'White Fragility' & New Kevin Kwan Top Bestseller Lists | Book Pulse

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo continues to top the bestseller lists while Kevin Kwan’s Sex and Vanity leads six new titles onto the lists as well. Trump family lawyers are still trying to block Mary Trump’s book, even as more newspapers offer outtakes and reviews. Ernest Cline, Philip Pullman, and Pete Buttigieg have new work on the way and Gary Larson has posted new comics. Nan A. Talese announces her retirement and Phoebe Robinson starts an imprint at PRH.

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Antiracist Bestsellers

Antiracist titles continue to fill the bestsellers lists, with the top sellers are remaining largely consistent. Here are the links for the week: NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list, the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list, and the USA Today Best-Selling Books:

 

 

 

 

 

 

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon): No. 1 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

How To Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (One World: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi (Nation): No. 2 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 10 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo (Seal: Hachette; LJ starred review): No. 3 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): No. 4 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 5 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?: And Other Conversations About Race by Beverly Daniel Tatum (Basic Books: Hachette): No. 6 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House): No. 7 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Me and White Supremacy: Combat Racism, Change the World, and Become a Good Ancestor by Layla F. Saad (Sourcebooks; LJ starred review): No. 8 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah (One World: Random House): No. 8 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

I'm Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness by Austin Channing Brown (Convergent Books: Penguin; LJ starred review): No. 9 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (The New Press): No. 9 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide by Carol Anderson (Bloomsbury): No. 12 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot by Mikki Kendall, (Viking: Penguin): No. 14 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Color of Compromise Study Guide: The Truth about the American Church's Complicity in Racism by Jemar Tisby (Zondervan: Harper; LJ starred review): No. 15 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

Sex and Vanity by Kevin Kwan (Doubleday: Random House) debuts at No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 6 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Home Before Dark by Riley Sager (Dutton: Penguin) claims No. 8 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list

Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia (Del Rey: Random House) holds No. 9 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Friends and Strangers by J. Courtney Sullivan (Knopf) takes No. 10 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Daring and the Duke by Sarah MacLean (Avon: Harper; LJ starred review) says I do at No. 12 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Nonfiction

Begin Again: James Baldwin's America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own by Eddie S. Glaude Jr. (Crown: Random House) debuts at No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The Washington Post reviews Becoming Duchess Goldblatt by Anonymous (HMH): “a tonic, a gift for our anxious summer.” Also, Memoirs and Misinformation by Jim Carrey and Dana Vachon (Knopf): “a simultaneously baffling and mesmerizing examination of Carrey’s psyche.”

USA Today reviews Florence Adler Swims Forever by Rachel Beanland (S. & S.), giving it a rave review of 4 stars and writing “While I felt I wanted more when I turned the last page, mostly I felt awe. I sat for a minute, taking it in.”

The L.A. Times reviews Cool for America: Stories by Andrew Martin (FSG): “fun, irresistible, smart and wise.”

NPR reviews Collective Gravities by Chloe N Clark (Word West LLC): “all the gently weird and sadly wonderful stories in Collective Gravities house bright, gemlike epiphanies. Together they beam.”

The NYT reviews Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man by Mary Trump (S. & S.): “This is a book that’s been written from pain and is designed to hurt.” The paper has takeaways from the book. Also reviewed, Countdown 1945: The Extraordinary Story of the Atomic Bomb and the 116 Days That Changed the World by Chris Wallace (Avid Reader: S. & S.): “On one hand, the book reads like a riveting novel … But … is also a profound story of decision making at the highest levels — and of pathos.” Survivor Song by Paul Tremblay (William Morrow: Harper): “He knows how to drive the story forward, while affording it a layer of linguistic color that makes the whole affair feel vastly more engaging.” Antkind by Charlie Kaufman (Random House): “an exceptionally strange book. It is also an exceptionally good one, and though one is tempted to reach for the roster of comparably gnostic novels by contemporary (-ish) writers — not just Wallace, but Pynchon, obviously; John Barth; Joshua Cohen, perhaps — such comparisons inevitably collapse.”

