Emma Donoghue, Abi Daré & Shahnaz Ahsan Added to the 'Not the Booker' Shortlist | Book Pulse

Thick as Thieves by Sandra Brown tops library holds this week. People’s “Book of the Week" is Grown Ups by Emma Jane Unsworth. Emma Donoghue, Abi Daré, and Shahnaz Ahsan are added to the Not the Booker shortlist. The James Tait Black Prizes for Fiction and Biography are announced. DC FanDome gets wall-to-wall coverage, with plenty of new trailers.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Big Books of the Week

Thick as Thieves by Sandra Brown (Grand Central: Hachette) leads holds this week.

Other titles in demand include:

Squeeze Me by Carl Hiaasen (Knopf)

Emerald Blaze: A Hidden Legacy Novel by Ilona Andrews (Avon: Harper; LJ starred review)

Hoax: Donald Trump, Fox News, and the Dangerous Distortion of Truth by Brian Stelter (Atria/One Signal Publishers: S. & S.)

The Exiles by Christina Baker Kline (Custom House: Harper; LJ starred review)

Someone to Romance by Mary Balogh (Berkley: Penguin)

These books and others publishing the week of Aug. 24, 2020, are listed in a downloadable spreadsheet. 

Librarians and Booksellers Suggest

Three LibraryReads picks publish this week:

The Exiles by Christina Baker Kline (Custom House: Harper; LJ starred review)

“In her extremely readable fashion, Kline has created another masterpiece of historical fiction. This time she takes readers on a journey from England to Australia, where prisoners were exiled in the 19th century.The riveting story becomes personal as Kline engages readers in the individual stories of the enslaved women. Perfect for book groups and fans of Lisa Wingate and Kristin Hannah." —Marilyn Sieb, L.D. Fargo Library, Lake Mills, WI

It is also an Indie Next selection:

“One of the best books I’ve read this year! This is a meticulously researched historical fiction based on the lives of three women convicted of petty theft in England who are shipped to the convict colony of Australia, never to return to their home country. We also meet a young Aboriginal girl who weaves through this story like a phantom. There are aspects of Les Mis and The Forgotten Garden in this beautiful book. I simply adored it.” —Elizabeth Barnhill, Fabled Bookshop & Café, Waco, TX

Squeeze Me by Carl Hiaasen (Knopf)

"Angie runs her own business, Discreet Captures, in Palm Beach, FL where she traps and relocates wildlife. She receives a call from the caretaker of a local estate about a giant python and manages to remove the snake without offending party guests. But what happened to Kiki Pew, the wealthy hostess who seems to have vanished from the event? For fans of satirical thrillers and Florida." —Linda Tilden, Mt. Laurel Public Library, Mt. Laurel, NJ

Emerald Blaze: A Hidden Legacy Novel by Ilona Andrews (Avon: Harper; LJ starred review)

“While investigating a murder, Texas deputy warden Catalina Baylor must again work with handsome Alessandro Sagredo, a fellow mage who’ll do anything to keep her safe. Another urban fantasy home run for Andrews--the leads are perfect together and the world-building is phenomenal.” —Caroline Quintanilla, Seminole County Public Library, Sanford, FL

Two additional Indie Next choices publish this week as well:

Vesper Flights by Helen Macdonald (Grove)

“I wish I could give Vesper Flights twelve stars out of five. In this beautiful, loving, poignant portrait of a nature lover’s world — gosh, what an understatement — Helen MacDonald continues to prove herself a nature-writing powerhouse. Her literary skills make her a modern legend, and Vesper Flights is sure to touch as many hearts, if not more, than H Is for Hawk did.” —Nikki F., Bookie’s Chicago, Chicago, IL

Winter Counts by David Heska Wanbli Weiden (Ecco: Harper)

“Weiden’s book is a thriller with an important social and political message. Following a Lakota ‘enforcer’ who enacts extrajudicial punishment to fill the gaps in the legal system, Winter Counts is a twisty new addition to the growing Indigenous literature canon. While some of the action may fall into somewhat predictable territory, Weiden’s exploration of the injustices of reservation life are vital.” —Ashley Baeckmann, Briars & Brambles Books, Windham, NY

In the Media

People’s “Book of the Week" is Grown Ups by Emma Jane Unsworth (Gallery/Scout: S. & S.). Also getting attention are True Story by Kate Reed Petty (Viking: Penguin) and Sweet Sorrow by David Nicholls (Mariner: HMH; LJ starred review). People also highlights thrillers on audio for the summer. They include His & Hers by Alice Feeney, read by Richard Armitage, Stephanie Racine, et al. (Macmillan Audio), The Less Dead by Denise Mina read by Katie Leung (Little, Brown: Hachette), and We Are All the Same in the Dark by Julia Heaberlin , read by Jenna Lamia, Catherine Taber, and Kirby Heyborne (Random House). People’s “Picks” include The One and Only Ivan and Pure.

Reviews

The NYT reviews Hoax: Donald Trump, Fox News, and the Dangerous Distortion of Truth by Brian Stelter (Atria/One Signal Publishers: S. & S.): “It provides a thorough and damning exploration of the incestuous relationship between Trump and his favorite channel — and of Fox’s democracy-decaying role as a White House propaganda organ masquerading as conservative journalism.”

