New Bestsellers, Jan. 16, 2020 | Book Pulse

Dear Edward by Ann Napolitano leads 10 new books onto the bestseller lists. The National Jewish Book Award winners are announced. The February LibraryReads list is announced. The Game of Thrones prequel, House of the Dragon, will air in 2022. Outlander will get “a slew of spin-offs, sequels and story extensions.” Snowpiercer has a premiere date, May 31. There is a new buzzy Trump book out. ALA hires an Executive Director.

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New Bestsellers

[Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books]

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dear Edward by Ann Napolitano (The Dial Press: Random House) debuts at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 5 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Moral Compass by Danielle Steel (Delacorte: Random House) opens at No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Long Bright River by Liz Moore (Riverhead: Penguin; LJ starred review) takes No. 6 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

The Vanishing by Jayne Ann Krentz (Berkley: Penguin; LJ starred review) is visible at No. 7 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Hunter Killer: A Pike Logan Novel by Brad Taylor claims No. 9 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Treason by Stuart Woods (G.P. Putnam’s Sons: Penguin) holds No. 10 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 6 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The River Murders by James Patterson, James O. Born (Grand Central: Hachette) closes out the USA Today Best-Selling Books list at  No. 13.

Nonfiction

Boys & Sex: Young Men on Hookups, Love, Porn, Consent, and Navigating the New Masculinity by Peggy Orenstein (Harper) debuts at No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Successful Aging: A Neuroscientist Explores the Power and Potential of Our Lives by Daniel J Levitin (Dutton: Penguin) opens at No. 10 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Why We Can't Sleep: Women's New Midlife Crisis by Ada Calhoun (Grove Press; LJ starred review) opens its eyes at No. 13 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The L.A. Times reviews A Long Petal of the Sea by Isabel Allende (Ballantine: Random House): “a page-turning story rich with history and surprising subplots that keep the novel unpredictable to the end, serves as a counterpoint and companion to Allende's first novel. This time, though, she focuses on the lives of the downtrodden but no less heroic figures of war.”

The Washington Post reviews Hitting a Straight Lick with a Crooked Stick: Stories from the Harlem Renaissance by Zora Neale Hurston (Amistad: Harper): “Fans and scholars of Hurston’s work and the uninitiated alike will find many delights in these complex, thoughtful and wickedly funny portraits of black lives and communities.”

NPR has a dual review of Dear Edward by Ann Napolitano (The Dial Press: Random House) and Kingdomtide by Rye Curtis (Little, Brown: Hachette): “Both novels are about the aftermath of trauma and how survival against the odds profoundly changes these characters' lives and attitudes. Both protagonists prevail thanks to support from unexpected sources, and in both books, kindness helps steer heartbreaking tales in heartwarming directions. Of the two, Dear Edward is more moving, but Kingdomtide, although less even, is more riveting and surprising.” Also, A Very Stable Genius: Donald J. Trump's Testing of America by Philip Rucker, Carol Leonnig (Penguin): "walks readers step by step through the first 30 months or so of a presidency like no other. They leave little doubt that they and many of their sources regard that presidency as an unmitigated and deepening disaster — a threat to American government as we.”

Book Marks suggests five reviews to read for the week.

Briefly Noted

The National Jewish Book Award winners are announced.

The February LibraryReads list is announced.

O: The Oprah Magazine suggest 16 books to read in January.

Popsugar gathers “25 Western Books Everyone Needs to Read.”

Paste selects “100 of the Best Horror Comics of All Time.” Also, the best audiobooks for January.

Barbara Hoffert considers SFF in LJ's Prepub Alert and issues more of her top picks for the month of July.

The Washington Post gathers books about happiness, not American style.

Tor.com excerpts Stormsong by C. L. Polk (Tor.com: Macmillan).

Datebook features The Art of War: A New Translation by Michael Nylan by Sun Tzu, translated by Michael Nylan (W.W. Norton).

