Tuesday Must Be Best Books Day, Dec. 11, 2018 | Book Pulse

Call it Best Book Day, as ten more "best of lists" arrive and #LibFaves 2018 swings into gear. NPR picks December romances and The Washington Post picks audio for the season. Godzilla and A Series of Unfortunate Events get trailers.

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Best Books

More best book lists count the notables of the year, just as librarians gear up to name their favorites:

NPR reviewer Maureen Corrigan picks her best books of 2018 and makes The Great Believers by Rebecca Makkai (Viking: Penguin) her book of the year.

PBS names its Best Books of 2018.

USA Today names "10 books we loved reading in 2018."

Paste gathers its "12 Best Novels of 2018."

BookRiot selects the "Best Books of 2018."

Slate offers its "10 Best Books of 2018."

Nylon picks its best, in a list of 12.

The NYT names the Best Poetry of 2018. So does The New Yorker.

Vulture selects the "10 Best Crime Books of 2018."

#LibFaves is underway for 2018. Join in, or just lurk, as librarians name their 10 favorite books of the year, one book at a time.

Reviews

The NYT reviews The Incomplete Book of Running by Peter Sagal (S. & S.): "It’s funny, well written (mostly), filled with humility and perpetually on the scan for moments of stray grace." Also, in a review written by Natalie Diaz, Evolution by Eileen Myles (Grove Press): "energy builds and burns, in the quick pace of the lines, in unexpected shifts and leaps from interior to exterior, from sensuality to observation."

The Washington Post reviews All the Lives We Never Lived by Anuradha Roy (Atria: S. & S.): "The plot is a silhouette in words, an anguished delineation of the shadow cast by a woman’s absence."

NPR reviews The Museum of Modern Love by Heather Rose (Algonquin: Workman): "a real find ... Rose celebrates the transformative power of art with an artful construct of her own."

Briefly Noted

NPR posts is December Romance column.

The NYT suggests books that show why the White House Chief of Staff matters.

The Washington Post picks "Three great audibooks for your holiday drive."

Time picks some Christmas books to read during the holidays.

The NYT features the archive of David Sedaris, which he just sold to Yale.

The StarTribune writes about why we re-read.

Entertainment Weekly excerpts Meet Me in Monaco by Hazel Gaynor, Heather Webb (William Morrow: Harper).

LitHub counts the biggest literary news stories of the year, today they detail #40 - #31.

Authors on Air

Recursion by Blake Crouch (Crown: Random House, June 2019) is headed to Netflix, helmed by Shonda Rhimes. Entertainment Weekly has details.

The NYT offers some reading suggestions for fans of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel.

The Guardian's books podcast features their best books of the year and prose poetry with Claudia Rankine.

Deadline Hollywood reports that a remake of Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego is headed to Netflix with a January premiere date. Gorilla and the Bird: A Memoir of Madness and a Mother's Love by Zack McDermott (Little, Brown: Hachette) is going to HBO. The Strange Fascinations of Noah Hypnotik by David Arnold (Viking Books for Young Readers: Penguin) is set for the movies. Deadline also has the full list of Critics' Choice Award nominations, including several based on books. Finally, a report on Alan Moore's newest project.

NPR interviews Casey Gerald, There Will Be No Miracles Here: A Memoir (Riverhead: Penguin).

A Series Of Unfortunate Events, season 3, gets a trailer. So does Godzilla: King of Monsters.

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