Authors in Conversation, Oct. 16, 2019 | Book Pulse

Margaret Atwood and Bernardine Evaristo, Ben Lerner and Ocean Vuong, and Ann Patchett and Elizbeth Strout feature in conversations. Venom two is reportedly set for Oct. 2, 2020, and will introduce another Marvel character, Shriek. The November LibraryReads list is out. Tiger Woods plans a memoir.

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Authors in Conversation

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Guardian interviews the new Booker Prize winners. The paper further reports on the backlash over the granting of two award winners.

LitHub has Ben Lerner and Ocean Vuong in conversation.

Ann Patchett and Elizbeth Strout talk books, reading, and Instagram in Entertainment Weekly.

Reviews

USA Today reviews Steph Cha's Your House Will Pay (Ecco: Harper; LJ starred review), giving it 3 stars and writing it is “an impassioned thriller … a page-turner and a prompt to confront.”

NPR reviews The Compatriots: The Brutal and Chaotic History of Russia's Exiles, Émigrés, and Agents Abroad by Andrei Soldatov, Irina Borogan (PublicAffairs: Hachette): “written in pithy language and reads like a bunch of Hollywood plots bundled together into one mind-bending narrative.” Also, The Body: A Guide for Occupants by Bill Bryson (Doubleday: Random House): “A fairly straightforward traipse through organs or organ … the sort of book that makes one wonder how it is that Bryson lost his magic touch in making very big books transcend the common textbook.” Olive, Again by Elizabeth Strout (Random House; LJ starred review): “just as wonderful as the original.” Girl by Edna O'Brien (FSG: Macmillan; LJ starred review): “O'Brien has no intention of letting the reader look away, even for a second.”

The Washington Post reviews The Man Who Saw Everything by Deborah Levy (Bloomsbury: Macmillan): “Elliptical, elusive and endlessly stimulating.” Also, in a piece written by author Amy Stewart, Curious Toys by Elizabeth Hand (Mulholland: Hachette, LJ starred review): “kaleidoscopic … With short, breathlessly paced chapters and constantly shifting points of view ... like a carnival ride: alternatively dazzling and terrifying, disorienting and marvelous.” Frankissstein by Jeanette Winterson (Grove Press; LJ starred review): “a brainy, batty story — an unholy amalgamation of scholarship and comedy.” Also, a gathering of new poetry books.

Entertainment Weekly reviews Elton John's Me (Henry Holt: Macmillan), giving it an A- and calling it “a riveting, laugh-til-you-cry, heartfelt page-turner.” EW has more on the memoir here.

The NYT reviews Barack and Joe: The Making of an Extraordinary Partnership by Steven Levingston (Hachette): ”frequently reads like a rehash of episodes and events that are already well known, with seemingly minor matters being afforded undue significance if only because they’ve previously been well documented.”

Briefly Noted

The November LibraryReads list is out. Erin Morgenstern’s The Starless Sea (Doubleday: Random House; LJ starred review) is the No. 1 pick for the month.

In forthcoming book news, Tiger Woods is writing a memoir to be titled Back (Harper). Entertainment Weekly has what few details have been released.

Document has a booklist created by rapper (and saver of a bookstore) Talib Kweli.

Entertainment Weekly excerpts Children of Virtue and Vengeance by Tomi Adeyemi (Henry Holt: Macmillan).

Jezebel excerpts Good Things Happen to People You Hate: Essays by Rebecca Fishbein (William Morrow: Harper).

CrimeReads interviews Joyce Carol Oates.

Shondaland has an interview with Cyntoia Brown-Long, Free Cyntoia: My Search for Redemption in the American Prison System (Atria: S. & S.).

Entertainment Weekly interviews Jenny Slate, Little Weirds (Little, Brown: Hachette).

USA Today interviews Ronan Farrow, Catch and Kill: Lies, Spies, and a Conspiracy to Protect Predators (Little, Brown: Hachette). Vanity Fair has more on the book, NBC News, and Farrow.

The Guardian interviews Jung Chang, Big Sister, Little Sister, Red Sister: Three Women at the Heart of Twentieth-Century China (Knopf).

LitHub considers the newest book, and entire literary career, of Edna O’Brien. That newest book is Girl (FSG: Macmillan; LJ starred review).

The L.A. Times features Julie Andrews, Home Work: A Memoir of My Hollywood Years (Hachette; LJ starred review). So does O: The Oprah Magazine and People.

Time spotlights Elton John, Me (Henry Holt: Macmillan). Vulture has coverage too, and here. Vanity Fair has a story as well.

Bitch Magazine features Leah Vernon, Unashamed: Musings of a Fat, Black Muslim (Beacon Press: Random House). LitHub also reports.