The Washington Post features a book by a pair of their reporters, A Very Stable Genius: Donald J. Trump's Testing of America by Philip Rucker, Carol Leonnig (Penguin), quoting “One government aide tells the authors that Trump has destroyed the gravity and allure that used to surround the presidency, regardless of the Oval Office occupant. ‘He’s ruined that magic,’ this aide said of Trump …The disdain he shows for our country’s foundation and its principles. The disregard he has for right and wrong. Your fist clenches. Your teeth grate.’ ”

The NYT features Max Czollek, a Jewish Millennial author in Germany who “Argues That the Past Isn’t Past.”

Book Riot has a listening pathway for Dion Graham.

The Guardian interviews Roger Robinson, A Portable Paradise (Peepal Tree Press), who just won the TS Eliot prize.

Shondaland interviews Carmen Maria Machado, In the Dream House: A Memoir (Graywolf Press: Macmillan).

Esquire interviews Anna Wiener, Uncanny Valley: A Memoir (MCD: Macmillan).

Electric Lit interviews Garth Greenwell, Cleanness (FSG: Macmillan).

Larry Kramer, The American People: Volume 2: The Brutality of Fact (FSG: Macmillan), answers the NYT’s "By the Book" questions.

In forthcoming book news, Entertainment Weekly reports that Lev Grossman is writing a book for children, “reminiscent of Roald Dahl and The Chronicles of Narnia.” It will be titled The Silver Arrow and arrives on Sept. 1 from Little, Brown: Hachette. EW has an excerpt. Also, Sarah Huckabee Sanders’s memoir gets a title and a release date: Speaking for Myself: Faith, Freedom, and the Fight of Our Lives Inside the Trump White House (St. Martin’s: Macmillan), due out Sept. 8 2020.

Fast Company reports LinkedIn’s SlideShare is a “vast emporium for pirated e-books.”

In The Washington Post, Michael Dirda considers the wider work of Arthur Conan Doyle, focusing on his swashbuckling stories.

Librarian Tracie D. Hall will become ALA’s next Executive Director. ALA sent the news out to members yesterday along with her extensive CV. She will begin work at the end of February and will become the first female African-American executive director in ALA’s history. LJ's InfoDocket has details.

Dave Kim will become a preview editor at the NYT Book Review once Alida Becker retires after 30 years on the job.

Sylvia Jukes Morris has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Authors on Air

Deadline reports the Game of Thrones prequel, House of the Dragon, will air in 2022. It looks like this is the only spin-off for now. The show has implications for the GOT books as George R.R. Martin is writing the scripts. Outlander will continue on its path to a wider universe, with Starz announcing plans for “a slew of spin-offs, sequels and story extensions.” Snowpiercer has a premiere date, May 31. The Dark Tower series is not going forward at Amazon. A few new details are out about HBO Max’s Green Lantern and there are details about the streamer’s Aquaman: King of Atlantic animated mini-series. Also from HBO Max, a new project inspired by David Wallace-Wells’s The Uninhabitable Earth. Chinonye Chukwu will direct the first two episodes of HBO Max Series Americanah. HBO Max plans a Wolfgang Puck documentary series. Vera is getting season 11. The show is based on the novels by Ann Cleeves. It looks like Dublin Murders on Stars will also get a new season.

LitHub lists forthcoming adaptations in 2020.

The Witcher is so popular that Orbit Books is printing 500,000 more copies to meet demand.

The next James Bond will not be a woman. The news came as part of interview in Variety with the Broccolis, the family that controls the franchise.

NPR’s Fresh Air interviews Joe Palazzolo and Michael Rothfeld, The Fixers: The Bottom-Feeders, Crooked Lawyers, Gossipmongers, and Porn Stars Who Created the 45th President (Random House).

The Today show featured Why We Can't Sleep: Women's New Midlife Crisis by Ada Calhoun (Grove Press; LJ starred review).

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Author Image
Neal Wyatt

nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

Neal Wyatt is LJ’s readers’ advisory columnist, contributing The Reader’s Shelf, Book Pulse, and Wyatt’s World columns. She is the coauthor of The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction, 3d ed. (ALA Editions, 2019). Contact her at nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

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