Stephenie Meyer: More Twilight Books Are Coming | Book Pulse

Stephenie Meyer, Midnight Sun, leads 12 new titles onto the bestseller lists. She also announces more Twilight books in the future. The previously untitled Bob Woodward book is unveiled: Rage. It debuts on September 15 and is already getting a big sales bump. There is news on the “mega year” as hundreds of the books delayed due to the pandemic begin to arrive. There is plenty of adaptation news, including that Roxane Gay’s The Banks is headed to the big screen, Maurice Broaddus’s Sorcerers is headed to TV, and Elisabeth Moss will star in the adaptation of Mrs. March by Virginia Feito.

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New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

Midnight Sun by Stephenie Meyer (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers: Hachette) debuts at No. 1 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Rowley Jefferson's Awesome Friendly Adventure by Jeff Kinney (Amulet Books: Abrams) takes No. 5 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Silent Wife by Karin Slaughter (William Morrow: Harper) holds No. 7 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list and No. 10 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Sucker Punch by Laurell K Hamilton (Berkley: Penguin) claims No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 8 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Harrow the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir (Tor.com: Macmillan; LJ starred review) continues the series run at No. 9 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Luster by Raven Leilani (FSG: Macmillan) debuts at No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

The Death of Vivek Oji by Akwaeke Emezi (Riverhead: Penguin; LJ starred review) closes the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list at No. 15.

Nonfiction

Live Free Or Die: America (and the World) on the Brink by Sean Hannity (Threshold Editions: S. & S.) debuts at No. 1 on both the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list (with the dagger indicating bulk buying) and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House; LJ starred review) opens at No. 3 on both the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Make Change: How to Fight Injustice, Dismantle Systemic Oppression, and Own Our Future by Shaun King (HMH) grabs No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

It Was All a Lie: How the Republican Party Became Donald Trump by Stuart Stevens (Knopf) claims No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

True Crimes and Misdemeanors: The Investigation of Donald Trump by Jeffrey Toobin (Doubleday: Random House) argues its case at No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Antiracist Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon): No. 1 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 9 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (New Press): No. 2 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo (Seal: Hachette; LJ starred review): No. 3 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

How To Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (One World: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 11 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 5 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House): No. 7 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Walking with the Wind: A Memoir of the Movement (S. & S.): No. 8 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): No. 9 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi (Nation): No. 10 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah (One World: Random House): No. 13 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Across That Bridge: A Vision for Change and the Future of America (Hachette): No. 14 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 15 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The NYT reviews Entitled: How Male Privilege Hurts Women by Kate Manne (Crown: Random House): “One of the qualities that makes Manne’s writing bracing and even thrilling to read is her refusal to ingratiate herself by softening the edges of her resolve.”

The Washington Post reviews Love After Love by Ingrid Persaud (One World: Random House): “it will be a pleasurable read for anyone who has tried and failed in love, marriage, friendship and parenting.” Also, Sweet Sorrow by David Nicholls (Mariner: HMH; LJ starred review): “just might be the sweetest book to brighten your late summer.”

Entertainment Weekly reivews The New American by Micheline Aharonian Marcom (S. & S.: LJ starred review), giving it a B+ and writing “it's far richer than the pathologizing best-seller to which comparisons will surely be made.” Also, Love After Love by Ingrid Persaud (One World: Random House), giving it an A- and writing it “offers both a window into Caribbean literature and a wider lens on immigration, race, and sexuality. Mostly, though, it's just a great story: funny, tender, and true.”

Tor.com reviews The First Sister by Linden A. Lewis (Gallery: S. & S.): “It’s an entertaining novel in a promising world (albeit a world whose structures I have a nagging urge to question): an enjoyable queer space opera romp with a dark underbelly.”

Book Marks has “5 Reviews Yu Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

The previously untitled Bob Woodward book is unveiled: Rage (S. & S.). It debuts on September 15 and is already getting a big sales bump. USA Today has some details on the book.

Stephenie Meyer plans two more Twilight books - but not right now. The Guardian reports.

Ian Williams has a new book forthcoming in fall 2021. It will be titled Disorientation and “explores being Black and the diversity of Black lives.” CBC reports.

Vulture reports that comedian Ziwe Fumudoh has a book of essays on the way, The Book of Ziwe (Abrams Image), due out in Jan. 2022.

Grub Street interviews Chanie Apfelbaum, author of Millennial Kosher: recipes reinvented for the modern palate (Mesorah Publications Ltd.), who has a new book in the works with Clarkson Potter for 2022.

The Guardian reports on the “mega year” as hundreds of the books delayed due to the pandemic begin to arrive.

Salon picks must-read books for August.

Barbara Hoffert has new “Prepub Alert” columns in LJ.

Lit Hub selects “43 of the Most Iconic Short Stories in the English Language.” Also, “the greatest novels ever written about every sport.”

Crime Reads selects “5 Psychological Thrillers You Should Read This August.”

The NYT considers some summer beach reads.

Electric Lit suggests “9 Novels About Nannies for Grown-Up Baby-Sitters Club Fans.”

The longlist for the Writers' Trust of Canada/McClelland & Stewart Journey Prize is out. CBC has details.

Remezcla reports on AOC: The Fearless Rise and Powerful Resonance of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez by Lynda Lopez (St. Martin’s: Macmillan).

The Washington Post writes about the wave of food memoirs, and their lack of diversity.

The L.A. Times features Ali Smith and Summer (Pantheon: Random House).

The L.A. Times features Brit Bennett and “the inspiration behind her bestselling novel” The Vanishing Half (Riverhead: Penguin).

Michael Dirda celebrates Andrew Lang and his The Blue Fairy Book in The Washington Post.

Lucy Foley, The Guest List (William Morrow: Harper; LJ starred review), features in the NYT “Inside The List” column.

Electric Lit runs "Travelers Must Be Content" by Mavis Gallant, as recommended by Brandon Taylor.

The NYT runs the poem “My Father Disappears Into Flowers” by Jan Beatty, as selected by Naomi Shihab Nye.

The Guardian reports on the Reclaim Her Name collection, part of the 25th anniversary celebration of the Women’s prize for fiction. It consists of 24 free ebooks issued with the names of their female authors, such as Middlemarch by Mary Ann Evans rather than by George Eliot.

The NYT has a remembrance of poet Sulaiman Layeq.

Authors on Air

NPR’s Fresh Air interviews Peniel E. Joseph, The Sword and the Shield: The Revolutionary Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. (Basic Books: Hachette).

The Hollywood Reporter writes about the forthcoming Batman: Soul of the Dragon animated film.

Roxane Gay’s The Banks is headed to the big screen. Variety reports.

AMC Networks is adapting Maurice Broaddus’s Sorcerers. IndyStar has details.

Elisabeth Moss will star in the forthcoming adaptation of Mrs. March by Virginia Feito. Entertainment Weekly has details.

Netflix will work with Disney on “a trilogy of interconnected Fear Street films," based on R.L. Stine’s books. A limited TV series is in the works to adapt Herman Wouk’s The Winds of War and War and Remembrance. Elsie Chapman’s Caster gets optioned for the movies. One of Us is Lying by Karen M. McManus is set for TV. Louise Fitzhugh’s Harriet the Spy is getting turned into an animated adaptation for TV. Jade City by Fonda Lee is headed to Peacock. Deadline has details on all.

The creators of Avatar: The Last Airbender have left the Netflix adaptation. Here is the open letter with the news.

Unpregnant gets a trailer. It is based on Unpregnant by Jenni Hendriks, Ted Caplan (HarperTeen) and will air on HBO Max starting Sept. 10.

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