Briefly Noted

Trump family lawyers still argue to stop Mary Trump’s book. USA Today has details. The paper, which has a copy of the book, also details some of the “cringeworthy moments” revealed.

Editor and publisher Nan A. Talese announces she will retire after a six-decade career. Her list of authors is legendary and includes Margaret Atwood, Ian McEwan, Jennifer Egan, and Antonia Fraser. Deadline reports.

Deadline writes that Phoebe Robinson (2 Dope Queens, You Can’t Touch My Hair) is launching an imprint with Plume/PRH to be called Tiny Reparations Books.

Ernest Cline is writing a sequel to Ready Player One, to be called Ready Player Two (Ballantine: Random House) due out on Nov. 24. Deadline has some details.

Philip Pullman is releasing a novella he wrote over a decade ago for a charity auction that he had not planned on publishing It is called Serpentine and will come out in October. It sits between the His Dark Materials novels and The Secret Commonwealth set. The Guardian reports.

Gary Larson, Far Side, has posted new work. The NYT reports.

Pete Buttigieg announces a new book, Trust: America’s Best Chance is due out on Oct. 6. from Liveright (W. W. Norton). USA Today has some details.

Shelf Awareness reports on the newly created Carolyn Kroll Reidy Memorial Scholarship Program.

The winners of The Prix Albertine Jeunesse are announced. Lit Hub has the list.

Michele Kirsch wins the RSL Christopher Bland Prize for Clean: A story of addiction, recovery and the removal of stubborn stains (Short Books Ltd).

Kwana Jackson, Real Men Knit (Berkley: Penguin), picks books for summer.

Salon picks books for the summer too.

Tor.com has SF books for July.

Here are more stories from The Decameron Project, including one by Tommy Orange.

In LJ, Barbara Hoffert's "Prepub Alert" has more January 2021 titles. Also, Becky Spratford writes a Genre Preview focused on Horror novels.

The Cut has “Fleishman Is in Lockdown,” “the quarantine sequel to Taffy Brodesser-Akner’s best-selling novel.”

Sarah Broom, The Yellow House (Grove Press), answers the NYT’s "By the Book" questions. Elin Hilderbrand, 28 Summers (Little, Brown: Hachette; LJ starred review), features in the NYT’s “Inside the List” column.

Vogue interviews Heather Cocks and Jessica Morgan, The Heir Affair (Grand Central: Hachette).

Camilla Läckberg, The Golden Cage (Knopf), answers Entertainment Weekly’s “What’s in a Page” questions.

The L.A. Times features Ghosting the News: Local Journalism and the Crisis of American Democracy by Margaret Sullivan (Columbia Global Reports).

Electric Lit excerpts The Shame by Makenna Goodman (Milkweed Editions).

Entertainment Weekly excerpts Lore by Alexandra Bracken (Disney-Hyperion: Hachette).

The Washington Post’s Michael Dirda appreciates a book on Caravaggio and one on descriptive bibliography.

Lit Hub reports that “Authors including Colson Whitehead, Eddie S. Glaude Jr., and Adam Rutherford are cancelling events at the Free Library of Philadelphia over complaints from Black employees that they have been mistreated and undervalued there.”

Publishing Perspectives reports that “Grisham, Child, Amazon, PRH Headline Lawsuit of KISS Library for Piracy.”

Authors on Air

NPR’s Life Kit interviews Layla F. Saad, Me and White Supremacy: Combat Racism, Change the World, and Become a Good Ancestor (Sourcebooks; LJ starred review).

USA Today reports that Javicia Leslie will become TV's first Black Batwoman. She is set to be the new star of the CW series.

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina gets cancelled. Deadline has that news.

ALA celebrates the 2020 Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction via Zoom today in what they are calling a “virtual gala.”

The Umbrella Academy Season 2 gets a trailer. It comes out on Netflix on July 31 and is based on the comics by Gerard Way and Gabriel Bá.

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