Royal Book "Finding Freedom" Gets the Crown Today | Book Pulse

Finding Freedom: Harry and Meghan and the Making of a Modern Royal Family by Omid Scobie, Carolyn Durand gets focused attention while Men to Avoid in Art and Life by Nicole Tersigni, The World of Cyberpunk 2077 by Marcin Batylda, and Hatemonger: Stephen Miller, Donald Trump, and the White Nationalist Agenda by Jean Guerrero get big sales bumps. BBC America announces the premiere window for The Watch, based on Terry Pratchett’s Discworld. It will debut sometime in January 2021. The Splatterpunk Award winners are announced, as are the Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellowships finalists.

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Buzzy Books and News

USA Today features Finding Freedom: Harry and Meghan and the Making of a Modern Royal Family by Omid Scobie, Carolyn Durand (Dey Street: Hachette). NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday interviews the authors. Bustle has coverage and HuffPost also has a story.

More buzzy books for the day include Men to Avoid in Art and Life by Nicole Tersigni (Chronicle Books), The World of Cyberpunk 2077 by Marcin Batylda (Dark Horse: Random House), and Hatemonger: Stephen Miller, Donald Trump, and the White Nationalist Agenda by Jean Guerrero (William Morrow: Harper). All three see sales bumps.

BBC America announces that their new series The Watch, based on Terry Pratchett’s Discworld, will debut in January 2021. Tor.com has more details as well.

Reviews

The NYT reviews Stanley Kubrick: American Filmmaker by David Mikics (Yale Univ.): “cool, cerebral book about a cool, cerebral talent. This is not a full-dress biography … but a brisk study of his films, with enough of the life tucked in to add context as well as brightness and bite.” Also, The Boy in the Field by Margot Livesey (Harper): “exquisite.” The Standardization of Demoralization Procedures by Jennifer Hofmann (Little, Brown: Hachette): “gripping.” The Unreality of Memory: And Other Essays by Elisa Gabbert (FSG Originals: Macmillan): “With its expansive curiosity and encyclopedic style, Gabbert’s book can make for unsettling reading, especially in a time of actual crisis.” “The Shortlist” looks at “Boundary-Pushing Books for Fans of Narrative Experiments.” Lastly, the “New & Noteworthy” column is out.

The Washington Post reviews Intimations: Six Essays by Zadie Smith (Penguin): “a balm during an anxious year.” Also, Tomboyland by Melissa Faliveno (Topple: Little A.): “On the surface, its beautiful prose belies the darker complexities it scrapes at, making it all the more gratifying to read.” Also, three audiobook picks.

The L.A. Times reviews The Queen of Tuesday: A Lucille Ball Story by Darin Strauss (Random House): “Strauss finds his footing toward the end, balancing Isidore's and Lucille’s real lives and the romance he’s dreamed for them.”

Briefly Noted

Bustle selects books for the week.

Glennon Doyle picks summer reads for Amazon.

BookPage features August Romance novels.

Popsugar names “3 New Books Coming Out This August That Our Editors Couldn't Put Down.”

Lit Hub5 Books You May Have Missed in July: New Literature in Translation to Pick Up.”

The 2020 Splatterpunk Awards winners are announced. Locus reports.

The Poetry Foundation announces the finalists for the 2020 Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellowships.

The NYT features “Edward P. Jones’s Carefully Quantified Literary World.” Also, in The NYT Style Magazine, there is a feature on fifteen creative women, including Sonoko Sakai, Japanese Home Cooking: Simple Meals, Authentic Flavors (Roost).

Electric Lit interviews Raven Leilani, Luster (FSG: Macmillan).

Slate interviews Kate Manne, Entitled: How Male Privilege Hurts Women (Crown: Random House).

Tor.com interviews Gabreila Houston, The Second Bell (Angry Robot: Penguin).

Lit Hub interviews Iris Martin Cohen, William Deresiewicz, Jessica Gross, Raven Leilani, and Héctor Tobar.

The Guardian picks A Taste for Death by P. D. James (Vintage: Random House) as its reading group pick for August.

Entertainment Weekly writes about the podcast, The Chronicles of Now, and a new story (and audio edition of that story) written by Curtis Sittenfeld. Also, EW has coverage of the forthcoming Black & White & Weird All Over: The Lost Photographs of "Weird Al" Yankovic '83 – '86 by Jon "Bermuda" Schwartz, "Weird Al" Yankovic (1984 Publishing).

Tor.com excerpts Wayward Witch by Zoraida Córdova (Sourcebooks Fire).

The Cut excerpts This Is Major: Notes on Diana Ross, Dark Girls, and Being Dope by Shayla Lawson (Harper Perennial; LJ starred review).

Big Finish announces that Christopher Eccleston, the Ninth Doctor Who, is retuning in a new series of full-cast audios, starting in May 2021. Tor.com has more details.

BuzzFeed details some of the virtual book events of the week.

Authors on Air

PBS NewsHour interviews Daniel Nieh, Beijing Payback (Ecco: Harper).

Fox News features Camilla Can Vote: Celebrating the Centennial of Women's Right to Vote by Mary Morgan Ketchel, Marsha Blackburn (Forefront Books: S. &  S.).

Rogue One is getting a spin-off series on Disney+. Goldie Taylor’s Paper Gods is getting adapted by ABC. Rosie Danan’s debut novel The Roommate is optioned for the movies.

All Together Now, an adaptation of Matthew Quick’s Sorta Like a Rock Star, gets a trailer. It debuts on Netflix on Aug. 28.

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