing a memoir about Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Touched by the Sun: My Friendship with Jackie (FSG: Macmillan). USA Today has the story.

Time excerpts Cities: The First 6,000 Years by Monica L. Smith (Viking: Penguin).

Jezebel reports that a mourning ring filled with Charlotte Brontë's hair has been discovered.

Poet Stanley Plumly has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Warren Adler has died. Monkey Punch has died. Deadline Hollywood has obituaries for both authors.

Authors on Air

NPR interviews Rich Karlgaard, Late Bloomers: The Power of Patience in a World Obsessed with Early Achievement (Currency: Random House).

PBS News Hour interviews David Brooks, The Second Mountain: The Quest for a Moral Life (Random House).

Deadline Hollywood reports that AMC is adapting Sleeping Beauties by Owen and Stephen King. Owen King will write the script. Gillian Flynn is busy these days writing for TV. Her newest project, Utopia, will air on Amazon and star John Cusack. Also for Amazon, The Last Mrs. Parrish by Liv Constantine. There is news on the adaptation of Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood.

State of the Union: A Marriage in Ten Parts by Nick Hornby (Riverhead: Penguin) will publish in May. It is the source for the Sundance TV show of the same name, starring Rosamund Pike and Chris O’Dowd, that begins airing on May 6. There is a trailer.

Stephen Colbert will have Jake Sherman and Anna Palmer, The Hill to Die On: The Battle for Congress and the Future of Trump's America (Crown: Random House), on tonight.

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