Time Lists the '100 Must-Read Books of 2020' | Book Pulse

Time picks 100 must-read books for the year. Fortune and Glory by Janet Evanovich tops this week's bestsellers lists. The 2020 Dayton Literary Peace Prize honors The World That We Knew by Alice Hoffman and Know My Name by Chanel Miller. The Sunken Land Begins to Rise Again by M. John Harrison wins the 2020 Goldsmiths Prize. Forthcoming book news arrives from NYT reporter Maggie Haberman and Sen. Tammy Duckworth. Barack Obama has TV appearances lined up ahead of next week's release of his memoir, A Promised Land.

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Awards News

The 2020 Dayton Literary Peace Prize for fiction goes to The World That We Knew by Alice Hoffman (S. & S.), and for nonfiction to Know My Name by Chanel Miller (Penguin; LJ starred review).

The public selected Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie as the ‘Winner of Winners’ from 25 years of the Women’s Prize for Fiction.

The Sunken Land Begins to Rise Again by M. John Harrison (Gollancz) wins the 2020 Goldsmiths Prize, which honors work that "extends the possibilities of the novel form."

PEN America has named its inaugural winners of the L’Engle-Rahman Prize for Mentorship, which honors participants in its Prison Writing Mentorship Program.

New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

Fiction

Fortune and Glory by Janet Evanovich (Atria: S. & S.) is No. 1 on  both the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

White Ivy by Susie Yang (S. & S.; LJ starred review) sprouts at No. 13 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list. 

The Monster at the End of This Book by Jon Stone and Michael Smollin (Golden Books) debuts at No. 10 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list, nearly 50 years after its original publication.

Nonfiction

Clanlands: Whisky, Warfare, and a Scottish Adventure Like No Other by Sam Heughan, Graham McTavish (Quercus: Hachette) takes No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 5 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Best of Me by David Sedaris (Little, Brown: Hachette) starts at No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 13 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Eleanor by David Michaelis (S. & S.) debuts at No. 11 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Antiracist Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon): No. 1 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House; LJ starred review): No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): No. 5 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House): No. 6 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

How To Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (One World: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 10 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list. 

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 10 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (New Press): No. 11 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo (Seal: Hachette; LJ starred review): No. 13 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah (One World: Random House): No. 15 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews 

The Washington Post reviews Moonflower Murders by Anthony Horowitz (Harper): "the whole metafictional twistiness of his current work — 'The Word Is Murder' includes Anthony Horowitz himself as a major character — actually carries on from the gamelike nature of Golden Age whodunitry." 

NPR reviews One Life by Megan Rapinoe (Penguin): "In trying so hard to center the book around consciousness raising, Rapinoe loses much of the personal storytelling that so naturally lends itself to doing just that."

The NYT reviews Metazoa: Animal Life and the Birth of the Mind by Peter Godfrey-Smith (FSG: Macmillan; LJ starred review): "The whole book is a rather winning combination of not once ever making readers feel as if they are being lectured to; rather, it is the sensation of joining a wise, ever-patient friend on a time-traveling tour of the cognitive experiences of animals." Also, Self-Portrait by Celia Paul (New York Review Books): "captivating." 

Book Marks picks “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

Time lists the "100 Must-Read Books of 2020." 

Amazon's 2020 Children's Choice Book Award finalists are up.

Tor.com rounds up "All the New Science Fiction Books Arriving in November."

Indie releases to look out for this month, via Book Riot.

BookPage highlights this month's best mysteries and thrillers.

Amazon also lists new mysteries and thrillers, and offers a few book club suggestions, too.

CrimeReads has "5 Psychological Thrillers You Should Read In November." 

Shelf Awareness highlights "New Titles Out Next Week."

PopSugar lists "15 Romantic Novels That Feature Characters With Disabilities."

Al Roker, You Look So Much Better in Person: True Stories of Absurdity and Success (Hachette Go), shares his favorite books of the year with Amazon.

Barbara Hoffert has new Prepub Alert columns in LJ.

The Loan Stars list for December arrives.

Penguin is publishing a book about President Trump by NYT reporter Maggie Haberman in 2022. Politico has details.

Sen. Tammy Duckworth's memoir, Every Day Is a Gift (Twelve: Hachette) will be released Mar. 30, 2021. The Associated Press reports.

Ernest Cline, Ready Player Two (Ballantine: Random House), discusses this forthcoming sequel with Entertainment Weekly. Also, a conversation with Samantha Irby, Wow, No Thank You: Essays (Vintage: Random House; LJ starred review) about her books in progress.

The L.A. Times speaks with Cazzie David about her father, Larry David, and her new book, No One Asked for This (Mariner: HMH). 

Emmanuel Acho, Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man (Flatiron, An Oprah Book: Macmillan), discusses sports and racism with Amazon. 

Christie Tate, Group: How One Therapist and a Circle of Strangers Saved My Life (Avid Reader Press: S. & S), is the NYT “Inside the List” feature author. The paper's “By the Book” column features Lenny Kravitz, Let Love Rule (Henry Holt: Macmillan). 

Maaza Mengiste outlines the research behind The Shadow King (W. W. Norton; LJ starred review) with the NYT.

Elle has a Q&A with Delphine Minoui, The Book Collectors: A Band of Syrian Rebels and the Stories That Carried Them Through a War (FSG: Macmillan).

Becky Cooper, We Keep the Dead Close: A Murder at Harvard and a Half Century of Silence (Grand Central: Hachette) shares thoughts on compulsion with Salon.

The Hollywood Reporter talks horror with Leigh Harlen, Blood Like Garnets (TKO Studios: Ingram).

People interviews Ruby Bridges, This Is Your Time (Delacorte Books for Young Readers: Random House). Also, a talk with John "Chick" Donohue, The Greatest Beer Run Ever: A Memoir of Friendship, Loyalty, and War (co-written with J. T. Molloy; William Morrow: HarperCollins).

Electric Lit interviews Samanta Schweblin, Little Eyes (Riverhead: Penguin).

See 10 Asian American poets read from The Best American Poetry 2020 edited by Paisley Rekdal (Scribner: S. & S.) at the Asian American Writers’ Workshop.

Lynne Truss, Murder by Milk Bottle (Bloomsbury: Macmillan), lists other weird murder weapons that appear in fiction for CrimeReads.

Vanity Fair speculates on the slow-moving sale of Simon & Schuster.

The American Booksellers Association says its 2021 Winter Institute will be all-virtual.

The New Yorker has fired Jeffrey Toobin. The Washington Post reports.

Book Riot has information literacy advice on local news resources.

The Nation examines "The Limits of the Viral Book Review."

Authors on Air

Ahead of next week's release of A Promised Land (Crown: Random House), Barack Obama will appear on CBS Sunday Morning, 60 Minutes, and Apple TV+'s The Oprah Conversation. Also, Amazon Studios will adapt Yes, Daddy by Jonathan Parks-Ramage (HMH), which is forthcoming June 2021. Deadline reports on both stories.

On NPR's Fresh Air, Harold McGee shares how he briefly lost his sense of smell while writing Nose Dive: A Field Guide to the World's Smells (Penguin).

Lenny Kravitz, Let Love Rule (Henry Holt: Macmillan), will be on Live with Kelly and Ryan today.

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