Awards Longlists and Shortlists, May 8, 2019 | Book Pulse

More award longlists and shortlists are out. Translations get some attention, as does historical fiction. The Star Wars book slate gets some buzz. Intercepted by Alexa Martin is headed to Starz.

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Awards

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Arthur C. Clarke Award announces its shortlist.

The Locus Award finalists are out.

The Agatha Awards announce their nominees.

The Orwell Prizes announces its longlist.

Reviews

NYT reviews No Visible Bruises: What We Don’t Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us by Rachel Louise Snyder (Bloomsbury: Macmillan): "extraordinary ... This is a writer using every tool at her disposal to make this story come alive, to make it matter." Also, Our Man: Richard Holbrooke and the End of the American Century by George Packer (Knopf; LJ starred reviews): "hefty, dishy ... it’s best appreciated like a novel, consumed whole." Becoming Dr. Seuss: Theodor Geisel and the Making of an American Imagination by Brian Jay Jones (Dutton: Penguin; LJ starred review): "it works." Democracy May Not Exist, but We'll Miss It When It's Gone by Astra Taylor (Metropolitan: Macmillan): "An impressive contribution to this anxious re-examination of political assumptions and practices ... an idiosyncratic rumination on problems associated with popular self-government." The Unpassing by Chia-Chia Lin (FSG: Macmillan): "a singularly vast and captivating novel, beautifully written in free-flowing prose that quietly disarms with its intermittent moments of poetic idiosyncrasy. But what makes Lin’s novel such an important book is the extent to which it probes America’s mythmaking about itself, which can just as easily unmake as it can uplift." The Binding by Bridget Collins (William Morrow: Harper; LJ starred review): "succeeds in creating the magic it proposes."

The Washington Post reviews With the Fire on High by Elizabeth Acevedo (HarperTeen): "transcends old tropes, letting us into the mind and heart of a teenager as she struggles with how to follow her dreams — and whether she should." Also, It's Great to Suck at Something: The Unexpected Joy of Wiping Out and What It Can Teach Us About Patience, Resilience, and the Stuff that Really Matters by Karen Rinaldi (Atria: S. & S.): "feels more like a movement than just another self-help guide." A Good Enough Mother by Bev Thomas (Pamela Dorman: Penguin): "a taut, intelligent psychological thriller."

NPR reviews Rough Magic: Riding the World's Loneliest Horse Race by Lara Prior-Palmer (Catapult): "Thanks to Prior-Palmer's excellent prose and rigorous honesty, Rough Magic is ... an unusual pleasure to read." Also, Becoming Dr. Seuss: Theodor Geisel and the Making of an American Imagination by Brian Jay Jones (Dutton: Penguin; LJ starred review): "Nuanced, profoundly human and painstakingly researched ...perhaps the most complete, multidimensional look at the life of one of the most beloved authors and illustrators of our time." The Pioneers: The Heroic Story of the Settlers Who Brought the American Ideal West by David McCullough (S. & S.): "an excellent book that's likely to appeal to anyone with an abiding interest in early American history. Both readable and packed with information drawn from painstaking research, The Pioneers is a worthy addition to McCullough's impressive body of work."

Entertainment Weekly reviews With the Fire on High by Elizabeth Acevedo (HarperTeen), giving it a B+ and writing "a worthy follow-up to Acevedo’s nationally lauded debut."

Briefly Noted

Vulture showcases Samanta Schweblin and asks "Will Translated Fiction Ever Really Break Through?" as they offer a list of "15 Must-Read Translated Books From the Past 5 Years."

The NYT asks "Why Are We Living in a Golden Age of Historical Fiction?"

Lucasfilm announces the publishing slate leading up to the next Star Wars film, including a lead book by Rebecca Roanhorse. The Hollywood Reporter has news on the films themselves.

Vulture picks the "8 New Books You Should Read This May."

USA Today spotlights Where the Light Enters: Building a Family, Discovering Myself by Jill Biden (Flatiron Books: Macmillan).

Entertainment Weekly features Let Love Have the Last Word: A Memoir by Common (Atria: S. & S.).

Vulture has a piece on Ani DiFranco, No Walls and the Recurring Dream: A Memoir (Viking: Penguin).

Entertainment Weekly excerpts Fargo: This Is a True Story by Noah Hawley (Grand Central: Hachette).

Entertainment Weekly interviews Lara Prior-Palmer, Rough Magic: Riding the World's Loneliest Horse Race (Catapult).

The Guardian writes that the Dickens novel taken on the Scott Antarctic exploration is going on display. It "still bears a faint whiff of smoke and fish."

In forthcoming books, Liz Phair is writing Horror Stories: A Memoir (Random House). Paste has details.

The NYT has a reading list now that Meghan and Harry have had a baby.

Time excerpts Nuking the Moon: And Other Intelligence Schemes and Military Plots Left on the Drawing Board by Vince Houghton (Penguin) as well as Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee by Casey Cep (Knopf).

Electric Lit has "A Book Nerd's Guide To The 2019 Met Gala."

Entertainment Weekly reports that the forces behind How to Skimm Your Life by The Skimm (Ballantine: Random House) are going on a book tour.

The NYT writes about The Adventures of Augie March by Saul Bellow (Penguin), which has been adapted into a play.

Nurit Karlin has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Authors on Air

Deadline Hollywood reports Intercepted by Alexa Martin is headed to Starz. The Owners comic by Herrmann and Yves H is set for the movies. Maisie Williams will feature. Accepted by Melissa Korn and Jen Levitz (Portfolio) is headed for TV.

IndieWire reports that Thomas Savage’s The Power of the Dog is headed to the movies, directed by Jane Campion.

The Wrap writes that Sadako Sasaki's Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes is as well.

Batwoman, on The CW, gets a teaser.

NPR interviews Rachel Louise Snyder, No Visible Bruises: What We Don’t Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us (Bloomsbury: Macmillan).

Jill Biden, Where the Light Enters: Building a Family, Discovering Myself (Flatiron: Macmillan) will be on The View today. E.L. James, The Mister (Vintage: Random House) will be on the Wendy Williams show.

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