Sales Soar for Black-Owned Bookstores | Book Pulse

Black-owned bookstores cope with the spike in orders, customer demands, and the tragic reason sales are up. The winners of the Bisexual Book Awards are announced, as are the longlists for the Polari Prize and the Polari First Book Prize for LGBTQ+ literature. As part of the changes to Macmillan’s decision team, John Sargent, the CEO, is stepping back from day-to-day responsibilities. George R. R. Martin says that he hopes to have The Winds of Winter finished by next year. The Trump family is trying to stop the publication of Mary Trump’s Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man.

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Antiracist Reading Lists, News, and Collection Development/RA Resources

In the U.S., black-owned bookstores are getting overwhelmed with orders for antiracist books, which keep selling out. The NYT reports that at Semicolon Bookstore in Chicago “people lined up down the block not for a famous speaker or a big event, but to buy books on race and antiracism … The store went from moving 3,000 books a week to 50,000 books a week.” Similar stories are playing out around the country. PBS NewsHour has a report that includes links to bookslists and some historical context. Jezebel does as well, noting the horrible reality behind the demand and quoting Kalima DeSuze, owner of Cafe con Libros bookstore in Brooklyn, “We’re thriving because of black bodies ... I would prefer that he still be alive and I still be struggling."

The NYT interviews Brittney Cooper, Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower (St. Martin's: Macmillan; LJ starred review).

The NYT features “Nine Black Artists and Cultural Leaders on Seeing and Being Seen.”

Library Journal has “Black Voices Matter 2020.”

USA Today reports that “Eight of 10 board members and the executive director have resigned from International Thriller Writers, a professional association which has faced widespread criticism for its responses to the Black Lives Matters protests and an author's allegations she was harassed during a writers conference.”

Reviews

NPR reviews All the Way to the Tigers: A Memoir by Mary Morris (Nan A. Talese: Random House): “Rich and unsparing, Morris' slim memoir is a keeper.”

USA Today reviews The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett (Riverhead: Penguin), giving it 3.5 stars and calling it “deeply compelling.” Also, Death in Her Hands by Ottessa Moshfegh (Penguin), giving it 2.5 stars and calling it “a high-handed psychodrama.”

Entertainment Weekly reviews The Lightness by Emily Temple (William Morrow: Harper) which gets a B+ and the comment “Cool, dark, and pretty as a clear night sky.” Also, Death in Her Hands by Ottessa Moshfegh (Penguin), which gets a B- and the line “an intellectual exercise unworthy of Moshfegh’s prodigious talents.”

The Washington Post also reviews Death in Her Hands by Ottessa Moshfegh (Penguin): “pokes fun at the boilerplate detective novel by using its template to tell a mostly static story.”

Salon reviews The Art of Her Deal: The Untold Story of Melania Trump by Mary Jordan (S. & S.): “beyond all doubt an extraordinary book. It is impeccably reported and written — light, clear, engaging and honest throughout. Those qualities, coupled with Jordan's deep wells of sensitivity and research, counterbalance the biography itself, which is in many ways the opposite: of all that opaque, superficial, evasive and ultimately untrustworthy.”

Briefly Noted

The winners of the Bisexual Book Awards are announced.

The longlists for the Polari Prize and Polari First Book Prize for LGBTQ+ literature have been announced.

CrimeReads names “The Best Books of 2020 (So Far).”

The NYT picks “16 Books to Watch For in July.”

Lit Hub names “13 new books making a splash this week.” And has “AudioFile's Best Audiobooks of June.” Also, “10 Works of Literary Fiction for Runners.”

O: The Oprah Magazine lists “All the LGBTQ Books That Are Changing the Literary Landscape in 2020.” Also, “19 Books About Summer Romance That Will Whisk You Away.”

Tor.com goes “Searching for Body Positivity in Fantasy.”

The Strategist offers “The Best Bartending Guides and Cocktail Books, According to Bartenders.”

As part of the changes to Macmillan’s decision team, John Sargent, the CEO, is stepping back from day-to-day responsibilities. NPR reports.

George R. R. Martin says that he hopes to have The Winds of Winter finished by next year. He also shares some of what he is reading.

The Trump family is trying to stop the publication of Mary Trump’s Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man (S. & S.). Deadline reports.

The Washington Post reports on John Bolton’s book, The Room Where It Happened: A White House Memoir (S. & S.), and their interview with him. He will be on The View today.

Vogue spotlights The Turnaway Study: Ten Years, a Thousand Women, and the Consequences of Having—Or Being Denied—an Abortion by Diana Greene Foster (Scribner: S. & S.).

Vulture features The Great Indoors: The Surprising Science of How Buildings Shape Our Behavior, Health, and Happiness by Emily Anthes (Scientific American / FSG: Macmillan).

The NYT showcases French author Virginie Despentes, Vernon Subutex 2 (FSG Originals: Macmillan).

The L.A. Times interviews Stanley Fish, The First: How to Think About Hate Speech, Campus Speech, Religious Speech, Fake News, Post-Truth, and Donald Trump (Atria/One Signal: S. &. S.).

USA Today interviews Kim Campbell, Gentle on My Mind: In Sickness and in Health with Glen Campbell (Thomas Nelson: Harper).

CrimeReads interviews Ottessa Moshfegh, Death in Her Hands (Penguin).

Juan Vidal, Rap Dad: A Story of Family and the Subculture That Shaped a Generation (Atria: S. & S.), shares his Grub Street Diet.

UK bookstores are doing great after the first week of opening, selling almost four million books. That is more than 30% better than the same week last year. The Guardian reports.

Vox has a report on The Internet Archive, including the “Emergency Library.”

Authors on Air

NPR’s Code Switch features Karla Cornejo Villavicencio The Undocumented Americans: A Homecoming (One World: Random House).

NPR’s Fresh Air interviews Susan Burton, Empty (Random House).

Deadline reports that now The Comey Rule will likely air before the election this November. The Showtime series is based on the book by James Comey. NBC plans an adaptation of Dan Brown’s The Lost Symbol. The Anarchy: The Relentless Rise Of The East India Company by William Dalrymple is headed to the movies.

 A trailer is out for Over The Moon. The Netflix show is based on a Chinese myth. It will debut this fall.

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