Booklists, Book Clubs, and Book Awards, Oct. 2, 2019 | Book Pulse

Reese Witherspoon’s October book club pick is Fair Play: A Game-Changing Solution for When You Have Too Much to Do (and More Life to Live) by Eve Rodsky. The longlists for the Andrew Carnegie Medals are out. Lots of authors, including Jacqueline Woodson, Red at the Bone, will be on the late night talk shows this evening.

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Booklists, Book Clubs, and Book Awards

 

 

 

 

 

 

More picks for October's best reads arrive:

Book Marks (SFF) | Entertainment Weekly | LitHub | The Millions (poetry) | io9 (SFF) | Refinery29 | Time

Also, more seasonal selections:

Tor.com has horror book suggestions based on tolerance levels and films.

Bustle suggests “15 Creepy Scandinavian Novels By Women To Read This Spooky Season.”

In book club news:

Reese Witherspoon’s October book club pick is Fair Play: A Game-Changing Solution for When You Have Too Much to Do (and More Life to Live) by Eve Rodsky (G.P. Putnam’s Sons: Penguin). Time has an essay by Rodsky.

The Wired book of the month is Frankissstein by Jeanette Winterson (Grove Press; LJ starred review).

In book award news:

The longlists for the Andrew Carnegie Medals are out.

The Southern California Independent Booksellers Association announce their annual book awards. The L.A. Times has details.

Reviews

The NYT reviews The Topeka School by Ben Lerner (FSG: Macmillan): “so different in tone, so unabashed in its conventionality — and even geometric in plot — that it can read like a critique of Lerner’s previous work.” Also, Make It Scream, Make It Burn: Essays by Leslie Jamison (Little, Brown: Hachette): “Jamison’s journalistic battle between sentiment and detachment rages on, sometimes resulting in texture, sometimes in tedium.” She Was Like That: New and Selected Stories by Kate Walbert (Scribner: S. & S.): “a fascinatingly integrated story collection … a bracingly pessimistic, even bleak, vision.” There is also an excerpt. Full Throttle: Stories by Joe Hill (William Morrow: Harper): “so good at endings of the unhappy variety ... Also beginnings. Often middles, too, his stories pushing you along with the intangible dread of a fable, pulling you forward with the inexorable logic of a mathematical proof.” “The Shortlist” gathers “Dead Fathers, Feminist Icons and Other Poetic Obsessions.” “The Enthusiast” celebrates Lucille Clifton in a piece by poet Reginald Dwayne Betts, Felon: Poems (W.W. Norton).

Entertainment Weekly reviews The Topeka School by Ben Lerner (FSG: Macmillan) as well, giving it a B and writing "there is the sense that Lerner is straining to scale up the impact of this novel, to make explicit the thread that weaves his disparate threads into an explosive, politically relevant, male-dominated whole."

The Washington Post reviews Imaginary Friend by Stephen Chbosky (Grand Central: Hachette): “a page-turning meditation on human suffering whose spiritual dimension does not become fully apparent until the entire story has been told … an absorbing, original and genuinely surprising novel.”

NPR reviews Here We Are: American Dreams, American Nightmares by Aarti Namdev Shahani (Celadon: Macmillan; LJ starred review): “riveting.” Also, Things We Didn't Talk About When I Was a Girl: A Memoir by Jeannie Vanasco (Tin House: W.W. Norton): "This meta-commentary about the book itself is all over, making a reader feel like we're going through the process — of writing, of remembering, of approaching a deeply nuanced topic — in real time along with the author."

USA Today reviews Pursuit by Joyce Carol Oates (Mysterious Press), giving it 3 out of 4 stars and writing “short, spare … succeeds on the level of its ambition: creepy, violent and occasionally affecting.”

Briefly Noted

In buzzy book news, Instagram poet and artist Morgan Harper Nichols announces her book, All Along You Were Blooming: Thoughts for Boundless Living (Zondervan: Harper), and it soars in sales. It comes out Jan. 2020.