NPR reviews Loathe at First Sight by Suzanne Park (Avon: Harper): “A genuinely funny and charismatic heroine shines in … the delightful and eye-opening debut.” Also, Luster by Raven Leilani (FSG: Macmillan): “smashes together capitalism, sex, loss, and trauma and constructs something new with the pieces, using pitch-black humor as glue. That this Frankenstein's monster of genres and topics works so well is a testament to Leilani's talent.”

The Washington Post reviews Squeeze Me by Carl Hiaasen (Knopf): “scabrous and unrelentingly hilarious.” Also, By Force Alone by Lavie Tidhar (Head of Zeus): “It is a vicious, beautiful, profane and wickedly funny reimagining of the rise and fall of King Arthur without the chivalry, divine right or holy quests.”

Briefly Noted

USA Today picks five books for the week.

CrimeReads selects ten books for the week.

Parade offers “The Poolside Reads You'll Want to Pick Up Before the End of Summer.”

Vogue names the fourteen novels for the fall.

Electric Lit showcases “10 Books About the Importance of the Postal Service.”

The Star Tribune has books that will transport readers to the state fair.

Emma Donoghue, Abi Daré, and Shahnaz Ahsan are added to the Not the Booker shortlist. The Guardian reports.

The James Tait Black Prizes for Fiction and Biography are announced.

BuzzFeed has some of the virtual book events of the week.

The Washington Post features Brian Stelter, Hoax: Donald Trump, Fox News, and the Dangerous Distortion of Truth (Atria/One Signal Publishers: S. & S.). The Guardian has some tidbits from the book and Vanity Fair has an excerpt.

The NYT writes about author Jon Meacham’s remarks at the Democratic National Convention. Meacham, His Truth Is Marching On: John Lewis and the Power of Hope (Random House), also has a piece in the paper about the books that helped frame “The South’s Fight for White Supremacy.”

DC FanDome got wall to wall coverage over the weekend. See new trailers below and for round-ups see Variety, Deadline, Entertainment Weekly, and The Hollywood Reporter. The Washington Post writes about the return of a Black superhero universe with characters such as Static Shock, Icon, Rocket and Hardware retuning to DC Comics in 2021. Fans turning into the second part of DC Fandome, on Sept. 12, will get a short window of access to one of the comics. Entertainment Weekly adds to this the news that there might well be a Black Batman in the future at DC comics. Entertainment Weekly reports on the discussion among Neil Gaiman, Michael Sheen, and G. Willow Wilson about The Sandman at DC FanDome. Also, EW showcases Teen Titans: Beast Boy by Kami Garcia, illustrated by Gabriel Picolo (DC Comics).

The Washington Post features The Story of Gardening by Penelope Hobhouse, with Ambra Edwards (Princeton Architectural Press: Chronicle).

Entertainment Weekly has a synopsis of the forthcoming Rule of Wolves by Leigh Bardugo (Imprint: Macmillan).

ZZ Packer interviews Ibram X. Kendi, How To Be an Antiracist (One World: Random House; LJ starred review)for GQ.

Margaret Wilkerson Sexton, The Revisioners (Counterpoint; LJ starred review), answers the Book Marks questionnaire.

Entertainment Weekly interviews Casey McQuiston, Red, White, and Royal Blue (Griffin: St. Martin’s). Her new book, One Last Stop, debuts June 1, 2021.

The Guardian interviews Robert Macfarlane, Underland: A Deep Time Journey (W.W. Norton; LJ starred review). Also, an interview with Hari Kunzru, Red Pill (Knopf). There is also a feature on Raynor Winn, The Salt Path: A Memoir (Penguin). Her newest, The Wild Silence: A Memoir (Penguin), comes out in April.

The NYT interviews Maximilian Uriarte, Battle Born: Lapis Lazuli (Little, Brown: Hachette).

Amazon interviews author Jenny Han about the All the Boys films.

Electric Lit has a piece about author Robert Deane Pharr.

Sarah Moss, Summerwater (FSG: Macmillan), writes about her novel, the pandemic, and community for The Guardian.

CBS Sunday Morning reports on the September Vanity Fair issue guest edited by Ta-Nehisi Coates.

The NYT explores cookbook deals for people of color, but many “warn the industry’s problems cannot be solved just by cutting checks.”

Publishing Perspectives writes about the Aspen Institutes focus on the lack of diversity in publishing.

The L. A. Times has a report on Black-owned bookstores.

The Washington Post writes about how small independent bookstores are faring during the pandemic.

George R. R. Martin has filed a lawsuit in connection to his werewolf novella The Skin Trade. The L. A. Times reports.

The Atlantic runs the poem “Late Loving” by Mona Van Duyn.

Lit Hub has a report on the designs for the Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library.

Linguist and author Geoffrey Nunberg has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Mercedes Barcha, the wife of Gabriel García Márquez, has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Authors on Air

The Batman gets a trailer. It is set for Oct. 1, 2021.

Wonder Woman 1984 gets a second trailer. It is set for this Oct. 2.

A trailer is out for the Zack Snyder’s Justice League. It debuts sometime in 2021 on HBO Max in four, one-hour segments.

A sneak peek trailer is out for The Suicide Squad. It debuts sometime in 2021 as well.

NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday interviews Nnedi Okorafor, Ikenga (Viking Books for Young Readers: Penguin; SLJ starred review).

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Be the first reader to comment.

Comment Policy:
  • Be respectful, and do not attack the author, people mentioned in the article, or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  • Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  • Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.
  • Comments may be republished in print, online, or other forms of media.
  • If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.


RELATED 

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?

We are currently offering this content for free. Sign up now to activate your personal profile, where you can save articles for future viewing

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?