Zimbabwean Activist, Author, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Receives 2021 PEN Award for Freedom of Expression | Book Pulse

PEN International honors activist and author Tsitsi Dangarembga, This Mournable Body, with its 2021 Award for Freedom of Expression. This week's new best sellers include Star Wars: Light of the Jedi by Charles Soule, Neighbors by Danielle Steel, The Wife Upstairs by Rachel Hawkins, and Keep Sharp by Sanjay Gupta. Connecticut is looking into whether Amazon engaged in anti-competitive behavior in its ebook distribution agreements. Plus, see the trailer for To All the Boys: Always and Forever, the film adaptation of Always and Forever, Lara Jean by Jenny Han.

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New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

Fiction

Star Wars: Light of the Jedi (The High Republic) by Charles Soule (Del Rey: Random House) shines at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Neighbors by Danielle Steel (Delacourt: Random House) moves in at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 5 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Wife Upstairs by Rachel Hawkins (St. Martin's: Macmillan) steps up to No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Outlawed by Anna North (Bloomsbury: Macmillan) claims No. 6 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

The Prophets by Robert Jones, Jr. (G.P. Putnam's Sons: Penguin; LJ starred review) debuts at No. 8 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

The Push by Ashley Audrain (Pamela Dorman: Penguin) pulls in at No. 14 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Black Buck by Mateo Askaripour (HMH) begins at No. 15 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

All the Colors of Night by Jayne Ann Krentz (Berkley: Penguin) dawns at No. 15 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Nonfiction

Keep Sharp: Build a Better Brain at Any Age by Sanjay Gupta (S. & S.) starts at No. 1 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Reviews

The Washington Post reviews On the Suffering of the World by Arthur Schopenhauer and edited by Eugene Thacker (Repeater: Watkins): "Schopenhauer’s cheerless metaphysics often comes across as convincing in the abstract — until we compare his fatalistic and quietist views against our actual experience of, to use an old cliche, life’s rich tapestry."

The Guardian reviews Slash and Burn by Claudia Hernández (And Other Stories): "The sustained interiority of the narrative makes for an intensive reading experience, but it’s a tribute both to Hernández’s careful structure and to Julia Sanches’s translation that the reader is only briefly disoriented each time the narrative passes from mother to daughter to sister."

Book Marks picks “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted 

PEN International honors Tsitsi Dangarembga, This Mournable Body (Graywolf: Macmillan), with its 2021 Award for Freedom of Expression.

Connecticut is looking into whether Amazon engaged in anti-competitive behavior in its ebook distribution agreements. Reuters has details.

BuzzFeed offers "75 Books To Add To Your 2021 TBR List."

Parade suggests new books out this winter, plus 12 historical novels.

Tor.com lists all the sci-fi out this month, as well as new YA SFF.

BookPage recommends recent audiobooks

Amazon also looks at new audiobooks, specifically mysteries.

Readers advisory from LJ: books on grief, academic best sellers, and suspense fiction.

Shelf Awareness previews new books out next week.

Barbara Hoffert has new Prepub Alert columns in LJ.

Julie Carrick Dalton, Waiting for the Night Song (Forge: Macmillan), recommends climate change novels at Electric Lit.

Sarah Ferguson, the Duchess of York, announced on Twitter that her historical romance, Her Heart for a Compass, is due out this summer

The production company Nacelle, led by Brian Volk-Weiss, is launching a Nacelle publishing imprint at Ingram. Deadline reports it will "focus on pop history, nostalgia and limited edition reprints."

Tor.com excerpts The Memory Theater by Karin Tidbeck (Pantheon: Random House).

Entertainment Weekly has an excerpt of Love in English by Maria E. Andreu (Balzer + Bray: HarperCollins). Also, its "What's in a Page" column features Maggie Nelson, On Freedom: Four Songs of Care and Constraint (Graywolf: Macmillan).

The Rumpus interviews Nadia Owusu, Aftershocks (S. & S.). Vogue also has a Q&A with the author.

Guernica's "Back Draft" column features Lisa Dillman, translator of A Luminous Republic by Andrés Barba (Mariner: HMH).

The NYT goes "Inside the List" with Fredrik Backman, Anxious People (Atria Books: S. & S.; LJ starred review). Its "By the Book" column features Susan Minot, Why I Don’t Write: And Other Stories (Knopf).

Mahogany L. Browne discusses Chlorine Sky (Crown Books for Young Readers) with Shondaland.

Kirkus has a Q&A with Mateo Askaripour, Black Buck (HMH).

Salon talks with Amber Ruffin and Lacey Lamar about You'll Never Believe What Happened to Lacey: Crazy Stories about Racism (Grand Central: Hachette; LJ starred review).

Caitlin Horrocks talks about Life Among the Terranauts (Little, Brown: Hachette) with Lit Hub.

The NYT examines "How ‘Orwellian’ Became an All-Purpose Insult." A former high school English teacher begs people to "Stop Comparing Things to 1984" in Electric Lit. Meanwhile, the L.A. Times reports that a stage adaptation of the book will be adapted as a limited-run TV series.

Authors on Air 

See the trailer for To All the Boys: Always and Forever, the film adaptation of Always and Forever, Lara Jean by Jenny Han It premieres on Netflix on Feb. 12.

HBO Max is at work on The Future, a series based on the book The Future Is Yours by Dan Frey (Del Rey: Random House), which is due out Feb. 9. Also, ThePowder Mage trilogy by Brian McClellan will be adapted for TV, as will The Emma Harte Saga series of books by Barbara Taylor Bradford. Deadline reports.

 

Updated 1/22/21: In an earlier edition we incorrectly headlined this post with "Nigerian Activist, Author, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Receives 2021 PEN Award for Freedom of Expression." That is incorrect. Tsitsi Dangarembga is Zimbabwean. We regret the error.

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Miriam Conteh-Morgan

Please edit the title-- Dangaremgba is NOT Nigerian. She's from a different part of the continent, Zimbabwe.

Posted : Jan 22, 2021 03:36


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