People features Spirit Hacking: Shamanic Keys to Reclaim Your Personal Power, Transform Yourself, and Light Up the World by Shaman Durek (St. Martin’s Essentials: Macmillan), also a story on Good Husbandry: A Memoir by Kristin Kimball (Scribner: S. & S.) and a series of stories related to Ronan Farrow's Catch and Kill: Lies, Spies, and a Conspiracy to Protect Predators (Little, Brown: Hachette) (here and here and here).

The NYT apprises Harold Bloom, writing he might be “the Last of a Kind.” Time also has an appreciation.

The Stylist features Kaizen: The Japanese Secret to Lasting Change—Small Steps to Big Goals by Sarah Harvey (The Experiment: Workman).

The Atlantic has a piece about Michelle Martin, who teaches at the Information School at the University of Washington and holds The Beverly Cleary Endowed Professorship in Children and Youth Services, and how every child can come to love books.

The Oxford English Dictionary adds Star Wars terms. Entertainment Weekly reports.

Dublin hopes to repatriate the remains of James Joyce and his wife Nora Barnacle. The Guardian reports.

USA Today writes that “The University of Wyoming might lose the papers of a longtime "Superman" comic book editor after his son took offense to comments by Congresswoman Liz Cheney … Weisinger says he does not want his father's papers at a university represented by a member of Congress he perceives as opposing Superman's values of ‘truth, justice and the American way.’"

Hachette has a new imprint, Hachette Go, focused on nonfiction health, self-help, food, how-to, and more.

Poet Kate Braverman has died. The L.A. Times has an obituary.

Authors on Air

NPR’s Fresh Air interviews Ronan Farrow, Catch and Kill: Lies, Spies, and a Conspiracy to Protect Predators (Little, Brown: Hachette).

NPR’s Morning Edition interviews Julie Andrews, Home Work: A Memoir of My Hollywood Years (Hachette; LJ starred review).

NPR interviews Amaryllis Fox, Life Undercover: Coming of Age in the CIA (Knopf) (there is a second story here).

PBS NewsHour interviews Elizabeth Strout, Olive, Again (Random House; LJ starred review).

Nancy Pearl interviews Lauren Kessler, A Grip of Time: When Prison Is Your Life (Red Lightning Books), on her Book Lust program.

Esquire has a story on the original Watchmen heroes. The NYT also writes about Watchmen, here too.

The Crown TV show is getting another companion book, The Crown: The Official Companion, Volume 2: Political Scandal, Personal Struggle, and the Years that Defined Elizabeth II (1956-1977) by Robert Lacey (Crown: Random House). The first one, The Crown: The Official Companion, Volume 1: Elizabeth II, Winston Churchill, and the Making of a Young Queen (1947-1955), also by Lacey, came out in 2017. Town and Country reports.

The Today show featured I Really Needed This Today: Words to Live By by Hoda Kotb (G.P. Putnam’s Sons: Penguin), Mixtape Potluck Cookbook: A Dinner Party for Friends, Their Recipes, and the Songs They Inspire by Questlove (Abrams Image), Home Work: A Memoir of My Hollywood Years by Julie Andrews (Hachette; LJ starred review), and Free Cyntoia: My Search for Redemption in the American Prison System by Cyntoia Brown-Long (Atria: S. & S.).

Fox News features Mike Rowe, The Way I Heard It: True Tales for the Curious Mind with a Short Attention Span (Gallery Books: S. & S.).

Deadline reports that Jodi Picoult’s A Spark of Light is headed to Sony TV for a limited series. Joey King is set to star. HBO plans an adaptation of The Most Fun We Ever Had by Claire Lombardo, to be created by the production companies of Amy Adams and Laura Dern. Netflix is planning a holiday series based on the Dash & Lily books by Rachel Cohn and David Levithan. The indie film company Oscilloscope Laboratories is getting into publishing. Venom two is reportedly set for October 2, 2020, and will introduce another Marvel character, Shriek.

The Hollywood Reporter’s list of The Most Powerful People in Entertainment 2019 features a number of industry leaders who are also authors, including Tiffany Haddish, Issa Rae, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Will Smith, Kevin Hart, Phoebe Waller-Bridge, Stephen King, Barack and Michelle Obama, Ellen DeGeneres, Jordan Peele, Tyler Perry, Oprah Winfrey, and Bob Iger.

Cyntoia Brown-Long, Free Cyntoia: My Search for Redemption in the American Prison System (Atria: S. & S.), and Ali Wong, Dear Girls: Intimate Tales, Untold Secrets & Advice for Living Your Best Life (Random House), will be on The Daily Show. Chelsea Clinton, The Book of Gutsy Women: Favorite Stories of Courage and Resilience (S. & S.), will guest host The View.

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