What College Students Want (in the library), Lasers!, and Going Fine Free | Around the Web, Oct. 11, 2019

Each week, the hardworking editors of LJ scour the smorgasbord that is the internet to bring you the juiciest morsels of library news and views. This week, many feathers were ruffled and opinions shared about a story in The Atlantic on college students just wanting plain, old-fashioned shush factories. Elsewhere, scientists used fancy lasers to examine ancient Roman scrolls, more large urban library systems are going fine free, and Book Riot takes a look at the reading tastes of the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates.

Each week, the hardworking editors of LJ scour the smorgasbord that is the internet to bring you the juiciest morsels of library news and views. This week, many feathers were ruffled and opinions shared about a story in The Atlantic on college students just wanting plain, old-fashioned shush factories. Elsewhere, scientists used fancy lasers to examine ancient Roman scrolls, more large urban library systems are going fine free, and Book Riot takes a look at the reading tastes of the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates.

College Students Just Want Normal Libraries via The Atlantic

Endurance Tests: Innovation or preservation? Let's have both. via Inside Higher Ed

college students reading in the library

Indiana library digitizing voices of 1937 flood survivors via Daily Herald

Scientists use powerful light beams to virtually unwrap, decipher 2 scrolls from Roman library via WaPo

Hamilton and Six Nations public libraries announce partnership via The Spec

Fines for Overdue Library Books Could Become a Thing of the Past in Philly via Philly Mag

Chicago Got Rid Of Late Book Fees At Public Libraries, Will NYC Do The Same? via Gothamist

Book Refuge is bringing mini-libraries to London homeless shelters via The Big Issue

Queens Library will take steps to fix Hunters Point branch’s accessibility problem via Curbed New York

A 2020 Census Toolkit for Libraries via California Library Association

What the 2020 Democratic Presidential Candidates Call Their Favorite Books via Book Riot

Marginalized Communities, Indigenous Histories, and Bat Girl the Librarian via Book Marks/LitHub

Fifty-seven public libraries awarded funding to encourage Affordable Care Act enrollment via ALA

American Archives Month: The Power of Collaboration via Society of American Archivists

Tiny Library Toolkit Inspires New Approaches to Library Services via ALA

How my local library changed my life via Penguin UK

How Honolulu’s Japanese, Spurned At The Library, Made Their Own Bookstore Culture via Honolulu Civil Beat

Public Library Comes To The Rescue For People Needing Power In El Dorado Hills via CBS Sacramento

Nas next to Mozart? Why not?: Harvard archive shines an academic light on the social, poetic, and musical complexities of hip-hop via Harvard Gazette

Vast scientific archive poised to hit the net in March via Ed Technology

Gouldsboro woman to hike Appalachian Trail to raise money for library staff via Central Maine

In the UK, the ‘Library of the Future’ Looks a Lot Like Lego via Publishing Perspectives

Army says decision to close Redstone Arsenal library was unanimous via AL.com

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gel dom

Libraries pulled through, of course, but then the rise of the internet renewed fears of obsolescence. So far, the internet has not killed libraries either. But the percentage of higher-education budgets dedicated to libraries has been dwindling since the 1980s, and at many institutions there’s been a corresponding drop in reported spending on print materials while that on electronic resources has grown.

Posted : Oct 14, 2019 02:01


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