Adaptations Make News, Sept. 11, 2019 | Book Pulse

The Institute by Stephen King is getting adapted for TV. Dark Harvest by Norman Partridge is set for the movies. Starz is going to air Dublin Murders, based on the Tana French books. Apple TV gets into the adaptation business with Foundation, Dickinson, Lisey's Story, The Morning Show, Pachinko, and more.

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Adaptations Make News

The Institute by Stephen King is getting adapted for TV. Entertainment Weekly has details.

Deadline reports that Dark Harvest by Norman Partridge is set for the movies. Starz is going to air Dublin Murders, based on the Tana French books.

The Hollywood Reporter has a list of all the Apple TV shows, some have literary connections, such as Foundation, Dickinson, Lisey's Story, The Morning Show, Pachinko, and more.

Reviews

The Washington Post reviews Akin by Emma Donoghue (Little, Brown: Hachette): “a sweet novel laced with horror.” The paper also picks children's and YA books for the month.

The NYT reviews The Accusation: Blood Libel in an American Town by Edward Berenson (W.W. Norton): “reminds us that what seems inconceivable is nonetheless possible.” Also, Transaction Man: The Rise of the Deal and the Decline of the American Dream by Nicholas Lemann (FSG: Macmillan; LJ starred review): “It is a story about a battle of ideas between the people who built postwar American culture and their critics.”

Briefly Noted

O: The Oprah Magazine has lists: “18 Must-Read Books of Fall 2019” and “25 Best Fall Books to Add to Your Autumn Reading List."

Bustle writes “In A Reading Slump? 20 Captivating New Books From 2019 To Snap You Out Of It.”

BuzzFeed supplies “18 Books From Smaller Publishers That Deserve Your Attention.”

Paste offers “Seven New Books to Read After The Handmaid’s Tale.

Vulture lists artist “Julio Torres’s 10 Favorite Books.”

Tayari Jones writes that Red at the Bone by Jacqueline Woodson (Riverhead: Penguin) “is as moody, spare, and intense as a Picasso line drawing.” Amy Bloom writes that Ann Patchett’s The Dutch House (Harper) is “masterful.”

Time considers "the Most Mysterious Parts of The Testaments, With a Little Help From Margaret Atwood.”

Vulture features In the Dream House: A Memoir by Carmen Maria Machado (Graywolf Press: Macmillan), calling it an “emotional exorcism.”

USA Today features Neil Patrick Harris, and his new book The Magic Misfits: The Minor Third (Little, Brown: Hachette).

Elle features She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement by Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, (Penguin).

Tor.com focuses on Pet by Akwaeke Emezi (Make Me a World: Random House; SLJ starred review).

The Atlantic highlights The Topeka School by Ben Lerner (FSG: Macmillan).

Vox writes that Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir (Tor.com: Macmillan) “is about lesbian necromancers in space. Obviously, it’s perfect … sharp, unsettling, and so much fun.”

Fox News features Johnny Cash: The Redemption of an American Icon by Greg Laurie, with Marshall Terrill (Salem Books: Regnery)

Electric Lit interviews Amitav Ghosh, Gun Island (FSG: Macmillan).

Bitch Media interviews BriAnne Wills, Girls and Their Cats: (Cat Photography Book, Inspirational Book for Women Cat Lovers) (Chronicle).

In forthcoming book news, The Guardian writes that Thomas Piketty has a new book on capitalism coming out, Capital and Ideology. It will publish in France this week but an English translation is not due until early next year.

Tor.com excerpts Steel Crow Saga by Paul Krueger (Del Rey: Random House; LJ starred review) and also A Hero Born: The Definitive Edition by Jin Yong, translated by Anna Holmwood (St. Martin’s Press: Macmillan) (more here).

Entertainment Weekly excerpts Stephen King's The Institute, which came out yesterday.

The Atlantic writes "Malcolm Gladwell Reaches His Tipping Point: After 20 years, has the author’s formula at last been exhausted?” Related, Entertainment Weekly features the audiobook version of Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know about the People We Don't Know(Unabridged) read by Malcolm Gladwell (Little, Brown: Hachette).

Author Roshani Chokshi, The Silvered Serpents (Wednesday Books: Macmillan), writes about friendship for Shondaland.

The Washington Post writes about the CIA review, pending, of Life Undercover: Coming of Age in the CIA by Amaryllis Fox (Knopf).

Book Riot has 3 reading pathways for Jodi Picoult.

Tor.com looks at gender and the Hugo awards.

Vice writes about libraries scanning books “that are secretly in the public domain.”

Book Marks’s Secrets of the Book Critics column returns with a focus on Jess Bergman.

Angela Carter’s London home gets a blue plaque by English Heritage. The Guardian reports.

Editor Susan Kamil has died. The NYT has an obituary. Also, a remembrance from Ruth Reichl.

Robert Frank, the famous photographer, has died. The NYT has an obituary. PBS NewsHour also has coverage. Here too. One of his books is rising on Amazon, The Americans by Robert Frank and Jack Kerouac (Steidl).

Jan Ruff-O’Herne has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Immanuel Wallerstein has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Authors on Air

Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement (Penguin), featured on NPR’s Fresh Air yesterday.

NPR interviews Christopher Ingraham, If You Lived Here You’d Be Home By Now: Why We Traded the Commuting Life for a Little House on the Prairie (Harper).

PBS NewsHour catches viewers up with Downton Abbey.

Builder Brothers: Better Together by Drew Scott, Jonathan Scott, illustrated by Kim Smith (HarperCollins) featured on the Today show, boosting sales.

Uncanny Magazine has a YouTube talk show. Tor.com reports.

Nancy Pearl interviews Karl Marlantes, Deep River (Atlantic Monthly Press).

Stephen King will be on with Stephen Colbert tonight.

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