Amanda Lohrey Wins the Miles Franklin Award | Book Pulse

Amanda Lohrey wins the 2021 Miles Franklin Literary Award for The Labyrinth and also, the 2021 NYSCA/NYFA Artist Fellows and 2022 International Booker Prize Judges are announced. The Paper Palace by Miranda Cowley Heller, Falling by T.J. Newman, and Nine Lives by Danielle Steel top the best sellers lists. Interviews arrive with Kyle Lucia Wu of Win Me Something, Pik Shuen-Fung of Ghost Forest, T. L. Huchu of The Library of the Dead, P. Djèlí Clark of A Master of Djinn, and Tia Williams of Seven Days in June. Vanessa Lachey has a new book, Life From Scratch: Family Traditions That Start With You, set to come out this fall. Cixin Liu’s The Three-Body Problem audiobook will be released as a podcast.

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Awards & News

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amanda Lohrey wins the 2021 Miles Franklin Literary Award for The Labyrinth (Text Publishing).

The 2021 NYSCA/NYFA Artist Fellows are announced.

The 2022 International Booker Prize Judges are announced.

New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

Fiction

The Paper Palace by Miranda Cowley Heller (Riverhead) debuts at No. 1 on both the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Falling by T.J. Newman (Avid Reader; LJ starred review) rises to No. 2 on both the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Nine Lives by Danielle Steel (Delacorte: Random House) starts at No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 4 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Razorblade Tears by S.A. Cosby (Flatiron; LJ starred review) slices to No. 10 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Nonfiction

How I Saved the World by Jesse Wattersstarts at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

This Is Your Mind on Plants by Michael Pollan (Penguin Pr.; LJ starred review) grows to No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Trejo: My Life of Crime, Redemption, and Hollywood by Danny Trejo with Donal Logue (Atria; LJ starred review) debuts at No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Fox and I by Catherine Raven (Speigel & Grau: Ingram) lives at No. 10 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Forget the Alamo: The Rise and Fall of an American Myth by Bryan Burrough, Chris Tomlinson, and Jason Stanford (Penguin Pr.; LJ starred review) climbs to No. 11 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

First Friends: The Powerful, Unsung (And Unelected) People Who Shaped Our Presidents by Gary Ginsberg (Twelve: Hachette) rises to No. 15 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

NYT reviews Intimacies by Katie Kitamura (Riverhead): “With “Intimacies,” Kitamura has delivered a taut, moody novel that moves purposefully between worlds.”

The Washington Post reviews The Flowering: The Autobiography of Judy Chicago by Judy Chicago (Thames & Hudson: W. W. Norton): "In the meantime, “The Flowering” is a revealing account of an artist of grit and gumption who set the pattern for much of the art being made today."

USA Today reviews The Final Girl Support Group by Grady Hendrix (Berkley; LJ starred review): "It’s a thin and bloody line that separates horror fun from the truly horrific, and Grady has a lot of fun walking it as he writes his final girls a triumphant conclusion rarely afforded survivors in real life."

Los Angeles Times reviews The Letters of Shirley Jackson by Shirley Jackson (Random): “Reading these letters is just as enjoyable as reading Jackson’s fictions — filled with the same intensity that entertained her friends and children as well as recurring glimpses of whatever dark demon was riding her into the ground.”

NPR reviews A Passage North by Anuk Arudpragasam (Hogarth: Crown): “Early in the story, when describing why he was compelled to research the war obsessively, Krishan says he had been "trying to construct, through this act of imagination, a kind of private shrine to the memory of all those anonymous lives." A Passage North is a similar wholehearted and necessary act of preservation by its author.”

Locus Magazine reviews Subdivision by J. Robert Lennon (Graywolf: Macmillan): “Subdivision, playful, surreal, edged with darkness, is another terrific novel from an author you may not have heard of, but who certainly should be on your radar.”

Book Marks has "5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week."

Briefly Noted

Kyle Lucia Wu, author of Win Me Something (Tin House: W.W. Norton) interviews Pik Shuen-Fung, Ghost Forest (One World; LJ starred review), about her debut novel and the “uncertainty of the literary process” for Bomb Magazine

CrimeReads features an interview with Jordan Harper, author of She Rides Shotgun (Ecco: HarperCollins), about his writing process.

Vanessa Lachey has a new book, Life From Scratch: Family Traditions That Start With You (HarperOne: HarperCollins), set to come out this fall, about her family life and learning from her mistakes.

NYT profiles Akash Kapur, author of Better to Have Gone: Love, Death, and the Quest for Uptopia in Auroville (Scribner: S. & S.), and gives historical context to the community in which he grew up. Also, a piece on "The Sneaky Subverisveness of Laurie Colwin." 

The New Yorker profiles Jenny Erpenbeck, Not a Novel: A Memoir in Pieces (New Directions: W. W. Norton), about the importance of saving history.

Matt Bell, author of Appleseed (Custom House: HarperCollins), writes a piece about the importance of “heeding the dire climate warnings of our best literary prophets” for Lit Hub. Also, Lily Meyer reflects on translating the work of Claudia Ulloa Donoso.

Oprah Daily has an excerpt of Seek You: A Journey Through American Loneliness by Kristen Radtke (Pantheon; LJ starred review).

Tor.com has an excerpt of The Last House on Needless Street by Catriona Ward (Tor Nightfire: Macmillan).

Cynthia Cruz recommends books by Didier Eribon, Mark Fisher, Claire Lispector, and more for Lit Hub.

Tor.com lists “Five Speculative Visions of a Future America.”

The Millions shares “Top Ten: June 2021.”

Lit Hub provides “5 Books You May Have Missed in June.”

Entertainment Weekly has “12 authors on their must-read summer thriller picks.”

Authors on Air

Voyage Into Genre! is a new podcast with Tor Books and Literary Hub this week featuring interviews with Tor authors T. L. Huchu, The Library of the Dead, P. Djèlí Clark, A Master of Djinn (Tor.com; LJ starred review), and Kamau Ware, founder of the Black Gotham Experience. Lit Hub has more.

Cixin Liu’s The Three-Body Problem (Tor: Macmillan) audiobook will be released as a podcast. Tor.com has more information.

Matt Bell, author of Appleseed (Custom House: HarperCollins) speaks with Brad Listi on the Otherppl podcast about how speculative fiction can help solve crises.

Tia Williams, Seven Days in June (Grand Central), speaks about “the meta experience of writing about black authors in a white publishing industry” on the Reading Women podcast.

Maris Kreizman interviews Kristen Radtke, author of Seek You: A Journey Through American Loneliness (Pantheon; LJ starred review) for The Maris Review podcast about how loneliness affects humans biologically.

Maria Konnikova, The Biggest Bluff (Penguin) speaks on Just the Right Books with Roxanne Coady podcast about what poker taught her about the American Dream.

Jabari Asim, author of Yonder (S. & S.) reflects on the discourse about racism and police brutality and also reads from his book for the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast.

Simon Clark, The Key Man: The True Story of How the Global Elite Was Duped by a Capitalist Fairy Tale (Harper Business: HarperCollins) speaks on the Keen On podcast about "how Arif Naqvi duped Bill Gates and the Global Elite."


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