Simon & Schuster Cancels Senator Josh Hawley's Forthcoming Book | Book Pulse

Simon & Schuster will no longer publish Senator Josh Hawley's forthcoming book, The Tyranny of Big Tech, which was due out June 22. U.S. print book sales were up 8.2 percent in 2020, according to the NPD Group, with A Promised Land by Barack Obama leading the sales numbers. New adaptations out this week include All Creatures Great and Small and the new season of American Gods. The English translation of Ask Iwata: Words of Wisdom from Satoru Iwata, Nintendo's Legendary CEO will be released on April 13. Merriam-Webster reports the top words searched for on its site on Wednesday included sedition, coup d'état, and fascism, and the NYT speaks with historians about the evolution of some terms.

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Page to Screen

Jan. 8

Blizzard of Souls, based on the book by Aleksandrs Grins. VOD. Reviews | Trailer

Lupin, based on the Arsène Lupin series by Maurice Leblanc. Netflix. Reviews | Trailer

Jan. 9

A Discovery of Witches, based on the All Souls trilogy by Deborah Harkness. AMC. Reviews | Trailer

Jan. 10

All Creatures Great and Small, based on the books by James Herriot. PBS. Reviews | Trailer

American Gods, based on the book by Neil Gaiman. Starz. No reviews | Trailer

Jan. 12

The Empty Man, based on the graphic novel by Cullen Bunn and Vanesa R. Del Rey. VOD. Reviews | Trailer

Trickster, based on Son of a Trickster by Eden Robinson. The CW. No reviews | Trailer

Reviews

The Washington Post reviews Saving Justice: Truth, Transparency, and Trust by James Comey (Flatiron: Macmillan): "...the inequities of the criminal justice system as it now exists, as opposed to the high-minded ideals that Comey treasures, make this a harder sell in the absence of sustained reflection on the system’s failures." Also, Outlawed by Anna North (Bloomsbury: Macmillan): "...a thrilling tale eerily familiar but utterly transformed." Unsolaced: Along the Way to All That Is by Gretel Ehrlich (Pantheon: Random House): "...a lovingly observed account of the lives of people, animals and the landscapes that sustain them, spun together as deftly as a spider’s web, filled with purpose and urgency." Nazi Wives: The Women at the Top of Hitler’s Germany by James Wyllie (St. Martin's: Macmillan): "...he recounts their stories with a bracing combination of scholarship and an almost cinematic — not surprising, given his other work — approach to spinning a compelling narrative." The Pattern Seekers: How Autism Drives Human Invention by Simon Baron-Cohen (Basic: Hachette): "...an ambitious work." The FBI Way Inside the Bureau’s Code of Excellence by Frank Figliuzzi (Custom House: HarperCollins): "Figliuzzi’s book is a timely reminder that our justice system will suffer greatly if the varieties of right and wrong are reduced to a binary choice between public office and prison." Fundamentals: Ten Keys to Reality by Frank Wilczek (Penguin): "...the author strikes a nice Goldilocksian balance between simplicity and comprehension."

The NYT reviews Icebound: Shipwrecked at the Edge of the World by Andrea Pitzer (Scribner: S. & S.): "'Icebound' is a reminder that there was once a time when things were unknown."

NPR reviews Persephone Station by Stina Leicht (Saga: S. & S.): "She's trying to do a book that feels both weighty and light, both serious and fun, and for long stretches, she pulls off what is a very difficult balancing act."

The L.A. Times reviews A Swim in a Pond in the Rain: In Which Four Russians Give a Master Class on Writing, Reading, and Life by George Saunders (Random House): "...though he approaches the book with I’m-just-winging-it humility, he works in some pedagogy." 

Book Marks’s "Best Reviewed Books of the Week."

Briefly Noted

Simon & Schuster will no longer be publishing Senator Josh Hawley's forthcoming book, The Tyranny of Big Tech, which was due out June 22. The NYT reports.

Publishers Weekly offers personal favorites of 2020, plus the best books coming out next week.

Town & Country lists "The 28 Must-Read Books of Winter 2021."

The NYT suggests 9 new books out this week

CrimeReads recommends 5 new psychological thrillers.

"Learn something in 2021 with these 5 books" suggested by The Seattle Times.

Amazon lists "Highly anticipated true crime books of early 2021" and cookbooks from TV shows

U.S. print book sales were up 8.2 percent in 2020, according to the NPD Group, with A Promised Land by Barack Obama (Random House) leading the sales numbers.

The English translation of Ask Iwata: Words of Wisdom from Satoru Iwata, Nintendo's Legendary CEO edited by Hobonichi (VIZ Media) will be released on April 13. Nintendo Life reports.

BOMB has a Q&A with Lucie Britsch, Sad Janet (Riverhead: Penguin).

“If there were 20 million enslaved people, then there are 20 million stories to be told,” Robert Jones, Jr., The Prophets (G.P. Putnam's Sons: Penguin; LJ starred review) tells Shondaland in an interview.

Jenn Bane and Trin Garritano, Friendshipping: The Art of Finding Friends, Being Friends, and Keeping Friends (Workman), talk about book influences with Shelf Awareness.

Electric Lit speaks with Abeer Hoque, Olive Witch (Fourth Estate: HarperCollins), about teaching writing.

The Millions talks with Joshua Bennett, Owed (Penguin: LJ starred review).

The NYT's "By the Book" column features Allan Gurganus, The Uncollected Stories of Allan Gurganus (Liveright: W. W. Norton). 

Electric Lit interviews Mateo Askaripour, Black Buck (HMH).

"Memoir is a bloody art," Charlie Gilmour says in Vogue about the process of writing Featherhood: A Memoir of Two Fathers and a Magpie (Scribner: S. & S.).

Steve Seid discusses Media Burn: Ant Farm and the Making of an Image (Inventory) with Datebook.

Guernica interviews Alistair Ian Blyth, translator of Before Brezhnev Died by Iulian Ciocan (Dalkey Archive).

Merriam-Webster reports the top words searched for on its site on Wednesday included sedition, coup d'état, and fascism. The NYT explores some of the terms with Geoffrey R. Stone, Perilous Times: Free Speech in Wartime: From the Sedition Act of 1798 to the War on Terrorism (W. W. Norton), Joanne Freeman, The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to the Civil War (FSG: Macmillan; LJ starred review), and others.

As part of its coverage honoring those lost to Covid-19, the NYT remembers Shamsur Rahman Faruqi, "credited among scholars with the revival of Urdu literature."

Poet Jean Valentine has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Authors on Air

Gugu Mbatha-Raw will star in the BBC adaptation of The Girl Before by JP Delaney (Ballantine: Random House). TNT is developing a series adaptation of Heresy by Melissa Lenhardt (Red Hook: Hachette). Deadline has details.

Lit Hub speaks with Francisco Goldman about The Art of Political Murder, which was adapted into a recent documentary for HBO.

Lil Nas X, C Is for Country (Random House Books for Young Readers), will be on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon tonight.

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