2021 Age Book of the Year Shortlist Announced | Book Pulse

Shortlists are out for both the Age Book of the Year and the Wainwright Prize. The 2021 Climate Imagination Fellows are announced. Not a Happy Family by Shari Lapena, Devil in Disguise by Lisa Kleypas, Claimed by J.R. Ward, and The Authoritarian Moment by Ben Shapiro top the best sellers lists. A new Mel Brooks memoir, All About Me! My Remarkable Life in Show Businesswill be published on November 30. Adaptation news arrives for The Lord of the Rings, Shibumi by Trevanian, and The Shining by Stephen King. Interviews with Peter L. Bergen of The Rise and Fall of Osama bin Laden, Michael Knox Beran of WASPS: The Splendors and Miseries of an American Aristocracy, and Nadia Owusu of Aftershocks arrive as well.

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The 2021 Age Book of the Year shortlist is announced. It is "one of the most prestigious literary prizes in Australia," wites The Age paper.

The 2021 Wainwright Prize for U.K. Nature Writing shortlist is announced.

The 2021 Climate Imagination Fellows are announced.

New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

Fiction

Not a Happy Family by Shari Lapena (Pamela Dorman Books) debuts at No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 11 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Devil in Disguise by Lisa Kleypas (Avon) uncovers No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Claimed by J.R. Ward (Pocket Books) holds No. 5 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Nonfiction

The Authoritarian Moment by Ben Shapiro (Broadside: HarperCollins) debuts at No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 6 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Reviews

NYT reviews New Teeth by Simon Rich (Little, Brown, & Co.): “Analyzing why it’s so pleasurable to read Simon Rich is about as helpful as analyzing why it’s so fun to spend the night with an unexpectedly excellent blind date. It’s better to do it than to talk about it.” Also, Blind Man's Bluff by James Tate Hill (W. W. Norton): "It’s hard to get the tone of a memoir right — too easy on yourself and it sounds like boasting, too hard and the reader wonders why anybody would spend time with you. It feels as if Hill leaned on Option 2. He comes off as a jerk for much of the book, too stoic to open up to the people who care about him, too hardheaded to make life easier for himself."

USA Today reviews The Quiet Zone: Unraveling the Mystery of a Town Suspended in Silence by Stephen Kurczy (Dey Street: HarperCollins): "What makes this book formidable is Kurczy’s relentless investigating, though readers will occasionally feel exhausted by his tendency to over-interview, over-detail and over-report."

The Washington Post reviews Napoleon: A Life Told in Gardens and Shadows by Ruth Scurr (Liveright: Norton): “Throughout this unusual biography, Scurr — hitherto best known for a delightful, quotation-rich account of the 17th-century antiquary and gossip John Aubrey — elegantly explores Napoleon’s inner Rousseau, the 18th-century philosopher who extolled nature and the simple life. Among the vast acreage of Napoleonic studies, it’s good to have at least one book that emphasizes flower beds instead of battlefields.” Also, Empire’s Eagles: The Fate of the Napoleonic Elite in America by Thomas E. Crocker (Prometheus): “A scholar of early American history, Crocker opens with a riveting day-by-day account of Napoleon in the port city of Rochefort, waiting to escape from France, perhaps to Baltimore, where his younger brother Jerome had once been married to a local belle named Elizabeth Patterson.”

Book Marks has "5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week."

Briefly Noted

CrimeReads features an excerpt of Stephen Kurczy’s The Quiet Zone: Unraveling the Mystery of a Town Suspended in Silence (Dey Street: HarperCollins).

Tor.com has an excerpt of Once Upon a Broken Heart by Stephanie Garber (Flatiron: Macmillan) and a cover reveal and excerpt for Hotel Magnifique by Emily J. Taylor (Razorbill: Penguin).

Entertainment Weekly has an excerpt and cover reveal for Book Lovers by Emily Henry (Berkley: Penguin Random House). Also, an interview with Reginald Hudlin and Leon Chills who are “excited to bring Milestone’s Black superheroes into the 21st century.”

LitHub reports on a cover reveal for Hanya Yanagihara’s latest book, To Paradise (Doubleday). 

Kate Zambreno, To Write As If Already Dead (Columbia University Press), speaks with Observer about "writing as a mother under capitalism."

Margot Mifflin, Looking for Miss America: A Pageant’s 100-Year Quest to Define Womanhood (Counterpoint), answers the Book Marks Questionnaire. Elizabeth Egan explores the "inside of the best-seller list" for NYT.

Katherine Ashenburg, author of Her Turn (HarperCollins), writes a piece for Lit Hub reflecting on "thought-provoking infidelity narratives."

The Hollywood Reporter speaks with DC Comics executives Jim Lee and Daniel Cherry III about “future-proofing” publishing

Tor.com features an article on She Who Became the Sun by Shelley Parker-Chan (Tor; LJ starred review) on “rewriting the tradition [of] destiny and diaspora.”

A new Mel Brooks memoir, All About Me! My Remarkable Life in Show Business (Ballantine: Random House), will be published on November 30. Deadline reports.

CrimeReads provides "The Bleakest Noir: A List of Ultra-Dark Thrillers."

Book Marks lists “August’s Best Sci-Fi and Fantasy Books.”

Tor.com has “All the New Science Fiction Books Arriving in August!”

The Washington Post provides “The 5 best new thrillers and mysteries to read in August.”

NYT has pieces on “Newly Published, From Octogenarian Marathoners to a Haunted Southern Plantation Wedding” and “4 Visual Books to Read This Week.”

More news on the death of Scholastic CEO M. Richard Robinson Jr. People reports.

Jonathan Rinzler, author of books on the making of Star Wars, Indiana Jones, Alien, and The Shining, dies at the age of 58. Deadline has more.

Rock Journalist Patricia Kennealy-Morrison dies at 75NYT has the news.

Authors on Air

Nadia Owusu, Aftershocks (S. & S.) chats with Jordan Kisner about revelations about her family, the subject of madness, and embracing that which has changed her life on the Thresholds podcast.

NPR’s Fresh Air interviews Peter L. Bergen, author of The Rise and Fall of Osama bin Laden (S. & S.) about the research he did for the book and some insights he made along the way.

Amazon’s The Lord of the Rings adaptation will premiere on September 2, 2022. Variety has more.

Shibumi by Trevanian (Crown: Random House) will be adapted for Warner Bros by Chad Stahelski. Deadline reports. Also, Overlook, based on The Shining by Stephen King, will not be produced by HBO Max and is looking for another platform.

Hosts of the Reading Women podcast recommend books on nature writing in their current episode.

Michael Knox Beran, author of WASPS: The Splendors and Miseries of an American Aristocracy (Pegasus: S. & S.) speaks about “the rise and fall of the distinctly American phenomenon that is White Anglo-Saxon Protestant culture” with the Keen On podcast. Also, Edward J. Watts, The Eternal Decline and Fall of Rome: The History of a Dangerous Idea (Oxford Univ.) discusses "the dangerous rhetoric of decline."

Kelsey McKinney, God Spare the Girls (William Morrow: HarperCollins) discusses "megachurches, girlhood, and staying faithful to her book" on The Maris Review podcast.


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