Entertainment Weekly previews Deacon King Kong by James McBride (Riverhead: Penguin). Also, an excerpt from The Science of Rick and Morty: The Unofficial Guide to Earth's Stupidest Show by Matt Brady (Atria: S. & S.).

Time excerpts Letters from Hollywood: Inside the Private World of Classic American Moviemaking by Rocky Lang, Barbara Hall (Abrams). Also an adapted excerpt of Einstein on the Run: How Britain Saved the World’s Greatest Scientist by Andrew Robinson (Yale).

BuzzFeed excerpts The In-Betweens: The Spiritualists, Mediums, and Legends of Camp Etna by Mira Ptacin (Liveright: W. W. Norton).

Paste excerpts Batman: Nightwalker (The Graphic Novel) by Marie Lu, Stuart Moore, Chris Wildgoose and Wonder Woman: Warbringer (The Graphic Novel) by Leigh Bardugo, Louise Simonson, Kit Seaton (both from DC Ink).

Electric Lit interviews Sanam Maher, A Woman Like Her: The Story Behind the Honor Killing of a Social Media Star (Melville House: Random House).

The Guardian interviews Mary M Talbot and Bryan Talbot, Rain (Dark Horse: Random House).

Nylon interviews Fiona Alison Duncan, Exquisite Mariposa (Soft Skull Press).

Bustle spotlights The Midnight Lie by Marie Rutkoski (FSG: Macmillan). Also, a story on Jeannie Vanasco, Things We Didn't Talk About When I Was a Girl: A Memoir (Tin House: W.W. Norton).

Shondaland features White Bird: A Wonder Story by R. J. Palacio (Knopf Books for Young Readers: Random House). It is getting adapted, see below.

USA Today showcases Metahuman: Unleashing Your Infinite Potential by Deepak Chopra, M.D.(Harmony: Random House).

Haruki Murakami has an essay in The New Yorker. Zadie Smith has a piece in The New York Review of Books.

Boris Pasternak’s great-niece Anna has made a plagiarism claim against The Secrets We Kept by Lara Prescott (Knopf; LJ starred review). The Guardian has details.

Authors on Air

Good Morning America interviews Hillary Rodham Clinton and Chelsea Clinton, The Book of Gutsy Women: Favorite Stories of Courage and Resilience (S. & S.).

NPR’s Fresh Air interviews Jack Goldsmith, In Hoffa's Shadow: A Stepfather, a Disappearance in Detroit, and My Search for the Truth (FSG: Macmillan).

Vulture features podcasts, of all kinds, but including on the influence of true-crime.

PBS NewsHour has discussion questions for We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights by Adam Winkler (Liveright: W.W. Norton; LJ starred review).

Deadline reports that the short story "The Map Of Tiny Perfect Things" by Lev Grossman is headed to the movies. So is Pippi Longstocking, R.J. Palacio’s graphic novel White Bird, and Tom Clancy’s Without Remorse. On Her Own Ground by A’Lelia Bundles is set for TV, under the title Madam C.J. Walker, to star Octavia Spencer and Tiffany Haddish. Ava DuVernay is going to direct an adaptation of the DMZ comic by Brian Wood. Kenneth Branagh’s adaptation of Death On The Nile by Agatha Christie is on the march.

Fox News features Stealth War: How China Took Over While America's Elite Slept by Robert Spalding (Portfolio: Penguin) and Bet on Talent: How to Create a Remarkable Culture That Wins the Hearts of Customers by Dee Ann Turner (Baker Books).

Jacqueline Woodson, Red at the Bone (Riverhead), will be on the Daily Show tonight. Hillary Rodham Clinton and Chelsea Clinton, The Book of Gutsy Women: Favorite Stories of Courage and Resilience (S. & S.), will be on The View. Henry Winkler, Alien Superstar (Book #1) (Amulet Books: Abrams), will be on with Jimmy Fallon tonight. Jonathan Van Ness, Over the Top: A Raw Journey to Self-Love (HarperOne), will be on with James Corden.

Birds of Prey gets a trailer. It is based on the comics characters. The full title of the film is Birds of Prey: And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn.

 

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